Teaching Faculty

Holden Village TEACHING FACULTY

Holden's visiting faculty form the backbone of our educational programming. View the information below to learn more about each of Holden's 2020 visiting faculty members and their sessions.

VISIT HOLDEN VILLAGE DURING TEACHING FACULTY WEEKS

2019 Teaching Faculty Recommended Reading

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Spring 2020  | Summer 2020  |  Fall 2020

SPRING 2020

February 5–17, 2020

Kathleen Grimbly

GrimmleyKathleen_TF2020-web.jpgKathleen began practicing yoga as a teenager.  Throughout her sixty-four years this passion and teaching has taken her places like Holden and Massachusetts, healed her pain and saved her life. After twenty years as a kayak guide and outfitter she spent twenty years with undiagnosed Lyme disease complex, with five whiplash injuries sprinkled throughout.  Chronic pain invited her to study structural yoga therapy and the Egoscue Method of realignment.  She's working on writing her memoir, about kayaking with Orca whales, the health of the Salish Sea and healing from Lyme.  Her favorite quote from C.S. Lewis is "Pain is God's megaphone."


Sessions
Our Design Function: Healing Pain, Posture & Limitation


While diverse in many ways, we share a design that keeps us functional and free.  Aging and injury can interfere, but there is no reason we can't sustain that design for a lifetime.  Learn to identify postural changes in yourself and others, the many ways these affect our lives and a few practices for whole body realignment that anyone can do.  We'll identify meditations and "mantras" that help us let go into healing.

Yoga Walk: Asana & Meditation for walking

We'll begin with practices that balance and warm our bodies for being present in our walking practice.  Then a meditative walk on Holden trails takes us into the presence of nature, of which we are a part.  Finally, we'll end with a few brief postures to rebalance our bodies and ground our experience.  
Lie down in peace: restoratives
. Often when we travel it's challenging to sleep restfully when we arrive.  Begin your first evening at Holden in restorative postures (in your 'jammies, if you like!)  that calm the central nervous system and restore alignment after sitting.  We'll meditate on readings from "Prayers of the Cosmos", and end with yoga Nidra.

Breitag_Linda_TF2020-web.jpgLinda Breitag – Guest Village Musician


Linda Breitag (she/her) is a songwriter and fiddler whose patchwork life includes a Quebec-based cajun/zydeco band, singing birthday-grams as King George III, and a year in a secluded mountain retreat (maverick/calligrapher/logger assistant/gardener/secretary). She has an M.A. in ethnomusicology/folklore, has worked at Smithsonian Folkways Records, Advocating Change Together, in a ton of schools, and with a pile of spiritual directors (toddlers). She lives in Minneapolis with Ray Makeever and vicariously in Massachusetts with Sophia, their rugby-obsessed college daughter. Linda makes odd stuffed animals and is on the mindfulness meditation path since her brain is on hyperdrive and her heart has few defenses against the ocean of beauty and pain that is the world.

February 14–17, 2020

Taussig_Hal_TF2020-web.jpgHal Taussig

Hal Taussig is a recently retired professor and United Methodist pastor.  The most recent of his 14 published books is Re-Reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Loss and Trauma and A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.  His mediography includes The New York Times, Time Magazine, The Daily Show, People Magazine, Newsweek Magazine, National Public Radio, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC, the Bob Edwards Show on Sirius Radio, The History Channel, and the Washington Post.  In additional to speaking gigs around the country and internationally, he is a consultant for his bishop as a consultant in strategic planning.

CP_TF2020_web.jpgChuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman

As Executive Directors of Holden Village, we have lived our life at the boundary of wildness and community. Our time here has fine-tuned some perceptions that have always resonated within our bones. Whatever power gave rise to the stars, to the earth, to life, permeates and nourishes all things.

Our art and work are the result of collaboration. Our art goes beyond the conceptual sense, to include working together on the same canvas.

We paint at the same time, forging ideas together that of us could create alone. We experience this as both visual and verbal communication. We begin our conversation in paint, letting each of our voices to be heard, allowing expression of our unique perspectives. Chaos seems to be necessary to get to the deeper order that unifies our work. Because we know that ideas usually don’t move in a straight line, we make intentional space for a more organic and flowing nature to take hold. Sometimes it takes courage, faith and a time to allow ourselves to be transformed by the process. We have found that our usual rushed and me focused behavior finally gives way to the quiet gift of being together. We bring this process into our talks and workshops where we create paintings in large groups, much the same way we create our own work.

In life and in conversation, things can get messy. The visual language of color and shape helps us think about larger issues together. Perhaps it is because most of this conversation takes place on the visual right side of our brains, rather than the verbal side. When we look at our result, we see evidence of our individuality, as well as the presence of a third dimension–more than the sum of our two parts. We are always surprised by what we have painted together and what we find in common. It is what we call Painting as Prayer.

Sessions
A R T. E A R T H. S P I R I T
Using language of shape, form, and color we will reach into the landscape of the earth and deeper, into our silence, to touch where Spirit takes form. The artist’s role is to listen and respond not only to our own inner voice but also the presence of the unseen. The art becomes dialogue between artist, materials, the divine and eventually the viewer. This workshop is for all levels of artistic ability.

March 2–6, 2020

deJonge-Kannan_Karin_TF2020-web.jpgKarin deJonge-Kannan

Dr. Karin deJonge-Kannan was born in the Netherlands and raised in the Gereformeerde Kerk there. Following her move to the USA for academic pursuits  – resulting in a PhD in Linguistics – she explored various denominations and came to appreciate the value of each.  Upon exchanging a position at Eastern Mennonite University in Virginia for a position at Utah State University (USU) in 2000, she joined Prince of Peace Lutheran Church (ELCA) in Logan, UT, where she has served in multiple lay ministry roles, including as lay preacher.  Dr. deJonge-Kannan is an unapologetic "word nerd" who agrees wholeheartedly with Steven Pinker's claim that humans are "verbivores - creatures that live on words", and Ben Okri's statement that we are "homo fabula - a storytelling species".  Interested especially in the sociolinguistic aspects of religious practice, Dr. deJonge-Kannan regularly teaches a university course in Language & Religion, among others.  She also participates in USU's Interfaith Initiative. She was recently awarded USU's Teacher of the Year. She has presented her work at the Parliament of World Religions in Toronto (2018) and attended the interfaith sessions at the United Nations' Civil Society Conference in Salt Lake City (2019).

Sessions
Is religion weird? Exploring how and why people choose (not) to be religious
For outsiders (and some insiders, too!), a religion often has weird aspects - maybe religion itself is weird? Why do some people refrain from participating in a faith tradition or engaging in spiritual practices, while others cannot imagine a life without their faith tradition or spiritual practice? Join us for this conversation.

Speed-faithing: Can “nones”, doubters, seekers, and believers talk to each other?
New to "speed-faithing"? Come and participate to find out how it fosters dialog. Everyone welcome, no prior experience with a faith tradition or spiritual practice needed.

A public university course as a space for interfaith exploration: How and Why?
Without understanding the power of religion and spiritual practices in the lives of individuals and societies, can a person be considered educated for the world today ? If a course could be designed to help college students develop this kind of understanding, how could it be made deeply engaging and personally relevant to all students regardless of their background? Come and join the conversation.

March 9–13, 2020

Carrasco_Octavio_TF2020-web.jpgOctavio Carrasco

Octavio Pascal Carrasco is an historian of American culture and music with special interest in the processes of social change, cultural resistance, and the religious imagination. As an undergraduate student at Princeton University, he was blessed to work with Cornel West, exploring the religious dimensions of Tupac Shakur’s music and death. He completed his Masters Degree at Starr King School for the Ministry in Berkeley, CA with Rev. Dr. Gabriella Lettini. As the ’11-’12 Hilda Mason teaching fellow he developed and taught the course “Music & Art for Social Change.” He was further blessed to complete his PhD work with Br. West, Daisy Machado, and Troy Messenger at Union Theological Seminary in NY, focusing on “the long sixties” as a period of profound awakening in American history. Octavio’s primary mode of transportation is walking, using the “eyes in his feet” to remain connected with his surroundings. His academic studies are grounded in his time living in Guatemala, Spain (Barcelona is his favorite world city!) and the Czech Republic. He can be found teaching English as a second language wherever there are students and juggling book loans at ALL the local libraries.

Sessions
Borderlands: Conquest, Immigration and the Residue of History
The history of the United States is marked by cultural encounters, collisions and exchanges. Place names reveal a complicated Indigenous-European past that precedes the establishment of the country, just as architecture and culture retain shadows and reflections of an unrecognized past. The borderlands exists as a historical reality from the colonial era, while shaping the politics of the present. The borderlands, of course, are also a place; home to a rich and ever developing culture of mestizaje. This presentation will put forward a borderlands framework to more comprehensively think about the land and the people who used to live here, and what that legacy means for us. To focus our session, we will look at the example of the rituals of conquest and resistance around the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico to open up this concept and encourage discussion and reflection.

It May Be the Devil, or It May Be the Lord”: The Religious Dimensions of Popular Music
In what ways does music speak to, or provide a vehicle for, the religious experience? Does music evoke the sublime, or does it corrupt the performers and listeners? These are questions that have been debated for 1000 years or more in worship settings. This session will explore the historical development of music, the nature of music, the potential of the musical sphere, and the discourse around music’s social and spiritual power in society. 

The Long 1960s: Awakenings, Social Change and the Music
The 1960s in the United States were a time of turmoil and “change” with religious, social, musical and political implications for the present. This course will explore the Sixties through the songs that framed, responded to and have come to represent the era. We will start with the songs of the Civil Rights Movement, and move to the music of the counterculture. Using music as a primary historical source, we will explore the social movements of the Sixties and discuss the relationship between music and social change.

March 30 – April 4, 2020

Del_Pozo_Jessica_TF2020-web.jpgJessica Del Pozo

Jessica Del Pozo, PhD, is a clinical psychologist who has worked with diverse populations at Kaiser Permanente and Chapa de Indian Health Care in pain management, cardiac rehabilitation, insomnia, gasterointestinal disorders, anxiety and depression for the past 20 years. Although born in Minnesota and raised in Wisconsin, she has been living in Northern California for the past 15 years. In addition to directing pain management programs, she has also taught community wellness classes and specialized education courses for professionals to mitigate burn-out, improve self-care through mindfulness practice, behavior change, values exercises and goal-setting. As a member of the Placer County Mental Health, Alcohol and Drug Advisory Board, she has opportunities monthly to be involved in the health of her own community working for trauma-informed care and reduction of health care disparities.

Dr. Del Pozo has worked with Native American, Vietnamese, Hispanic, African American, and women's groups, teaching and ever learning how to use integrative and culturally aware approaches, empower individuals and groups to navigate personal and societal challenges that affect the health of individuals and communities. She assists patients, clinicians, and communities to develop goals from their values and move toward positive change. Her teaching style is inclusive, practical, interactive, experiential and fun.

Sessions
Reforming Ourselves: Self-care for Caregivers, Leaders, and Activists
This course starts with three questions: 1) What has led me to the place I am right now? 2) What is working well for me and what is not? 3) Where do I want to go from here?Reforming ourselves is where we begin. Reforming our relationship with ourselves starts with developing our capacity for self-awareness through mindfulness practice.This course is a mix of didactic and experiential learning with the goal of mitigating burn-out and improving health through understanding human physiological rhythms, making realistic behavioral changes, and alligning values and goals to reform our future.

April 13–19, 2020

Fontana_Kate_TF2020-web.jpgKate Fontana

Kate Fontana (she/her/hers) believes that healing at the bodily level is intimately linked with healing at the interpersonal, systemic, and planetary level, and longs for a thriving, just, diverse, harmonious world for all beings everywhere.  She is personally enamored by the queerness of Jesus’ life, which is what keeps her identifying as a Christian most days.  Her journey has been a weave of music, yoga, contemplative practice, therapy, friendship, ecology, and profoundly uncomfortable and slow racial awakenings.  She is currently a Master of Divinity student at the Seattle School of Theology and Psychology, and is a candidate for the priesthood with the Roman Catholic Women Priests.  She is also the co-founder of the Sanctuary Northwest, which aims to transform the lives of trauma survivors and to nurture strong resilient families, communities, and ecosystems where all life thrives. She has trained in Cultural Somatics with Tada Hozumi.  Additional teachers and mentors in embodiment, sacred activism, and racial justice include Yvette Murrell, Dr. Caprice Hollins, Denise Benitez, and Will and Cynthia Keepin.  She also draws on a theological blend of Harry Potter, the Bhagavad Gita, quantum physics, Battlestar Galactica, adrienne maree brown’s Pleasure Activism, deep ecology, and the Gospels.

Sessions
Body, Spirit, Race: Healing Whiteness with Somatics and Spirituality
Cultural Somatics is an emerging field seeking to address the links between cultural/systemic traumas—racism, sexism, transphobia, etc—and where/how they manifest in the physiology of individual bodies.  This series is designed as an experiential dive into the individual and collective soma (body), specifically, where one's body keeps the record of one's ancestral and collective wounds as well as wisdom and resources.  This is series is designed for any spiritually-inclined folks impacted by whiteness; who are troubled by white supremacy and racism and want to do something about it, but struggle to know just what to do; or who are currently engaged in racial justice work and desire more tools for sustainability, resilience, stamina and burnout-prevention.  This is a gentle, trauma-informed learning journey supported by tools of somatic awareness, movement, earth-based inter-spiritual practice, and creative expression; and grounded in principles of trauma resilience and cultural attachment theory.

