Women's Retreat

Women's Retreat

Women's Retreat 2020: February 7-10

Conversations on Story, Claiming Our Voice, and Women's Experiences

“Truly I tell you, wherever the good news is proclaimed in the whole world, what she has done will be told in remembrance of her." –Mark 14:9

Join us for a weekend of gathering around story. We know our stories are powerful and world-shaping. This Women’s Retreat we will talk about claiming our voice and entering into the practice of deep listening.  We will journey together to reflect on our own paths and revisit them with new eyes.  We look forward to your presence as we listen to our minds, bodies, and spirits.

Focused on holistic renewal, Women’s Retreat is a space for women to step back, put busy lives on pause, try something new, and, most importantly, to renew the bonds of womanhood with one another. Through intentional conversation, art, music, and reflection we are equipped with good courage for life beyond this “place apart.”

Holden Village will lead small group sessions relating to the arts, pottery, cross country skiing (snow permitting), snowshoe hike and nature throughout the Women's Retreat Weekend.

To register for the Women's Retreat, please visit the Registration page and select the dates February 7-10, 2020.

REGISTER TODAY

Thank you for your continued support of Holden Village. We hope to see you in February!

Teaching Faculty

Kathleen Grimbly
Kathleen began practicing yoga as a teenager.  Throughout her sixty-four years this passion and teaching has taken her places like Holden and Massachusetts, healed her pain and saved her life. After twenty years as a kayak guide and outfitter she spent twenty years with undiagnosed Lyme disease complex, with five whiplash injuries sprinkled throughout.  Chronic pain invited her to study structural yoga therapy and the Egoscue Method of realignment.  She's working on writing her memoir, about kayaking with Orca whales, the health of the Salish Sea and healing from Lyme.  Her favorite quote from C.S. Lewis is "Pain is God's megaphone."
Sessions:
Our Design Function: Healing Pain, Posture & Limitati
While diverse in many ways, we share a design that keeps us functional and free.  Aging and injury can interfere, but there is no reason we can't sustain that design for a lifetime.  Learn to identify postural changes in yourself and others, the many ways these affect our lives and a few practices for whole body realignment that anyone can do.  We'll identify meditations and "mantras" that help us let go into healing.
Yoga Walk: Asana & Meditation for walking
We'll begin with practices that balance and warm our bodies for being present in our walking practice.  Then a meditative walk on Holden trails takes us into the presence of nature, of which we are a part.  Finally, we'll end with a few brief postures to rebalance our bodies and ground our experience.  
Lie down in peace: restoratives
Often when we travel it's challenging to sleep restfully when we arrive.  Begin your first evening at Holden in restorative postures (in your 'jammies, if you like!)  that calm the central nervous system and restore alignment after sitting.  We'll meditate on readings from "Prayers of the Cosmos", and end with yoga Nidra.

Breitag_Linda.jpgLinda Breitag – Guest Village Musician
Linda Breitag (she/her) is a songwriter and fiddler whose patchwork life includes a Quebec-based cajun/zydeco band, singing birthday-grams as King George III, and a year in a secluded mountain retreat (maverick/calligrapher/logger assistant/gardener/secretary). She has an M.A. in ethnomusicology/folklore, has worked at Smithsonian Folkways Records, Advocating Change Together, in a ton of schools, and with a pile of spiritual directors (toddlers). She lives in Minneapolis with Ray Makeever and vicariously in Massachusetts with Sophia, their rugby-obsessed college daughter. Linda makes odd stuffed animals and is on the mindfulness meditation path since her brain is on hyperdrive and her heart has few defenses against the ocean of beauty and pain that is the world.

Cover photo by Hannah Lauber