April 26 – May 9, 2020

Hergert_John_TF2020-web.jpgJohn Hergert

John has been an ordained pastor for over 35 years in the ELCA. He was raised in a small town in Eastern WA surrounded by bountiful farmland nurtured by the immigrants who came there in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, made up of ethnic Germans who had lived in Russia. John attended Texas Lutheran University in Seguin, Texas receiving a BA in Theology and completed his MDIV at Trinity Lutheran Seminary in Columbus, Ohio. He has served congregations in PA, MD, ID, WA and now AK, mostly as a regularly called pastor, but has done four interims, including Shishmaref, AK. He has been actively involved in social justice issues, traveling to South Africa/Namibia during the Apartheid regime. He has marched and spoken at events calling for justice. He was once arrested at the South African Embassy in DC along with 80 other Lutherans. John served on the Pasco School Board for 13 years demonstrating a commitment to the children of that community. He lived in Holden Village for over a year before, during and after the Wolverine Fire. John has a passion for writing and speaking truth to power and the Gospel.

Sessions
Living, Listening & Learning in Shishmaref AK
During a six month period in 2019 John served as an interim pastor in the northernmost congregation in the ELCA, Shishmaref, AK. This is a community that is endangered by rising sea levels caused by climate change. He will tell of his deep transformation during the time he served as their pastor. He will speak of hearing the stories of these ancient and wonderful people who see their way of life being destroyed.

May 3–9, 2020

Kathleen Grimbly

Kathleen began practicing yoga as a teenager.  Throughout her sixty four years this passion and teaching has taken her places like Holden and Massachusetts, healed her pain and saved her life.  After twenty years as a kayak guide and outfitter she spent twenty years with undiagnosed Lyme disease complex, with five whiplash injuries sprinkled throughout.  Chronic pain invited her to study structural yoga therapy and the Egoscue Method of realignment.  She's working on writing her memoir, about kayaking with Orca whales, the health of the Salish Sea and healing from Lyme.  Her favorite quote from C.S. Lewis is "Pain is God's megaphone."

Sessions
Our Design Function: Healing Pain, Posture & Limitation
While diverse in many ways, we share a design that keeps us functional and free.  Aging and injury can interfere, but there is no reason we can't sustain that design for a lifetime.  Learn to identify postural changes in yourself and others, the many ways these affect our lives and a few practices for whole body realignment that anyone can do.  We'll identify meditations and "mantras" that help us let go into healing.

Yoga Walk: Asana & Meditation for walking
We'll begin with practices that balance and warm our bodies for being present in our walking practice.  Then a meditative walk on Holden trails takes us into the presence of nature, of which we are a part.  Finally, we'll end with a few brief postures to rebalance our bodies and ground our experience. 

Lie down in peace: restoratives
Often when we travel it's challenging to sleep restfully when we arrive.  Begin your first evening at Holden in restorative postures (in your 'jammies, if you like!)  that calm the central nervous system and restore alignment after sitting.  We'll meditate on readings from "Prayers of the Cosmos", and end with yoga Nidra.

SUMMER 2020

June 7–13, 2020

Railroad Creek Chamber Music Festival

Brobst-Renaud_Mandy_TF2020_web.jpgMandy Brobst-Renaud

Amanda “Mandy” Brobst-Renaud is Assistant Professor of Theology at Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, Indiana. She is an ordained pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) and served as a parish pastor for five years in Malone, Texas.

Mandy’s teaching and scholarly work is in the New Testament, specifically, the Gospel of Luke. Her particular interest in rhetoric—how the biblical authors communicate—undergirds the question of why the authors chose to communicate the ways they did. Ultimately, it is her curiosity about the Bible and the ways in which it engages ancient and modern audiences alike that drives her research. The parables hold particular interest for Professor Brobst-Renaud, especially how these stories possess the capacity to engage and transform their audiences.

Sessions
Moral Formation and Re-Formation in the Parables of Jesus
When we engage beloved stories preserved in the parables, it is tempting to believe that we have fully digested and understood the parables. But what if the parables have more to say to us? In these sessions, Rev. Dr. Brobst-Renaud will guide attendees through the ways in which the parables form and re-form their audiences. Through an thorough engagement of the Lukan parables, attendees will learn how Luke forms and re-forms his audiences (ancient and modern) into more generous—even recklessly generous—communities.

Hartke_Austen_TF2020-web.jpgAusten Hartke

Austen Hartke is the author of Transforming: The Bible and the Lives of Transgender Christians, a new book on theology and personal narratives published by Westminster John Knox Press in 2018. He is also the creator of the YouTube series Transgender and Christian, which seeks to understand, interpret, and share parts of the Bible that relate to gender identity and the lives of transgender individuals. Austen is a graduate of Luther Seminary’s Master of Arts program in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible Studies, and is the winner of the 2014 John Milton Prize in Old Testament Writing from the same institution. He has spoken at conferences all over the country, including The Reformation Project Conferences in 2014 and 2017, the Philadelphia Transgender Wellness Conference in 2016 and 2018, and the 2018 Why Christian Conference. He also enjoys speaking at colleges and universities, and working with gender-diverse youth and families as the Faith Coordinator for the nonprofit group Gender Spectrum. As a transgender person of faith, Austen's greatest passion is helping other trans and gender-non-conforming people see themselves in scripture.

Sessions
Reconstructing Community with our Transgender Siblings
Has someone in your church come out as transgender and you're not really sure what that means? Have you heard about Deuteronomy 22:5, but you're left wondering if that's really the last word on gender diversity? Maybe your church is already LGBTQ+ affirming, but you're not sure where to go from here. This course will give you the language and history you need to understand gender diversity in our modern context, as well as a place to wrestle with your questions. Come explore the biblical texts related to gender identity, find out how transgender people of faith are bringing in the Kingdom, and learn what you and your community can do to help.

Hanson_Mark_TF2020-web.jpgMark Hanson

Dr. Hanson grew up in the Lutheran tradition in Aberdeen, South Dakota.  His years at St. Olaf College and Yale Divinity School expanded theological and philosophical horizons, leading him to a doctorate in religious ethics at the University of Virginia.  His first professional position was as Associate for Ethics & Society at The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute in Garrison, New York.  An Outward Bound course in the wilderness of Montana was transformative, leading him to a love of wild places.  He soon found a position directing the Life’s End Institute in Missoula Montana, directing research to improve end-of-life care.  Mark’s love of teaching led him to The University of Montana, where he currently teach courses in "Ways of Knowing” in the Honors College and “Medical Ethics” at Missoula College.  He has taught several different courses in religious ethics, environmental ethics, business ethics, and the humanities in the Western tradition.  He was a commentator on Montana Public Radio and continues to write in various areas related to ethics and society.  Mark is an avid hiker, trail runner, and Nordic skier.  He and his wife Kara help their four-year-old daughter Lena discover the wonders of the wild world every day.

Sessions
Ethical Issues in Biomedicine
Current biomedical technologies raise ethical issues that are both ancient and modern.  Through exploring a range of case studies/stories, this course will help participants think through ethical, philosophical, and spiritual dimensions of caring for dying loved ones, biotechnology and designing ourselves and our progeny, and justice in medical resource allocation.

Advances in biomedical technology mean that people are having to make ethical decisions unheard of in human history.  But while the situations may be new, the underlying questions have ancient roots.   What kind of power should human beings have over each other in matters of life and death?  What is life for, and are there certain kinds of life that are not worth living?  Is the effort to create and re-create ourselves the highest expression of humanity or a hubris that transcends moral and spiritual limits?  Is giving health care to others a matter of charity or a matter of social justice?

Soule_HeadShot-web.jpgDax Soule

Dr. Dax Soule is an Assistant Professor of Marine Geophysics at Queens College CUNY, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences. Dr. Soule is a field-oriented geophysicist with a background in solid earth geophysics, oceanography, and STEM education. With a degree in Geophysics from Texas A&M University and a doctorate in Oceanography from the University of Washington he has extensive experience mentoring students doing research in both the classroom and in field. Dr. Soule has served as faculty at Queens College – CUNY since 2016. Dr. Soule is currently conducting geophysical experiments in the Bransfield Strait, Antarctica and is developing machine learning techniques to analyze geophysical data collected via the Regional Cabled Array (https://interactiveoceans.washington.edu/about/regional-cabled-array/) through a collaboration with Microsoft. Dr. Soule is also a principle investigator for EDDIE (https://serc.carleton.edu/eddie/), an NSF-funded effort to develop and test active learning modules focused on high frequency environmental data and is a contributor to the NSF-funded “Hispanic Serving Institutions –STEM Bridges Across Eastern Queens”, which is redesigning introductory STEM courses to better “land” students from diverse backgrounds into the geosciences through the use of active learning pedagogy. Dr. Soule’s teaching portfolio includes introductory courses in oceanography, environmental science, and geology, upper level courses in marine geophysics and time-series analysis, and international field courses focused on environmental science, data collection, and experiential learning.

Sessions
Greenhouse Gases and Climate Change – The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly
Greenhouse gases play a critical role in our Earth climate system. In this lesson we will discuss factors that drive historical variations in the Earth’s climate with a focus on variations in the composition of our atmosphere. We will discuss what greenhouse gases are, how they work, where they come from, and where they go. 

The Holden Village Rock Rodeo
The story of Holden Village is fundamentally tied to the geologic processes that formed the North Cascades and concentrated mineral resources in the surrounding mountains. We will discuss the local geologic environment in the context of plate tectonics and the constructional processes that gave rise to the mountainous terrain.

Glaciers of the North Cascades
The North Cascades has the highest concentration of glaciers in the lower 48 states. These glaciers are an important reservoir for fresh water, which is essential for irrigation, fisheries and power generation. Climate change is threatening their existence to the point that many have disappeared and the rest show a consistent pattern of rapid glacial retreat. In this lecture we will discuss how glaciers form and move, their role in shaping the terrain of the North Cascades and the threats they currently face.  

Kraaz_Sarah_TF2020-web.jpgSarah Mahler Kraaz

Sarah Mahler Kraaz is Professor Emerita at Ripon College, Ripon, Wisconsin, where she joined the faculty in 1989.  She has taught piano, organ, and harpsichord, music history courses, Music and War, and Music and Art and has been a collaborative pianist for recitals and the Ripon College Chamber Singers. She designed and taught a Women and Music course for ten years.

Dr. Kraaz has researched and performed on historic organs in Italy, Germany, and Scotland, and has presented concerts across the United States. In 2012 and 2016, she taught courses in music and art as a visiting scholar with the Associated Colleges of the Midwest program in Florence. Most recently, she compiled and edited a textbook, Music and War in the United States, published by Routledge (Taylor and Francis group) in 2019.
 
Dr. Kraaz has composed a number of works for choir and organ solo.  She continues to write reviews and articles for The Diapason, an international journal devoted to the harpsichord, organ, and church music.  In June 2019 she offered a course in Music and War at Holden Village; in July, she presented organ workshops and a recital at the Fellowship of American Baptist Musicians (FABM) conference in Green Lake, WI. She is an adjunct instructor of organ at Ripon College.

Sessions
"And still she persisted:" Women writing Music
An historical overview of Western women who have composed and performed music despite social, educational, and cultural barriers against these traditionally male occupations. Western culture has privileged the written over the oral tradition in music, and many women who composed classical music also recorded their thoughts and experiences in journals. We will focus on women in the 19th, 20th, and 21st centuries who aspired to be professional musicians and listen to examples of their music against the backdrop of their own words and those of music critics (male) and colleagues (also mostly male). 

Women and Music in the Church
This session will focus on the contributions of women to sacred music from Hildegard of Bingen in the Middle Ages and Renaissance nuns to African American gospel singers and writers of contemporary hymn texts and tunes.

Music for change
Women musicians active in all genres of music--classical, pop, hiphop, folk, country, and others--are also actively expressing their commitment to social justice in its many aspects. Songs that address racism, poverty, marginalized populations and environmental issues have their roots in the suffrage movement of the early 20th century. We will learn about some of the artists who have created and/or performed songs of conscience and listen to their music.

Walter_Gregory_TF2020-web.jpgGregory Walter

Gregory Walter asks theological questions at the intersection of secular life, the various traditions of religious and philosophical discourses we have inherited, and what disciplined imaginings may provide us for our work in the world.He has mainly written scholarly work on gift-exchange, promise, aesthetics, sovereignty, justice, and the Trinity. Being Promised: Theology, Gift, and Practice (Eerdmans, 2013) is his first book. Along with chapters he has contributed to various volumes, he has published articles in many scholarly journals.

He has taught at St. Olaf College (Northield, Minnesota) since 2005, where he is Professor of Religion. There, he teaches courses that bring together theological inquiry, the secular, religion, and culture. He teaches various courses in the Religion department as well as in the Science Conversation and Great Conversation, two interdisciplinary learning communities.

Twice appearing on Tripp Fuller’s podcast Homebrewed Christianity, Walter has also reviewed a graphic novel, Punk Rock Jesus, regularly teaches in ELCA congregations, and serves in various capacities in the congregations where he has been a member. He enjoys board games, Icelandic murder mysteries, and keeping up with his family, and their dog.

Sessions
Spaces Walled and Places Promised
A nation, it seems, is a space where the nation controls its borders. Participants examine the logic of national power in marking space, using images, political statements, and photographs from contemporary US discourse. By contrast, participants consider the notion of place given by nature and by Jesus in the Eucharist as places that dismantle national power.

Civil, Bold, and Freeing Speech
US traditions of public speech contain contrary forces: citizens ought to share whatever they wish yet must remain civil. Boldness in speech must be trained by careful consideration of others. The roots of bold and civil speech are confounded by Paul and Luther’s reflection on the “words from the cross” which gives a freeing and liberative way of speech that responds well to contemporary criticism of bold and free speech traditions by scholars concerned with their effect on marginalized people.

God, Free us From God! The Secular Theological Imperative
Participants consider how non-religious life and ideas as a kind of secular theological imperative to focus on this life, this world, this time. This imperative can recover theological self-criticism of supernatural and other-worldly models of religious life. Participants work to understand God in a non-religious or secular way.

FriesenCarper_Dennis_TF2020-web.jpgGuest Village Musician - Dennis Friesen-Carper

Dennis is a musician devoted to fostering transcendent and transformative experiences through music. A sensitive and eclectic composer, conductor, and keyboard player, he is committed to developing the musical gifts of the community, while exploring musical genres from plainchant to rhythm and blues to African and Asian traditional music. For 25 years, he has conducted the orchestra and musical theatre, composed for choirs, orchestra and band, and taught composition, ear training, and improvisation at Valparaiso University. He has accompanied the Gospel Choir, coached string and woodwind chamber music, vocal and instrumental jazz groups, and written for the Chinese Traditional Instrument Ensemble. He has Masters and Doctoral degrees from the Shepherd School at Rice University, and a Bachelors from Bethel in North Newton, KS. He recently premiered hymn accompaniments in the styles of Perotin, Ellington, and Corea at Gloria Dei Lutheran in St.Paul with his son Paul, and conducted his transcription of Confucian ceremonial music with Western and Chinese instruments in Chicago's Orchestra Hall. Currently on sabbatical from Valparaiso University, he is conducting, teaching, and building creative collaborations at Shanghai University for fall 2019.

Gockel_Janice_TF2020-web.jpgRailroad Creek Chamber Music Festival – Janice Gockel

Janice Gockel’s love affair with chamber music began in junior high school.  It was enhanced by eight summers of study at the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, including private lessons with Sally Peck and William Primrose and chamber music with Gabor Rejto,  Jerome Lowenthal, and Mitchel Lurie.   Janice holds degrees in viola performance from Augustana College, Rock Island, and Wichita State University.

Her love affair with Holden Village began in the 1980’s when she brought students from her congregation to a Youth Weekend, having heard of Holden from Beany Lundholm, her theory professor at Augustana. She’s returned numerous times as guest and as volunteer, and the violin and/or viola always comes along, plus a stack of chamber music in case she finds like minded musicians – which happens more often than not.  Always the musical instigator, Janice encourages and participates in  ensembles to play at Vespers or coffee break, for variety shows, or just for fun.   Holden’s  musical spontanaiety even led to a performance of Vivaldi’s “Gloria” accompanied by more than a dozen players.

Winder_Nancy_TF2020-web.jpgRailroad Creek Chamber Music Festival – Nancy Winder

Music has always been part of Nancy Winder’s life. She started violin at age 10 and studied in Seattle with E.C. Knutson and Marilyn Garner. She played in Seattle Public School All-City orchestras, but never auditioned for the Seattle Youth Symphony because they rehearsed on Saturdays and she wanted to ski. Turned out string-playing was the higher skill! At St. Olaf College she played violin in the orchestra, switching to viola her junior year. She studied both with M. Beatrix Lien. She brought her guitar along when she came to Holden on volunteer staff in 1971 and was surprised and excited to see all the other instruments and musical styles in the Village! She returned that summer with her violin and has been bringing her violin and now viola with her whenever she comes to Holden. There are always wonderful opportunities to make music! Nancy also studied viola with Donald McInnes and has played with most of the amateur/semi-professional orchestras in the Seattle area. 

June 14–20, 2020

Schifferdecker_Kathryn_TF2020_web.jpgKathryn Schifferdecker

Kathryn Schifferdecker is an Associate Professor of Old Testament at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN. She is also an ordained ELCA pastor, having served rural parishes in Iowa and Wisconsin. Her teaching interests include biblical narrative, creation theology, preaching, and questions of suffering. Along with her husband and three children, she enjoys hiking, backpacking, gardening, and watching movies.

Sessions
Sabbath and the Land
"Remember the Sabbath day and keep it holy." It is a commandment that might sound quaint to our ears, related to "blue laws" of bygone days. But it is, in fact, a word of promise to our world and our culture, laboring under the yoke of "more" and "faster." The Sabbath commandment calls us to sanity and to freedom. It calls us to rest, real rest. And it calls us to know that we and this world belong to God. We will explore biblical texts that speak of Sabbath, the land, and our relationship to the land, and ponder what they might mean for us and for our world today.

Taussig_Hal_TF2020-web.jpgHal Taussig

Hal Taussig is a recently retired professor and United Methodist pastor.  The most recent of his 14 published books is Re-Reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Loss and Trauma and A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.  His mediography includes The New York Times, Time Magazine, The Daily Show, People Magazine, Newsweek Magazine, National Public Radio, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC, the Bob Edwards Show on Sirius Radio, The History Channel, and the Washington Post.  In additional to speaking gigs around the country and internationally, he is a consultant for his bishop as a consultant in strategic planning.

Bateza_Anthony_TF2020-web.jpgAnthony Bateza

Anthony Bateza earned degrees from Iowa State University (B.S, 2002), Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (M.Div., 2006), and Princeton Theological Seminary (Ph.D., 2017).

Dr. Bateza is a specialist in Martin Luther, moral theology and Christian ethics. His research examines Luther’s understanding of human agency and his relationship with the virtue tradition. His other scholarly interests include the broader Augustinian tradition, the impact of Luther’s thought on 19th century philosophy, and questions of race, identity, and social justice.

Anthony is an ordained pastor in the Lutheran Church (ELCA). He lives in Northfield with his wife, Cynthia, and two young children, Austen and Magdalene. In his free time he enjoys cycling, board games, gardening and cooking.

Smith_Claire_TF2020-web.jpgClaire Smith

Claire holds her BA in English Literature and Hispanic Studies and her Masters of Social Work from the University of Washington. She received her training in intercultural capacity building from the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship and Kaleidoscope Institute, and has been honing her facilitation practice with an amazing Community of Practice in the Seattle area. Claire spent two years serving with Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest gaining experience advocating with Latinx survivors of intimate partner violence and academically supporting young people on the Crow Reservation in St. Xavier, MT. She has known and loved Holden for many years, and is excited to connect with retreat attendees.

Kitahata_Stacy_TF2020-web2.jpgStacy Kitahata

A graduate of UCLA and McCormick Theological Seminary, Stacy comes with over 25 years of leadership experience with faith communities, grassroots organizations and higher education. She served as Dean of Community at the Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago and as director of the Center for Community Engagement at Trinity Lutheran College. She also served as outreach staff with the synods of Region 1. She currently serves as Program Director for the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship, designing and conducting intercultural experiential leadership development.

Tibbs_Taylor_TF2020-web.jpgTaylor Tibbs

Taylor Tibbs (She/They) is a native of South Seattle and graduate of Seattle University. Since 2014, Taylor has worked in Tacoma, WA with the Act Six Scholarship and Leadership Initiative to support students from ethnically and economically diverse communities attending Predominantly White Institutions. In addition to directing the Act Six Program, Taylor facilitates trainings on cultural competency with the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship (where she also serves as Board Chair), is an active giving member to the Social Justice Fund Northwest’s Black-Led Giving Project and serves on the Advisory Committee for Puget Sound Sage's Community Leadership Institute. They believe that their liberation as a Black and Queer Person is deeply tied to the liberation of all people in their community.

Cherland_Elisabeth_TF2020_web.jpgElisabeth Cherland – Guest Village Musician

Elisabeth Cherland is a fourth-generation choral conductor as well as singer, song leader, violinist, music educator, and Lutheran church musician. She lives out these callings as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Music at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota. In addition to teaching choral methods, conducting, and music theory, she conducts the Choir of Christ Chapel and the Lucia Singers.

Elisabeth earned a Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Choral Conducting at the University of Washington, a Master of Music Education with Certification degree from VanderCook College of Music, and a Bachelor of Arts in Music and English from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. A passionate and dedicated teacher, she taught choir and band at the middle and high school levels in South Dakota for 7 years, as well as private violin, voice, and piano lessons. She has served as soprano section leader for both the Concordia Choir where she studied with René Clausen, and the Rockefeller Chapel Choir in Chicago under the direction of Randi Ellefson and James Kallembach. While in Seattle she was a frequent soprano and violin soloist with the University of Washington choirs. Elisabeth’s research interests include women in academia, narrative research, choral settings of Emily Dickinson poetry, and song leading. Prior to her studies in Seattle, Elisabeth and her family spent two years at Holden Village, a Lutheran retreat center near Chelan, Washington where she was the Village Musician.

She lives with her partner Kent and their two sons, Elijah and Leif, in St. Peter. She loves doughnuts, bubble tea, laughing, knitting, running (when the temperature is perfect and the course is flat), and sunshine when it’s available.

Taussig_Markus_TF2020-web.jpgMarkus Taussig & Vivek Tandon

Markus Taussig is an Associate Professor of Management and Global Business at Rutgers Business School. He currently lives in West Philadelphia, the neighborhood he grew up in, but in-between lived in Southeast Asia for nearly two decades, including 11 years in Vietnam and 6 years in Singapore. In Vietnam, he worked for a variety of international development organizations, including the World Bank, International Finance Corporation, and The Asia Foundation, and worked closely with many local government and NGO partners. These projects included designing and carrying out surveys of Vietnam’s nascent domestic private business sector and doing operational audits and business planning with state-owned enterprises slated for privatization. His research on engagement between businesses, government, and other societal stakeholders has been published in leading management, political science, and economics journals and won best paper awards from the Academy of Management and the Community for Responsible Research for Business and Management. He has also received numerous fellowships, including the Fulbright Fellowship, and large grants for experimental research from JPAL and from private foundations. He received his Doctorate of Business Administration from Harvard Business School and his Masters in International Economics from Johns Hopkins’ Paul Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

Tandon_Vivek_TF2020_web.jpgDr. Vivek Tandon is an Assistant Professor of Strategic Management at Fox school of Business in Temple University, where he has led courses on entrepreneurship and technological innovation since 2017. His research papers have appeared in prominent publications, like The Academy of Management Annals, Strategic Management Journal, Journal of Management and Organization Science. His dissertation was the runner up in the INFORMS Doctoral Dissertation Award in the Technology, Innovation Management and Entrepreneurship section. His research interests include management of innovation, technology strategy, technological search and evolution, inventors' incentives, and mobility. He also serves on the editorial review boards for Strategic Management Journal, Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, and Organization Science.  Dr. Tandon earned his PhD in Business Administration, with a specialization in Strategy, from the University of Michigan. He received his Bachelor of Technology degree in Computer Science and Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology. Before coming an academic he worked as a research scientist in West Coast Bay Area and holds two patents from his work in that life.

Sessions
Business at the Bottom of the Pyramid: The Case of India
Renowned management scholar CK Prahalad coined the term “Bottom of the Pyramid” to refer to the opportunities for business to do good by profitably serving the poor. This has spawned a number of enthusiastic attempts by entrepreneurs and large multiationals alike to develop BOP businesses. While some such ventures truly help the poor, many ethical conundrums accompany these attempts. We will discuss the basic premises of the BOP concept and what trade-offs accompany these attempts, including a rather pointed critique by Karnani, a former colleague of Prahalad's.

Stakeholder Management & Mining in Indonesia
Mining is always a complicated business that significantly affects communities and the environment, but the Grasberg mine, developed by American company, Freeport McMoRan, may take the cake. This session aims to walk through the many challenges faced by Freeport and to grapple with what corporate social responsibility would even look like if Freeport were to fully dedicate itself to this goal. We will walk through and discuss  the goals and incentives of the many players involved.

Intellectual Property Rights and Health Care in India
Intellectual property rights in emerging economies has become a subject of much concern and debate in the West, especially worries that weaknesses in IP rights siphon away profits that should legitimately belong to the innovators who are typically Western firms. In this regard, Western firms and governments exert considerable pressure on emerging economy governments to strengthen their IP rights. This is also supposed to help provide incentives to emerging economy firms to innovate. But is this true? In this session we look deeply at the complications involved in strengthening IP regimes in emerging economies, with special focus on the case of health care in India.

Jothen_Peder_TF2020-web.jpgPeder Jothen

Peder Jothen teaches at St. Olaf College, where he teaches in the Religion Department as well as the Great Conversation, a great books program. His interests focus on the intersection between ethics, theology, and art, particularly through the thought of Søren Kierkegaard. He likes to ask questions about the shape of a good life, especially in relation to the creation and interpretation of art. His hope is to help us see our lives as an on-going work of art, in which living justly is a partnership between divine/human creativity that calls us to be responsible towards our neighbors and creation. His first book, "Kierkegaard, Selfhood, and Aesthetics: The Art of Subjectivity" was published in 2014. He is married to Kaethe Schwehn, a creative writer who teaches in the English Department at St. Olaf, and has two delightful children, Thisbe and Matteus.

Sessions
“Degenerate” Art as Religious Art
Contemporary art often strives to lead us to question our assumptions, including about God. Works like Piss Christ or The Holy Virgin Mary (made with elephant dung) push the boundaries of traditional, orthodox understandings of religious figures. Such works have been called heretical and degenerate. This session will explore these artworks in relation to theological claims about God. Might such controversial works be a needed reminder on the limits of our theological musings? How do they relate to issues like race, class, and gender as key points for experiencing God? Are these works actually necessary pieces of religious art? Thinkers such as Kierkegaard, Tillich, and Caputo will help us think through such questions. 

Would Jesus be Willing to be Painted?
This session asks us to reflect on issues surrounding the connection between art and ethics. We will focus on a question Kierkegaard asks in his text "Practice in Christianity": would Jesus sit to have his portrait painted? How could a painter find the focus to paint him, knowing that Jesus was working towards creating a just world at all times? Kierkegaard's problematizes such activity, arguing that Jesus would be too pre-occupied with social justice and the marginalized to sit for a portrait. Through these questions, we can ask about the tensions between human creativity and social justice. How can we better link both activities within our lives as Christians? Can art form us to re-form the world according to God's vision for creation?

Can Beauty Make us Good?
Echoing the thought of Plato, a recent book, titled "On Beauty and Being Just" argues that the experience of beauty can de-center us, making us strive to create a just world because we desire to see the harmony within beauty throughout our lives. Yet, the text never links beauty with God's creativity, assuming the experience of beauty itself is cause enough to motivate us to be just. How might Christians respond to this claim? Does worldly beauty, independently of God, have such a power? Can beauty on its own (say Railroad Creek Valley) form us as just creatures? Thinkers included this conversation will be Augustine, Christian Wiman, Simone Weil, and the scientist Richard Frum.

Schwehn_Kaethe_TF2020_web2.jpgKaethe Schwehn

Kaethe Schwehn is the author of the post-apocalyptic novel The Rending and the Nest, a collection of poems entitled Tanka & Me, and a memoir, Tailings, which details a year she spent living at Holden from 2001-2002.  Kaethe teaches at St. Olaf College and lives in Northfield with her husband and two children.

Sessions:
Writing Delight
In the midst of the climate crisis, political divides, racial discrimination, gun violence, and rising rates of depression and anxiety–we're going to spend this week writing about delight. Using selections from Ross Gay's "Book of Delights" as springboards, we are going to write about the foods and objects and people and places and gestures that bring us delight (and joy and awe and wonder). And we're going to talk about why, at this particular moment, turning toward delight is not a superficial exercise but a necessity for our spiritual survival. Each session will feature different writing prompts; you are welcome to attend just one session or all of them. Although everyone will be encouraged to write you are also welcome to come and listen.  Join us!  Be delighted!

Hanson_Mark_TF2020-web.jpgMark Hanson

Dr. Hanson grew up in the Lutheran tradition in Aberdeen, South Dakota.  His years at St. Olaf College and Yale Divinity School expanded theological and philosophical horizons, leading him to a doctorate in religious ethics at the University of Virginia.  His first professional position was as Associate for Ethics & Society at The Hastings Center, a bioethics research institute in Garrison, New York.  An Outward Bound course in the wilderness of Montana was transformative, leading him to a love of wild places.  He soon found a position directing the Life’s End Institute in Missoula Montana, directing research to improve end-of-life care.  Mark’s love of teaching led him to The University of Montana, where he currently teach courses in "Ways of Knowing” in the Honors College and  “Medical Ethics” at Missoula College.  He has taught several different courses in religious ethics, environmental ethics, business ethics, and the humanities in the Western tradition.  He was a commentator on Montana Public Radio and continues to write in various areas related to ethics and society.  Mark is an avid hiker, trail runner, and Nordic skier.  He and his wife Kara help their four-year-old daughter Lena discover the wonders of the wild world every day.

Sessions
Climate Change and Who We Are
What does the phenomenon of climate change reveal about who we are?  This course will explore aspects of our common humanity that make solving climate change so difficult.  Individual sessions will focus specifically on identifying obstacles within ourselves, followed by exploring possible moral and spiritual responses to facilitate constructive change within ourselves, our communities, and across our world. Climate change presents humanity with perhaps its greatest challenge.  It is a problem that requires national and global solutions at a time when political division seems as strong as ever.

This session will begin by exploring why the issue is so difficult to resolve.  The reasons relate to the nature of the problem—for example, in its spanning of time, distance, and cause and effect—but also to the characteristics of our human selves.  These include tendencies to place loyalty to individual or group identities over scientific evidence, difficulties in sacrificing for future generations, lack of empathy for distant peoples, and so on. We will also explore how conservatives and liberals elevate different moral values.

June 21–27, 2020

Haiti Focus Week 


Deifelt_Wanda_TF2020-web.jpgWanda Deifelt - Luther College religion department














Mathurin_Jean_Paleme_TF2020_web.jpgJean Paleme Mathurin - Former Adviser to the Haitian Prime Minister







Dorvilier_Mytch_TF2020-web2.jpgMytch Dorvilier

Mytch Pierre-Noel Dorvilier is an ordained minister in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. She is currently serving as the Interim Pastor at Messiah Lutheran and Moe Lutheran in Roseau, Minnesota. With a passion for serving the last, the lost and the least, Dorvilier is a committed community member with a special interest in refugee resettlement, multicultural settings, interreligious dialogue and addressing issues of racial injustice. She is also a dancer and always eager to share her Haitian culture with others.

Cangas_Walnes_TF2020-web.jpgWalnes Cangas - Assistant Director of St. Joseph’s Home for Boys






Nathan_Bill_TF2020-web.jpgBill Nathan

Bill Nathan is a 35 year old Haitian young man whose life has taken him  from being an orphan at the young age of six years old, in a third world country, to a professional drummer performing at churches and universities in the United States.  Bill was forced into slavery after the death of his mother.  Details of his life as a restavek (slave child) and his survival during the January 2010 Haitian Earthquake are chronicled in a book titled “Drummer Bill.”

St. Joseph’s Home helped to educate and developed Bill into being an effective leader.  He is presently the Director of St. Joseph’s Home /Guest House.  Bill speaks excellent English and is able to communicate very effectively with American guests.

In 2002, Bill, as part of The Resurrection Dancers, performed for Pope John Paul II at the World Youth Day in Toronto.  An opportunity arose for Bill to study drumming in Senegal & Gambia Africa.  Later on, he was able to share his giftedness in Bahia Salvador, Brazil, teaching drumming.  

Bill has travel extensively throughout the United States sharing his story of “God’s Miracle” of preserving his life after falling 70 feet to the ground in the January 2010 Haitian Earthquake. Bill continue to give back to his Haitian brothers and sisters through his work with the Cabrini Ministry based in Jacmel, Haiti and the St. Joseph Community Center base in Port au Prince, Haiti. Bill is an excellent storyteller as well as being a “World Class” drummer.

Sessions
Dream Big, Invest in People, Pay it Forward
Sharing Haitian History and culture. Music and art have helped the Haitians to overcome many hardships and has given them strength to go beyond themselves.  Teaching the families in Haiti through the children and mothers how to work together in community. Teaching visitors to Haiti what a blessing it is to Pay it forward.

Werlin_Steven_TF2020_web.jpgSteve Werlin

Since 2010, Steven has been living in a small town in central Haiti, working for Fonkoze, a Haitian non-profit foundation, and its program to accompany families living in ultra-poverty as they take their first steps forward. He was first a field manager, and now is the program’s Communication and Learning Officer.

He moved to Haiti full-time in 2005 to collaborate with a range of alternative-education programs, after splitting nine years between work in Haiti and a teaching position at Shimer College, in Illinois, where he spent his last seven semesters as Dean.

Born and raised near Boston, he studied Liberal Arts and then European Philosophy at schools in Maryland, Germany, and Illinois. His 2016 book, To Fool the Rain, describes the paths that rural Haitian women living in the most extreme poverty take as they struggle to improve their lives: the barriers they encounter, the work that brings them progress, and the lengths that his coworkers go to to help the women succeed. When he has time, he likes to read long novels and sip coffee on front porches in various parts of Haiti.

Sessions
Rural Poverty in Haiti and the Path to a Better Life
Every day for 12 years, a staff of Haitian professionals has been showing in ways small and large that the existence of ultra-poverty is a choice that we all make. Ultra-poverty is the worst form of extreme poverty. Over 80,000,000 families are estimated to live in ultra-poverty around the world. And there is no reason for their situation to continue. In Haiti, a well-designed package of supports and accompaniment has helped over 6,000 of the poorest families in the world take the first steps forward towards improved lives. Learn about rural poverty in Haiti and a solution to ultra-poverty that's been proven to work not just in Haiti, but in countries around the world. Consider the kind of engagement that could eliminate the scourge of ultra-poverty.

How to find the poorest families: Different sorts of wealth, different levels of poverty.
Serving the poorest families effectively means, first, identifying who they are. It means finding them. But to identify families who live in ultra-poverty and distinguish them from other poor families is challenging. Learn about a procedure used to categorize rural Haitian families by their wealth,but also but the various ways that rural Haitians define wealth. Participating in wealth ranking pushes us to reflect upon our own ways of defining wealth and our attitudes towards what is, whether we like it or not, one of the defining aspects of our lives.

The Problem of Resilience: Wonder and the Call to Act
People flourish under circumstances so difficult that we can hardly imagine them. Extreme conditions we doubt we could survive become familiar, even ordinary, to those who live them every day. Faced with stories of remarkable perseverance, we can be inclined to let the admiration we feel blind us to the connection between indifference to our neighbors' lots and the difficulty of their struggle. Hear stories of Haitians whose strength has enabled to overcome different sorts of extreme adversity, but also learn about the price paid as they've struggled to thrive. Let's talk about resilience, its sources but also the demands it makes.

Rasmussen_Larry_TF2020-web.jpgLarry Rasmussen

Larry L. Rasmussen is Reinhold Niebuhr Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics, Union Theological Seminary, New York City.  His book, Earth-Honoring Faith: Religious Ethics in a New Key, received the Nautilus Book Awards as the Gold Prize winner for Ecology/Environment and as the Grand Prize winner for best 2014 book overall. He has been the organizer of the decade project on Earth-Honoring Faith at Ghost Ranch. An earlier volume, Earth Community, Earth Ethics, won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in Religion of 1997. He served as a member of the Science, Ethics, and Religion Advisory Committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was a recipient of a Henry Luce Fellowship in Theology, 1998-99, the Burnice Fjellman Award for Distinguished Christian Ministries in Higher Education, the Joseph Sittler Award for Outstanding Leadership in Theological Education, and the UNITAS (Distinguished Alumnus) Award from Union Theological Seminary, New York. From 1990-2000 he served as co-moderator of the World Council of Churches unit, Justice, Peace, Creation. He and Nyla live in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They are Santa Fe County Master Gardeners.

Spencer_Dan_TF2020-web.jpgDan Spencer    

Dan Spencer is Professor of Environmental Studies and has taught at The University of Montana since 2002.  Some of his areas of teaching and research interest include ecological ethics, ethical issues in ecological restoration, and globalization, justice, and environmental issues in Latin America and Southeast Asia.  He was born and raised in California, and received his B.A. in Geology from Carleton College, Minnesota in 1979, and his Masters (1983) and Ph.D. (1994) in Environmental Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, New York.  He is the author of Gay and Gaia: Ethics, Ecology and the Erotic, published by The Pilgrim Press (1996) and most recently co-authored a book with Laura Stivers and Jim Martin-Schramm: Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach, available through Orbis Press.  Dan has been teaching at Holden since 1986.

Sessions
Deep Time, Climate Change and Christian Responses
WONDER: Introduction to Thomas Berry's Universe Story
In this session, we’ll introduce the concept of “Deep Time” – what it means to be part of an evolving universe that scientists estimate to be about 13.7 billion years old.  We’ll look at the formation of the Earth and our solar system, and trace how life has emerged as a central part of Earth’s story.

JOY: The Emergence of Life. The Journey of the Universe, Part 2
In this session, we’ll finish watching The Journey of the Universe documentary, looking at the emergence of animals and the human origin story.  With the emergence of human beings and our capacity for abstract and symbolic thinking, the universe now has a member capable of reflecting on itself and discerning meaning in the universe and human stories.

CREATION: The Geological Story of the Pacific Northwest
The notion of “Deep Time” first emerged as the result of geologists studying the Earth and its history.  In this session we’ll look at the geological story of the Pacific Northwest where Holden lies – the rocks at Holden and throughout the Pacific Northwest reveal a fascinating and complex history of plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes and mountain uplift, and geological catastrophes that have shaped the world we see and live in today.

BROKENNESS: Human alienation from the Earth. Climate Change & Mass Extinctions
Deep Time and geology reveal that the Earth’s climate has changed dramatically over the course of its history – yet for billions of years the Earth has self-regulated is climate to keep it within the bounds necessary to support life.  Today one member of the Earth community – humans – is fundamentally altering Earth’s biology, geology and atmosphere, threatening the continued existence of many life forms.  We’ll look at this phenomenon and raise questions about how we might best respond to climate change challenges today.

HEALING: Learning from Earth Wisdom to Live in, on, and with the Earth
The study of fossils throughout Deep Time reveals a history of life in its amazing diversity adapting to radically different environments across billions of years.  What can we learn from these different “design strategies” about how we humans can adapt to our changing environments in ecologically sustainable ways?  The emerging field of Biomimicry studies life’s adaptive designs to help us address these critical challenges, including how to respond to climate change in ecologically sustainable ways.

Thompson_John_TF2020-web.jpgJohn Thompson   

John Thompson has a fine arts degree from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He started carving in 1990, making a carousel in Missoula Montana. He is now a printmaker that spends most of his time carving wood and some stone carving. He has been teaching printmaking workshops since 1980, and carving workshops since the early 2000s.  You can see some of his work at www.hobbyhorsearts.com.

Sessions
Beginning Relief Carving
Sessions will focus on safety, learning a bit about the wood, designing what the participants wanted to carve, fine tuning designs, carving tips, how to sharpen tools and the types of tools one might want to buy, and how to finish a carving-sanding.

Witt_Tom_and_Preus_Mary_TF2020_web.jpgTom Witt & Mary Preus – Guest Village Musicians

Mary Preus is a singer, teacher, worship leader, and choir director with a deep passion for congregational singing. As a member of the group Bread for the Journey, Mary has introduced, led, and taught the singing of diverse hymns and songs from the global church. She served as a member of the Hymnody Editorial Team for the ELCA’s Renewing Worship project. Mary is currently a guest lecturer for worship classes at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN, and a member of the chapel staff. Mary is also music director at Our Saviour’s Lutheran Church in Minneapolis, MN, worship coordinator for the ecumenical Community of St. Martin, and artistic director for Minnesota Community Sings (mnsings.com).

Tom Witt is a keyboardist, worship leader, songleader and worship planner. Tom co-founded Bread for the Journey, an ensemble committed to encouraging congregational singing, sharing music with theological integrity, and helping music ministers to inspire the community's song and serve the community's prayer. In the past, Tom has served as musician-in-residence at Holden, and as a global music consultant for the Global Mission Unit of the ELCA.  He currently is on the chapel music staff at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN. In his non-musical life, Tom is a web designer for churches and other small non-profits and also works as an International Travel Specialist at Group Travel Directors, based in Minneapolis. Tom first came to Holden in 1962 when he was 5 years old.

June 28 – July 4, 2020

Rude_Ron_TF2020_web.jpgRon Rude

Ron Rude brings creativity to Christian theology and the natural sciences, believing their interplay teaches Christians and others much about faithful/sustainable living. Recently retired as Lutheran campus pastor (ELCA) at the Univ. of AZ (2001-2018), his interests include hiking, the natural sciences, music (piano, drums, guitar), presidential history, and travel (Zimbabwe, South Africa, Palestine, Israel, Turkey, Greece, Haiti, U.K., Guatemala, Nepal, Thailand, Germany, Panama.)
Ron has taught courses at Holden Village, the Univ. of AZ's Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), Chicago Theological Seminary, Diakonia, and various forums and workshops. An author of two books - "Abel Emerging" (Beaver's Pond Press, 2010) and "Reconsidering Christianity" (Beaver's Pond Press, 2012) - his particular teaching skill is the weaving of history, biblical theology, and the natural sciences (especially astronomy, geology, evolutionary biology, paleoanthropology) into a thoughtful and practical theology for living faithfully and sustainably in God's world today.

He holds degrees from Gustavus Adolphus College (BA) and Luther Seminary (MDiv), and has served congregations in New York, Minnesota, and Colorado. His wife, Nancy, is retired from Habitat for Humanity (2002-2019). Their daughter, Angela, is a Social Worker in North Carolina, and their other daughter, Jen, is ELCA Lutheran campus pastor at Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) in Tacoma, WA.

Sessions
God's Story of Life & God's Story of Jesus
The natural sciences have opened to us new understandings of God's world. These understandings are quite different from Reformation times and even biblical worldviews. What are the implications and possibilities for seeing God's story of life and God's story of Jesus with new eyes? Our sessions will explore these fascinating questions.

Nadarajah_Suba_TF2020-web.jpgSuba Nadarajah











Brown_Will_TF2020-web.jpgWill Brown

Will Brown is a big thinker who takes the long view on most topics. He's a creative spirit with an imaginative outlook.  As an introvert, Will has a balanced skill of both effectively communicating and actively listening. After taking an intensive workshop that challenged him to reflect on his life-purpose, he had an epiphany that he wasn't living his full truth and that his creative gifts had a larger audience to serve.

In February of 2019, after twenty five fruitful years of working for two successful Fortune 500 companies – Hallmark in Kansas City and Target Corporation in Minneapolis, he left behind the golden handcuffs in pursuit of his true passion of starting an interior design studio where he helps his clients live their most beautiful lives. He does this through curating their homes and treasures to best express and encapsulate their lives and their legacy. As part of his varied creative skills he learned as a photo stylist during a myriad of photo shoots at Hallmark, is his adoration for floral arranging.

Sessions
Ikebana: A Meditative Approach to Floral Arranging
Ikebana is an art form associated with a meditative quality whereby creating an arrangement in silence or near silence can allow the designer to meditate and observe the beauty of nature and reach an inner peace. In addition to the observation of silence, the importance of honoring the negative space in the creation of the overall arrangement teaches us to see differently, holistically. Other principles of ikebana include minimalism, restraint, line, form, humanity, aesthetics and balance.

Ong_Michael_TF2020_web.jpgMichael Ong

Originally a native Malaysian, Michael Ong graduated in the US with a BFA in Graphic Design and a BS in Broadcasting and Film. He began his career as a motion designer, and eventually became the Creative Director at T2, Kansas City's once premier production and post production enterprise. In the 16 years with the company, he worked on numerous award-winning motion graphics, digital visual effects and finishing of national/regional commercials, feature films/documentaries and experience design projects.

Michael later joined the Multimedia Studio at Hallmark's headquarter in Kansas City to lead the team that delivers technologically driven digital content beyond the traditional ink-on-paper greetings. The Multimedia Studio eventually merged with the Photography Studio to expand its range of capabilities, resulting him to be the Studio Art Director/Video team lead for the new Union Hill Studios. The video team is responsible for producing all video and motion graphic content for marketing and social media content including broadcast TV commercials.

Despite Michael's primary medium of his day job, still photography has always played a big part in professional and personal life. Being an early adopter in technology, he chose to explore and focus on the ever-advancing smart phone photography. He believes in the future of smart phone photography and how it will be taken seriously in its industry. Due to his passion on this topic, he has conducted multiple "iPhoneography" workshops for adults and high school students in the recent years.

Sessions
Mastering iPhoneography: Understanding Your Tool
If you often wonder why your smartphone pictures don’t look like some smartphone pictures posted by certain Instagrammers, that is because they didn’t just point and click. This workshop will help demystify some of your questions and help you maximize the mighty tools on your fingertips. You’ll need a smartphone (duh!), and you may also need to download a couple of free or very inexpensive apps prior to the workshop. The three-part workshop consists of and two classroom sessions and a nature photowalk.

Mastering iPhoneography: Nature Photowalk & Hands-on Experience
This is a second part of the iPhoneography Workshop. Participants will get to have a hand-on experience after learning about their smartphone cameras. Together, the group will explore the nearby surroundings for various shooting scenarios. It is an active and free form workshop, where the instructor lead the photowalk, but participants are also free to break off from the group.

Mastering iPhoneography: Photo Editing
This is the hand-on photo editing session for the participants who attended Session #2. The instructor will share tips and tricks of photo editing using apps such as Snapseed and Touch Retouch. Just like darkroom technique for film photography, digital photo editing is the most crucial part of digital photography.

Spencer_Dan_TF2020-web.jpgDan Spencer

Dan Spencer is Professor of Environmental Studies and has taught at The University of Montana since 2002.  Some of his areas of teaching and research interest include ecological ethics, ethical issues in ecological restoration, and globalization, justice, and environmental issues in Latin America and Southeast Asia.  He was born and raised in California, and received his B.A. in Geology from Carleton College, Minnesota in 1979, and his Masters (1983) and Ph.D. (1994) in Environmental Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, New York.  He is the author of Gay and Gaia: Ethics, Ecology and the Erotic, published by The Pilgrim Press (1996) and most recently co-authored a book with Laura Stivers and Jim Martin-Schramm: Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach, available through Orbis Press.  Dan has been teaching at Holden since 1986.

Sessions
Earth Ethics: A Case Study Approach to Current Environmental Issues
Introduction to Earth Ethics: A Spectrum of Possibilities
“Earth Ethics” integrates the fields of environmental and social justice ethics to help us reflect on how to respond to the range of environmental and social justice issues that confront us today.  This first session will introduce the concept of “Earth Ethics” and get participants to reflect on several central questions that help us to shape our ethics.

Placing Ourselves in the Debates
With some initial framing of ethical issues around some “big questions” introduced in Session I, we can now begin to place ourselves within a range of contemporary environmental and social justice issues.  We’ll look at six contemporary attitudes toward nature and the human place in nature to orient ourselves to why people respond differently to the same set of facts about nature.

Case One: Maybe One: Population Growth, Material Consumption, and Climate Change
Our first case study in “Earth Ethics” focuses on a young couple contemplating starting a family, and wrestling with how many children they should have.  Asking this question in our broader social and environmental context raises a complex interplay between dynamics of global population growth, levers of material consumption in affluent nations, and cascading effects on climate change.

Moral Eating: Issues around Meat, Factory Farming, and Local Food Production
Our second case study in “Earth Ethics” looks at the impacts on society, the environment, and the Earth itself of the choices we make in what and how we eat.  Focusing initially on the question of whether we should raise and eat animals for food production, the case expands to consider several additional intersection issues of environmental and social justice.

Klamath Crisis: Water Rights and Endangered Species Protection
Our final case study in “Earth Ethics” looks at an issue of growing importance in the American West: conflicts around water

Thompson_John_TF2020-web.jpgJohn Thompson   

John Thompson has a fine arts degree from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He started carving in 1990, making a carousel in Missoula Montana. He is now a printmaker that spends most of his time carving wood and some stone carving. He has been teaching printmaking workshops since 1980, and carving workshops since the early 2000s.  You can see some of his work at www.hobbyhorsearts.com.

Sessions
Beginning Relief Carving
Sessions will focus on safety, learning a bit about the wood, designing what the participants wanted to carve, fine tuning designs, carving tips, how to sharpen tools and the types of tools one might want to buy, and how to finish a carving-sanding.

Austen_Elizabeth_TF2020-web.jpgElizabeth Austen

AElizabeth Austen is a poet, performer, teacher and poetry advocate. She served as the Washington State Poet Laureate for 2014-16. Elizabeth believes poetry is part of our human birthright. Among the many things poetry can do, she’s most invested in its capacity to confront big questions with intelligence and feeling. Through its intimacy, slowness and layered silences, poetry can offer moments of stillness in a frantic, clamorous world. Her own poems explore the nature of physical and emotional courage, question societal norms for women, and consider the possibilities and limitations of healing in beauty and silence. She’s the author of Every Dress a Decision (Blue Begonia Press), which was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award, and two chapbooks. Her poems have been featured in anthologies and journals such as New England Review, Willow Springs and Poetry Northwest. She works with organizations including Seattle Children’s Hospital, Neighborcare, Virginia Mason and Kaiser Permanente, using poetry to help clinicians renew their connection to the heart of care. Elizabeth earned an MFA at Antioch University Los Angeles, and produced poetry programming for NPR-affiliate KUOW 94.9 for nearly 20 years. She is currently working on a new poetry manuscript.

Sessions
Read, Write, Release
Writing can be a meditative practice to release stress, create space for healing, and foster a sense of wholeness. We'll combine guided journaling with reading accessible, contemporary poems to begin - or deepen - a journaling practice. No previous journaling experience required. All materials provided.

Gestures of Repair: Writing the Praise Poem
Choosing to praise or celebrate what is otherwise treated as "broken" or "undeserving" can alter how we engage with the world. This workshop includes close reading of example poems and drafting our own praise poem.

Hike and Write
We'll gather for a short, meditative hike followed by a guided writing session in response to our walk. No previous experience with hiking or writing needed.

Westerlund_David_TF2020-web.jpgDavid Westerlund

David approaches life and the world with a growing curiosity, wonder, and a posture of "Yes". He savors Ignatian spirituality and longs to enter the Story more each day, sensing the deep, present, joyful Love of Jesus, who calls us Beloved. David lives in Bellingham, Washington and is the founder of Be Present Discover Joy Consulting. He facilitates applied improv workshops for non-profits, businesses, schools, churches, and for people who have experienced trauma. His workshops are designed for participants to cultivate presence and agility, discover joy and connectedness, and build resilience. He believes "that what we practice at a small scale can reverberate to the largest scale. (Adrienne Maree Brown)". His clients include The US Department of Agriculture, NonGMO Project, Bastyr University, United Way of King County Development Team, Lighthouse Mission, Campfire Seattle and he is a proud member of the Applied Improv global network and the Association of Fundraising Professionals. David was formerly the Director of Development and jail chaplain at Tierra Nueva a non-profit ministry that comes alongside incarcerated and immigrant people in the Skagit Valley of Washington State. He absolutely delights in being a father to his seventeen-year-old daughter. And he has discovered that when they are present with each other, they discover joy, and this builds resilience in their cherished relationship, giving them courage for living their lives. For more info: www.BePresentDiscoverJoy.com

Sessions
Applied Improv Re-forms us into Present People
We live in times of increasing uncertainty, isolation, and fear. Gabor Mate says the question is not, "What are we going to do about it?" But rather, "Who are we going to be in the face of it?" How do we re-form ourselves (as individuals and communities) to be resilient people in the face of uncertainty? Applied improvisation teaches us to be present, tune into each other, and support one another. And within the context of play and the vulnerability-support matrix, joy naturally emerges! And because it's embodied learning it more easily globalizes into our whole selves and communities; it re-forms our way of being in the world. These sessions will focus on being present, discovering joy, and building resilience all within an interactive context of foundational improvisation games. Absolutely no theatre experience necessary.

Applied Improv Re-forms us into People Who Build Resilience
We live in times of increasing uncertainty, isolation, and fear. Gabor Mate says the question is not, "What are we going to do about it?" But rather, "Who are we going to be in the face of it?" How do we re-form ourselves (as individuals and communities) to be resilient people in the face of uncertainty? Applied improvisation teaches us to be present, tune into each other, and support one another. And within the context of play and the vulnerability-support matrix, joy naturally emerges! And because it's embodied learning it more easily globalizes into our whole selves and communities; it re-forms our way of being in the world. These sessions will focus on being present, discovering joy, and building resilience all within an interactive context of foundational improvisation games. Absolutely no theatre experience necessary.

Guest Village Musicians – Steve Wolbrecht & Ron Pangborn

Wolbreacht_Steve_TF2020-web.jpgSteve Wolbrecht

While Steve Wolbrecht's day job is as a database administrator for the software company Smartsheet, his vocation is in music.  He is the lead composer for Zombie Orpheus Entertainment - a company he helped start - and has scored a dozen feature and short films to date.  He routinely serves as a substitute accompanist for Lutheran churches in the Tacoma, WA area, and has been serving as village musician at every opportunity since wintering at Holden from 1999-2000.  He is absolutely THRILLED to be officially teaming up with Ron Pangborn this summer.  Soli Deo Gloria!

Pangborn_Ron_TF2020-web.jpgRon Pangborn

Ron Pangborn has been an active member of the Detroit musical community since the mid 1970"s.  As a drummer, he has toured and recorded extensively with internationally known artists in multiple genres.  Ron is the music director of Hope Community Church in Detroit and produces podcasts and web content for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit.

Along with his wife Pam and daughter Jules, the Pangborns have been coming to Holden for over 20 years as both guests and staff.  Let the joyful noise continue!

Fernandez-Jennifer_TF2020-web.jpgJennifer Fernandez

Jennifer Fernandez, PhD is a constructive theologian whose teaching and research focuses on the intersection of critical social theory and liberative Christian theology. Her ministry focuses on shaping future leaders of the church within the classroom as well as helping to provide theological insights outside the classroom. In her work as a public religious leader bridges her interdisciplinary work with pressing social issues, particularly as they concern women's rights. Her dissertation, "Theology of Bread and Roses: A Feminist Relational Theology Embracing Women's Social Movements as Divine In-Breaking," proposes that women's socio-political uprisings are manifestations of divine incarnation. Jennifer argues in her work that feminist uprisings are God at work in the world relying on women's prophetic voices to point humanity toward right relationality. Jennifer teaches at The Seattle School of Theology & Psychology, is a Hispanic Theological Initiative Dissertation Fellow, a two-time Newhall Fellow at The Graduate Theological Union, and received her Master of Divinity from Pacific School of Religion. A recent transplant to Seattle by way of the San Francisco Bay Area, Jennifer lives with her husband and dog inthe North Seattle area. She enjoys ceramics, movies, and camping.

Sessions
Feminist Relational Theology – Women's Rights & Christian Thought
Through three sequential sessions, participants will learn about feminist Christian theology and its import to the current state of women's rights today. Participants will discover what feminist theology is and isn't, what it means to live into a feminist relational theology, and what role the church can play today in addressing issues of women's rights.

Hernes_Peter_TF2020-web.jpgPeter Hernes

Peter Hernes is a professor at the University of California in Davis, CA, specializing in river biogeochemistry, but increasingly interested in the social causes and impacts of environmental problems. He teaches a range of courses, ranging from aqueous geochemistry to water quality geared toward non-science majors to graduate writing courses to first-year seminars on environmental poetry and classic environmental literature. As an avid hiker, his interest in the environment is not just professional, but personal. Prior to landing in Davis, Dr. Hernes completed his bachelor's degree at Luther College, his master's and PhD at the University of Washington in Seattle, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of South Carolina. He and his wife have three children, three dogs, three cats, and more Holden pictures and memories than you can shake a stick at.

Sessions
The Happiness Machine
Our world is dominated by power structures, and the nature of these structures dictate our personal lives, our conflicts, our values, and not surprisingly, our impact on the environment. "The Fable of the Happiness Machine" is a parable that lays bare the collateral damage of power, and we will explore several different interpretations of the parable.

Intersections of climate change and racism
Climate change and racism are typically viewed as two separate problems with two separate solutions. However, they are fundamentally linked, and it is impossible to solve the former without also tackling the latter.

Disposable kids, disposable families
How a child with special needs and behavioral problems can fall through the cracks and (nearly) take their family down with them: the intersection of a family on the upper side of the economic and racial power structure with a daughter on the bottom of a societal power structure (developmental disability) and school and insurance power structures determined not to fulfill their legal responsibilities.

Doering_Deborah_Glenn_TF2020-web.jpgDeborah & Glenn Doering

Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts.  Deborah and Glenn emphasize both experiences and artifacts as they work with communities and individuals, drawing upon Coreforms and cultural Keywords as invitations to interact. Coreforms for DOEprojekts are the zero (circle), one (vertical line), hyphen (horizontal line), tilde (swash) and period (point). These forms are connected through movement. More about Coreforms and Keywords can be seen at: http://doeprojekts.org/coreforms-and-keywords-thoughts-on-invitations-to-interact/

Deborah received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When not working in collaboration, her individual works focus on the relationship of the keywords Nature and Technology, and can be seen at www.DeborahDoering.com. Glenn received his MS in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago. His individual works explore the keywords Biology, Body, and Fashion. He creates unique wearable objects that can be seen at https://www.instagram.com/parlaarte/

July 5–11, 2020

Jacobson_Diane_TF2020-web.jpgDiane Jacobson    

Diane Jacobson is professor emerita of Old Testament at Luther Seminary in Saint Paul, MN where she taught from1982-2010.  She also served as director of the Book of Faith Initiative for the ELCA from 2008-2016.  She is a rostered deacon of the ELCA.  Jacobson has been a frequent speaker throughout the Church, including churchwide assemblies, the LWF Assembly in Hong Kong, and numerous other national, synodical, and congregational gatherings. 

Jacobson’s main academic areas of teaching have been in Wisdom, Women, and Psalms.  She was a principle translator of the psalms for the ELW.  Jacobson’s recent publications include articles on Biblical Imagination, the Book of Ruth, Job, Biblical Poetry (Word and World 2011, 2013, 2014, 2019. See also her Book of Faith Lenten Devotional, Water Marks, and study on Ruth (co-authored with David Vasquez).

Jacobson currently serves on the boards of Augsburg College and Minnesota Opera and is very active with Eco-Justice groups in Minnesota.  Jacobson is, first and foremost, a lover of Scripture. "I'm in love with this Book," she says. "My calling is to teach Scripture for the sake of God’s world, and to invite others into the wonders and rewards of exploring the Bible together."

Sessions
Visions of Re-formation in the Psalms
Holden’s theme for this year is Re-Formation. The Book of Psalms resonates with this theme in astounding and often unexpected ways.  During our Living Word time we will explore together how the poetry of the Psalms invite us to re-form ourselves through lament and praise as we look to our relationships with God, with the earth and all creatures, and with all people – friend and foe, neighbor and stranger.

Jordan_Glenn_TF2020-web.jpgGlenn Jordan

Glenn is a public theologian working with Corrymeela, the oldest peace and reconciliation organization in Northern Ireland. Corrymeela's public theology work exists to motivate and support faith groups to widen circles of relationship, trust and witness. The work is focused on developing faith-informed practices of reconciliation, inclusion and peace-building, supporting churches and faith communities to respond creatively and effectively to difference. Glenn also has a keen interest in the theology and process of community transformation and renewal and was the creative spark behind the innovative Skainos Square in Belfast, an award winning community regeneration project in the Inner East of the city. He is a Tedx speaker and a writer on evangelical identity in Ireland, and on urban theology and is particularly interested in the power of story to create newness. He blogs on the crookedshore.com, named after the place where he lives and walks with his wife and two dogs.

Myers_Ched_TF2020_web.jpgChed Myers

Ched Myers, a fifth generation Californian, is an activist theologian who has worked in social change movements for more than 40 years. With a degree in New Testament from the Graduate Theological Union, he is a popular educator who animates scripture and builds literacy and engagement in historic and current movements for peace and justice. He has traveled widely around North America and abroad speaking to social movement groups and faith-rooted organizations and churches. His books include:
• Binding the Strong Man: A Political Reading of Mark’s Story of Jesus (Orbis, 1988/2008);
• Who Will Roll Away the Stone? Discipleship Queries for First World Christians (Orbis, 1994);
• The Biblical Vision of Sabbath Economics (Tell the Word, 2001);
• Ambassadors of Reconciliation: A N.T. Theology and Diverse Christian Practices of Restorative Justice and Peacemaking (with Elaine Enns, Orbis, 2009);
• Our God is Undocumented: Biblical Faith and Immigrant Justice (with Matthew Colwell, Orbis, 2012); and most recently
• Watershed Discipleship: Reinhabiting Bioregional Faith and Practice (Cascade, 2016).
More than 100 of his publications can be found at www.ChedMyers.org. Ched is a co-founder of the Center and Library for the Bible and Social Justice (http://clbsj.org/) and other collaborative projects.

He and his partner Elaine Enns, a restorative justice practitioner, live in the Ventura River watershed in southern California, where they co-direct Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries (www.bcm-net.org).

Sessions
Reckoning with Climate Crisis: Three Approaches
"Reckoning Climate Crisis: Biblical, Socio-political and Anthropological Approaches." This trilogy of sessions (which can be taken together or individually) will look at climate crisis from three different but related angles, straddling theological and sociological analyses and proposing personal and political strategies of resistance and resilience.  
     I.   Nature vs. Empire: Reading Climate Catastrophe through the Exodus Plagues
     II.  First and Worst: The “Plantationocene” and Environmental Racism
     III.  Addressing Alienation and Dis-Affection in Capitalist Culture:  Watershed Discipleship and an Ecclesiology of Re-place-ment.

Enns_Elaine_TF2020-web.jpgElaine Enns

Elaine has been working in the field of restorative justice since 1989.  For the first 15 years of her career she focused on victim-offender dialogue work in the Criminal Justice System. For the past decade Elaine has looked at how restorative justice applies to historical violations, including issues of intergenerational trauma and healing.  In 2015 she completed a Doctor of Ministry; her thesis was “Facing History with Courage: Toward a Restorative Solidarity.” This work has been expanded in a forthcoming book: Healing Haunted Histories: Decolonizing our Landlines, Bloodlines, Songlines (Wipf & Stock, 2020).  It explores the inward and outward journeys required of European Settler descendants trying to reckon with “haunted” histories and landscapes, to better equip us to practice restorative solidarity with Indigenous and other marginalized peoples in our home places. Elaine is Mennonite and works ecumenically, teaching and leading workshops throughout North America.  Born and raised in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, she lives in Oak View, CA, where she is co-directs Bartimaeus Cooperative Ministries (www.bcm-net.org).  She co-authored the two-volume Ambassadors of Reconciliation: A New Testament Theology and Diverse Christian Practices of Restorative Justice and Peacemaking with her partner, activist theologian Ched Myers (Orbis Books, 2009), and has published over a dozen articles. 

Sessions
Healing Haunted Histories: Decolonizing our Landlines, Bloodlines, Songlines
Central to the vocation of gospel-rooted restorative justice is identity formation that writer-activist Audre Lorde called “doing our own work.”  This entails naming, engaging and healing our personal and political complicity with race, class and gender disparities and inequities.  This workshop explores how Christians of European ancestry can become more responsible Settlers, seeking to heal the wide and deep legacy of colonization and violence on this continent through covenants of solidarity with Indigenous communities.  Sessions will explore “landlines” (where our people are from and where we immigrated to), “bloodlines” (family and communal narratives, including trauma and privilege) and “songlines” (stories of faith, conscience and courage that sustained our people and continue to inspire us toward justice).

Noltner_John_TF2020-web.jpgJohn Noltner

A Peace of My Mind is a multimedia arts project, created by award winning photographer John Noltner, that uses portraits and personal stories to bridge divides and encourage dialogue around important issues. Through exhibits, workshops, lectures and on-site studios, A Peace of My Mind leads transformative experiences that help a polarized world rediscover the common humanity that connects us.

A gifted storyteller, Noltner has worked on four continents, gathering stories of human courage, grace, and resilience. He has produced projects for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. A Peace of My Mind reflects his belief that art and storytelling can help individuals, organizations and communities articulate their deepest values and encourage action toward building social capital and community connections.

Sessions:
The power of stories
Join photographer John Noltner as he describes his process of storytelling and how stories can be used to articulate mission, vision and values, and how stories hold the potential to bridge divides. See examples of his work and use these stories to build conversations around some of the challenging social issues of our day. Race, faith, class, gender. During this session, we will also workshop your own response to the question we will be asking in the village this week for a new studio series: "Where do you find hope?"

Fear not
In the midst of uncertain times, our faith encourages us to "fear not." Powerful words that can be difficult to remember in the midst of trials. We do well to recognize when we have succeeded and hold up these small victories as a reminder and a model for how to move forward. Reflect on the stories gathered at Holden Village around the question, "When have you found unexpected courage?" and build a rich conversation around ideas of fear, courage and faith in a polarized world.

Privilege
Privilege can manifest itself in many ways. Race, gender, class, education, and age, among others. If our faith calls us to seek justice and compassion and give voice to the voiceless, we must first understand our place in the world. Last summer we asked Holden residents to respond to the question, "When have you recognized your own privilege?" In this session we will review the responses from that studio series, and use it as a springboard for our own conversations on privilege.

CP_TF2020_web.jpgChuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman

As Executive Directors of Holden Village, we have lived our life at the boundary of wildness and community. Our time here has fine-tuned some perceptions that have always resonated within our bones. Whatever power gave rise to the stars, to the earth, to life, permeates and nourishes all things.

Our art and work are the result of collaboration. Our art goes beyond the conceptual sense, to include working together on the same canvas.

We paint at the same time, forging ideas together that of us could create alone. We experience this as both visual and verbal communication. We begin our conversation in paint, letting each of our voices to be heard, allowing expression of our unique perspectives. Chaos seems to be necessary to get to the deeper order that unifies our work. Because we know that ideas usually don’t move in a straight line, we make intentional space for a more organic and flowing nature to take hold. Sometimes it takes courage, faith and a time to allow ourselves to be transformed by the process. We have found that our usual rushed and me focused behavior finally gives way to the quiet gift of being together. We bring this process into our talks and workshops where we create paintings in large groups, much the same way we create our own work.

In life and in conversation, things can get messy. The visual language of color and shape helps us think about larger issues together. Perhaps it is because most of this conversation takes place on the visual right side of our brains, rather than the verbal side. When we look at our result, we see evidence of our individuality, as well as the presence of a third dimension–more than the sum of our two parts. We are always surprised by what we have painted together and what we find in common. It is what we call Painting as Prayer.

Sessions:
A R T. E A R T H. S P I R I T
Using language of shape, form, and color we will reach into the landscape of the earth and deeper, into our silence, to touch where Spirit takes form. The artist’s role is to listen and respond not only to our own inner voice but also the presence of the unseen. The art becomes dialogue between artist, materials, the divine and eventually the viewer. This workshop is for all levels of artistic ability.

Rasmussen_Larry_TF2020-web.jpgLarry Rasmussen

Larry L. Rasmussen is Reinhold Niebuhr Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics, Union Theological Seminary, New York City.  His book, Earth-Honoring Faith: Religious Ethics in a New Key, received the Nautilus Book Awards as the Gold Prize winner for Ecology/Environment and as the Grand Prize winner for best 2014 book overall. He has been the organizer of the decade project on Earth-Honoring Faith at Ghost Ranch. An earlier volume, Earth Community, Earth Ethics, won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in Religion of 1997. He served as a member of the Science, Ethics, and Religion Advisory Committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was a recipient of a Henry Luce Fellowship in Theology, 1998-99, the Burnice Fjellman Award for Distinguished Christian Ministries in Higher Education, the Joseph Sittler Award for Outstanding Leadership in Theological Education, and the UNITAS (Distinguished Alumnus) Award from Union Theological Seminary, New York. From 1990-2000 he served as co-moderator of the World Council of Churches unit, Justice, Peace, Creation. He and Nyla live in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They are Santa Fe County Master Gardeners.

Lee_Asa-TF2020-web.jpgAsa Lee

Rev. Dr. Lee currently serves as Associate Dean for Campus Life and Director of African American Church Studies at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. He earned the Doctor of Ministry degree in Educational Leadership at Virginia Theological Seminary after having earned his Master of Divinity degree cum Laude from Wesley Theological Seminary. He completed his Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education, Magna cum Laude from Hampton University. Dr. Lee holds membership in several academic, professional and social organizations, including the Golden Key National Honors Society, Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, the American Academy of Religion, and is a Life Member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Incorporated. He teaches courses in the study of African American religious experience and practical theology with emphases in preaching, church leadership and spiritual formation.

Sessions
Howard Thurman: Christian Mystic
Howard Thurman is the 20th Century’s Christian mystic. His blending of African American religion, Christian identity, and natural revelation and mysticism served as the backbone of the Civil Rights Movement. This session is designed for a large or small group and is meant to create a basis for understanding Thurman’s theological, sociological and ecological lens for engaging the world.

Natural Revelation: Thurman’s Imaginative Ecology
Natural revelation in Protestant communities is often still viewed as highly unorthodox and inappropriate for divine revelation. Yet, Howard Thurman, Christian mystic and theological “father” of the Civil Rights Movement, relied heavily on his experiences of and in nature to experience the divine. Thurman’s experiences in nature would be creative and generative. Not just for his own faith, but were instrumental in the shaping of the theology that would motivate activists like Martin Luther King in the Civil Rights Movement. We will explore Thurmans’ theological and ecological imagination and how it fueled movements for social change.

Howard Thurman: Faith in Creation
This session will engage Howard Thurman’s exploration of faith and spirituality. Thurman’s faith was always a faith with outward implications. For Thurman, faith in creation means faith in the God of all creation. This session will look at how Thurman integrates theologies of liberation, spirituality, and social awareness.

Castillo_Daniel_TF2020-web.jpgDaniel Castillo & Kyle Lambelet

Daniel Castillo is Assistant Professor of Theology at Loyola University Maryland, where he also contributes the Environmental Studies and Peace & Justice Studies programs. He earned his PhD at the University of Notre Dame in 2014. While at Notre Dame, Dan's research was funded through the National Science Foundation, allowing him to explore aspects of the planetary eco-social emergency from a multidisciplinary perspective. Dan's teaching and research focuses on the intersection of liberation theology, environmental ethics, and the theological interpretation of scripture. He has published essays in these areas in journals such at Theological Studies, Political Theology, and Scriptura. Dan recently published his first book entitled An Ecological Theology of Liberation: Salvation and Political Ecology (Orbis Books), which explores the relationship between salvation, liberation, and care for creation.  He lives in Baltimore with his wife Erika and their two children Frances and Martin.

Lambelet_Kyle_TF2020-web.jpgDr. Kyle Lambelet teaches at Emory University's Candler School of Theology and researches at the intersection of political theology, religious ethics, and social change. His book ¡Presente! Nonviolent Politics and the Resurrection of the Dead (Georgetown 2020) develops an extended case study of the movement to close the School of the Americas. His current research focuses on the promise and limits of apocalyptic theology for engaging our planetary climate crisis. Before coming to Candler, Lambelet worked for several years in faith rooted organizing for racial and economic justice in the southeast United States. He lived for a season at the Open Door Community, a Catholic Worker community in Atlanta, and worked with the Greensboro Truth and Community Reconciliation project, the first citizen initiated truth and reconciliation process in the United States. Pursuing the questions formed during these experiences, he completed an MTS at Vanderbilt University Divinity School and a PhD in the joint degree program in Theology and Peace Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Lambelet is a committed lay leader in the Episcopal Church. He currently serves as the managing editor for the Political Theology Network. He also serves on the board of the Fellowship for Protestant Ethics.

Sessions
The Prophetic Imagination in the Anthropocene
Today, climate scientists argue that the world has moved into a new geological age, the Anthropocene–an era in which human beings have become the primary drivers of biophysical change on the planet. But the denotation "Anthropocene" begs a number of questions: What type of human being has driven the world into this epoch? Historically, how did we arrive at this moment? In what ways is the "age of the human," in fact, characterized by inhumane social structures and processes? In our sessions, we will explore these questions in light of the related histories of extractive colonialism and anti-black racism. At the same time, we will also consider how the Christian prophetic imagination can help to re-form the lives of communities of faith within the emerging context of the Anthropocene.

In God of the Oppressed, James Cone observes that the work of the theologian (and for that matter any person of faith) is twofold. First, the theologian must be an exegete of scripture, working to interpret God's ongoing revelation so that it might speak a prophetically transformative word into one's own historical context. Second, Cone argues that the theologian must also be an exegete of the world, working to give an account of one's own historical context in order to name the elements of that context that must be re-formed and healed in light of God's word. In these sessions, Dan and Kyle will follow Cone's principle in reflecting upon the challenges that persons and communities of faith must take up within the historical context of the Anthropocene.

Hermanson_John_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – John Hermanson

Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, television, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?” which is rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children: Ella, August, and Isak in St. Paul, MN.

Mastin_Jannele_TF2020-web2.jpgJannele Mastin

Jannele Mastin is an art director turned art educator. She is passionate about prompting students to use art as way to investigate and communicate social justice issues and their own identity in Christ. She is also fascinated with the role creativity plays in corporate worship and how these art-filled experiences shape the imagination and the spirit of individuals and communities. Jannele lives, works and worships in the Kansas City area with her husband and two daughters.

 


Carlisle_Kelly_TF2020-web2.jpgGuest Musicians – Geoff & Kelly Carlisle

Kelly Carlisle likes to compose, arrange, and lead music for the church. He is currently serving as Musician at St. Mark Lutheran Church in Salem, Oregon where he gets to do all of those things! He and his son Geoff are returning to Holden for their third time to serve together as Village Musicians.  Kelly just retired from K-12 Public Education, having taught high school choir for the first half of his career before becoming a school and district administrator. Kelly is now an Assistant Professor and Director of Administrative Licensure at George Fox University in Oregon. He has always been an avid cyclist and is now trying his hand at raised bed gardening. Kelly and his wife Nancy enjoy trying to keep up with their three grown children and daughter-in-law and would be delighted to show you pictures of their adorable grandson.

Carlisle_Geoff_TF2020-web2.jpgGeoff Carlisle was raised in Happy Valley, Oregon, and began playing viola at 11. According to his parents, he chose the instrument for its potential to earn him a college scholarship because "nobody wants to play it." He attended St. Olaf College, majoring in music and environmental studies. At St. Olaf, he enjoyed performing in 35 states, as well as Morocco and Spain. In his senior year, he was selected as the concerto competition winner for the St. Olaf Orchestra. He currently resides in Austin, Texas, where he teaches 8th grade science, is the assistant principal violist in the Austin Civic Orchestra, and enjoys training for triathlons.

Thorpe_Kate_TF2020-web.jpgKate Thorpe

Kate Thorpe is a doctoral candidate in English at Princeton University. Her dissertation seeks to reexamine the trope of personification in eighteenth-century poetry from Milton to Wordsworth. She is also currently completing a poetic manuscript, The Marriage of Art and Industry, about the transformation of post-industrial architecture through art in the Ruhrgebiet, Germany based on research conducted on a Fulbright Fellowship. Kate received an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and her poems have appeared in American Letters & Commentary, Court Green, Volt, and WSQ, among other literary journals. Kate teaches as a preceptor at Princeton and has taught literature and creative writing courses at the University of Iowa, Wesleyan University, the Technical University in Dortmund, Germany, and Mercer County Community College.

Sessions
The Poetry of Embodiment
In Western culture we famously have learned to split our bodies from our minds (but also spirits and emotions). Poetry has often been recruited as an elevated, philosophical art, sometimes even to the point of seeming aloof and inaccessible. But poetry awakens our senses through emphasizing, and reminding us, of the sounds and rhythms of language as a felt and experienced and not just intellectual or communicative medium. In this class we will practice engaging and awakening our bodies—in tune with our minds, hearts, and spirits, and with each other and with the earth—through writing and reading poetry, to create integration and wholeness as human beings within the embodied world of nature and human communities. Reading poems from the eighteenth to the twenty-first centuries, we will pay particular attention to how poems themselves are material forms, exploring new rhythms, sound connections and textures, and poets’ use of space on the page. Using these patterns and forms as models, we will experiment with the musical, rhythmic, voiced, and physical qualities of language in our own creative writing. Through writing and reading poetry together we will explore new ways to find integration and connections, challenging ourselves to become more fully and cohesively human in a world where it is easy to feel divided from other people, from the earth, and within (and from) ourselves.

Jacobson_Paul_TF2020-web.jpgPaul Jacobson

Paul Jacobson, baroque flutist, church musician, instrument maker, and composer, is co-founder of and flutist with The Lyra Baroque Orchestra and The WolfGang ensemble of Minnesota. He studied music, philosophy, and religion at St. Olaf College, at Union Theological Seminary School of Sacred Music in New York, at New College, University of Edinburgh, and at Columbia University School of the Arts. He has performed with many orchestras and ensembles throughout the United States and abroad and has served on the board of the National Flute Association, Early Music America (as vice-president), Lutheran Arts, and the Executive Council of the New York Metropolitan Synod of the LCA. Presently, Paul serves on the boards of Luther Seminary and the Lutheran Social Services of Minnesota Foundation. He is active nowadays as a baroque and classical flutist and as a composer of hymns, cantatas, and such.

Paul and his wife Diane (Professor Emerita of Old Testament at Luther Seminary and retired national director of the ELCA’s Book of Faith Initiative) live with their dog Zipporah (“Zippy”) in St. Paul and on a lake in the Superior National Forest. They have three sons and four grandsons.

Sessions
Hymns of Re-formation and the Creative Process
What is it about particular hymns that inspires you, that touches you deeply, that causes you to reflect? What hymns seem to be missing? What topics of faith need new hymns? Is humor or irony ever appropriate for hymns? How can new hymns address the challenges of our era?

We will look closely at a few of your favorite hymns to see what they say in word and music and how the text writers and composers say it. And we will set ourselves to writing hymn texts, and possibly even tunes and harmonizations. Perhaps we will share some new hymns with all of Holden Village in a casual hymn fest.

July 12–18, 2020

50–40–10 Week

Celebration of 50 years of Lutheran women being ordained in the United States, 40 years of women of color being ordained, and 10 years of LGBTQIA+ individuals being able to serve freely.

Richter_Kerlin_TF2020-web.jpgKerlin Richter

Kerlin Richter is a priest currently serving as the rector of Saint David of Wales Episcopal Church in Portland, OR. She is a visual artist and a poet, and she has been trying to learn how to dance and play the drums. She believes that faith itself is a creative practice and that making art and trying new things brings us closer to God even when or especially when our results are not what we had planned.

Sessions
Poets of the Word
Creative engagement with Scripture. People can bring their own journals and art supplies and I will lead the group of any size really in engaging with scripture in various ways. Each session will have its own verse.

Bolz_Weber_Nadia_TF2020-web.jpgNadia Bolz-Weber

Nadia Bolz-Weber is the author of two New York Times bestselling memoirs:
Pastrix; The Cranky, Beautiful Faith of a Sinner & Saint (2013) and Accidental Saints; Finding God in All the Wrong People (2015). She is an ordained Lutheran pastor (ELCA) and the founder of House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, Colorado a quirky congregation she served for over 10 years.  Nadia travels domestically and internationally as a speaker and has been featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, On Being with Krista Tippett, Fresh Air, CNN and in the Washington Post, Bitch magazine, More magazine and The Atlantic. International media coverage includes BBC World Service, The Guardian and magazine features in Germany, Poland, and Switzerland. Her upcoming book, SHAMELESS: A Sexual Reformation will be released in January, 2019.

Duncan_Lenny_TF2020_web.jpgLenny Duncan - Mission Developer Pastor at Messiah Lutheran Church in Vancouver, WA







Jordan_Glenn_TF2020-web.jpgGlenn Jordan

Glenn is a public theologian working with Corrymeela, the oldest peace and reconciliation organization in Northern Ireland. Corrymeela's public theology work exists to motivate and support faith groups to widen circles of relationship, trust and witness. The work is focused on developing faith-informed practices of reconciliation, inclusion and peace-building, supporting churches and faith communities to respond creatively and effectively to difference. Glenn also has a keen interest in the theology and process of community transformation and renewal and was the creative spark behind the innovative Skainos Square in Belfast, an award winning community regeneration project in the Inner East of the city. He is a Tedx speaker and a writer on evangelical identity in Ireland, and on urban theology and is particularly interested in the power of story to create newness. He blogs on the crookedshore.com, named after the place where he lives and walks with his wife and two dogs.

O_Tuama_Padraig_TF2020-web.jpgPádraig O’Tuama                                       

Poet and theologian, Pádraig Ó Tuama’s work centres around themes of language, power, conflict and religion. Working fluently on the page and in public, Pádraig is a compelling poet and skilled speaker, teacher and group worker. When BBC journalist William Crawley introduced Pádraig on the stage to deliver a TEDx talk on Story, Crawley said, "He's probably the best public speaker I know."
Ó Tuama’s published work incorporates poetry (Readings from the Book of Exile [longlisted for the Polari Prize 2013]; Sorry for your Troubles), prose (In The Shelter) and theology (Daily Prayer, The Place Between). Poems featured or forthcoming in the following publications or platforms: Poetry Ireland Review, Academy of American Poets, Post Road, Cream City Review, Holden Village Voice, Proximity Magazine, On Being, Gutter, America, and Seminary Ridge Review.  From 2014-2019 he was the leader of the Corrymeela Community, Ireland’s oldest peace and reconciliation community. A profoundly engaging public speaker, Ó Tuama has worked with groups to explore story, conflict, their relationship with religion and argument, and violence. Using poetry, group discussion and lectures, his work is marked both by lyricism and pragmatism, and includes a practice of evoking stories and participation from attendees at his always-popular lectures, retreats and events.

Sessions
Poetry of Prayer and Protest
Pádraig Ó Tuama is a poet and a theologian with an interest in language, conflict and belonging. These sessions will explore contemporary global poems that hold devotion, doubt, rage and justice together. No prior knowledge of the poems or poets is required, just an interest in how language and art can seek to make meaning in difficult times.

Noltner_John_TF2020-web.jpgJohn Noltner

Award-winning photographer, author and activist John Noltner has visited four continents, using photography and storytelling to bridge divides and build connections. After 20 years of photographing projects for national magazines and Fortune 500 companies, as John likes to say, "The economy handed me some free time."

Frustrated by the quality of our national dialog, John drove 40,000 miles across the United States, asking people the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?” In an increasingly  polarized world, he crossed the country in an effort to rediscover the common humanity that connects us. With portraits and personal stories, ordinary people reveal extraordinary insights into how we can work toward common good and create a world that is more just for all. Holocaust survivors, refugees, artists, death row inmates, teachers, immigrants, veterans, and more share inspiring stories of compassion, forgiveness, and transformation in a series that celebrates our common experience and sense of community.

In the past year, his work has brought him to Kenya, Peru, Thailand and dozens of venues across the United States in a continuing effort to highlight examples of how individuals can build relationships that transcend conflict, and elevate those as our model for how to move forward in the world. John’s work has appeared in National Geographic Traveler, Smithsonian and the New York Daily News. He has presented at the National Civil Rights Museum, the Gandhi-King Conference on Non-violence, the Sojourner’s Summit for Change and the Nobel Peace Prize Forum.

Norton_Laura_TF2020-web.jpgLaura Norton

Laura Norton is a calligrapher, art teacher, and activist propelled by her faith to seek justice and beauty. An award-winning calligrapher, she has taught at Wild Goose Festival, Grunewald Guild, and Holden Village, among other venues, enlivening and awakening joy and faith for participants. In her Lutheran congregations in Northwest Washington, Laura has created huge calligraphy-based murals on walls, taught calligraphy to all levels, and given presentations on justice-related issues such as anti-racism and women & justice. She created and led her congregation's Justice Seekers group, coordinating workshops, providing education and encouragement to pursue justice as a response to biblical principles. In addition to art, she is a theology enthusiast and has attended the Festival of Homiletics for three years as well as Institute of Liturgical Studies, connecting with pastors and laypeople from around the English-speaking world through her lectionary-based art. Laura's 30-year practice of calligraphy has included various media and surfaces including walls, silk, windows, paper, and calfskin vellum.

Sessions
Label Resistance: Tying Silk & Story
This is a participatory art experience and story sharing opportunity with the goal of addressing mistaken assumptions people make about us with our various identities, in order to create further understanding and empathy. Silk will be painted; simple, clarifying statements created; stories will be shared; and finally. a group art project will emerge which reminds us of our shared stories and shared humanity. Everyone's story is needed to create a beautiful whole!

This is a participatory art experience and story sharing opportunity with the goal of addressing mistaken assumptions people make about us with our various identities, in order to create further understanding and empathy. People who participate (artmaking storytellers!) will be invited to interact with, contemplate, paint, and finally write on a strip of silk, completing the sentence: “Even though I am… (tall/queer/pregnant/a homeschooler/a grandpa/Asian/a teenager/undocumented/over 60/Muslim/tattooed/a Republican, etc.), I also …,” filling in the second blank with their truth which helps to resist a frequent or hurtful misconception. The strips of silk can be written on with one’s own handwriting, expressing each individual’s uniqueness as a beloved member of humanity. Finally, all will work together as a group to create something new and beautiful, combining all the individual strips of painted silk--a sort of silk sculpture.

Kurtz_Rachel_TF2020.jpgGuest Village Musician – Rachel Kurtz

Rachelle Kurtz has been touring and singing for almost 20 years. She speaks frankly about love, God, parenting, heartbreak and her infectious laugh is peppered throughout her concerts. Her songs are rife with emotion and can make you get up and dance. Whether she is singing in a bar or church, her voice can cut through the noise and gives the listener a place to rest. She has sung at that last 6 national youth gatherings and her song "Make a Difference" is sung nationwide on any given Sunday. Come on out to hear her sing, you will be surprised and delighted.

Peters_Karen_TF2020-web.jpgKaren Peters

Karen Peters, M.Div. (Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York), is a Senior Rosen Method Movement Teacher Trainer and an Alexander Technique Teacher.  Having studied and taught Environmental and Feminist/Womanist Christian Ethics in her early adulthood, she realized that her interest in Earth and Embodiment Ethics needed to be grounded in her body and her work, not just read and written about. So she embarked on an experiential education (via the Alexander Technique and the Rosen Method) which deeply explored how we inhabit our bodies and how our interactions with ourselves, each other, and the world most often, detrimentally, come out what are largely unconscious, uninhabited bodies.  On the other hand, consciously exploring how we inhabit our bodies can be an endless source of self-discovery, wholeness, and connection.

Karen is Director of Rosen Method Movement at the Rosen Method Institute of Canada, and also teaches in Napa, at the Rosen Method Berkeley School in California, and in Mexico City.  She lives in Napa, CA, with her husband and two sons.

Sessions
Embodied Awareness, Embodied Movement, Embodied Life
These classes would be the equivalent of, say, a restorative yoga class or a t'ai chi class, in how they would function for the village.  In a Rosen Movement class, simple, range-of motion movements teach us where and how our bodies are designed to move.  The movements also help us
discover patterns of tension and habits of movement that have been causing us pain or limiting our potential, and give us the possibility and choice to move more freely.  In the process, we breathe more freely, find better balance, increase mobility, lubricate the joints, and just plain feel better.  And doing all this with embodied awareness deepens our connection to ourselves and our feeling of aliveness.  Rosen Method Movement classes are for people of all kinds of abilities, and are particularly treasured in older populations; physical therapy-based movements done with musical accompaniment are preventative as well as restorative, and facilitate each individual person's learning to move in their own particular body with freedom, presence, selfcompassion, and ease.                                                                                                                                                      

Buchanan_Brian_TF2020-web.jpgBrian Buchanan & Jo Archibald

Dr. Brian Buchanan is teaching courses in hydrology and water resource management at Humboldt State University.  His PhD was earned in the Natural Resources Department at Cornell University in 2013.  His professional research interests focus on sustainable water resource management, geospatial analyses, ecology, and stream restoration. In his spare time, he enjoys hiking, fly-fishing, sailing, bird watching, guitar and painting.

Dr. Jo Archibald teaches Environmental Resources Engineering at Humboldt State University. She earned Archibald_Jo_TF2020-web.jpgher PhD in Biological and Environmental Engineering from Cornell University, where she focused on watershed modeling and hydrology. Prior to graduate school, she served as US Peace Corps volunteer in a rural shepherding community in Morocco, working to increase access to clean water.

Her research focus is on creating tools to help optimize water-related decisions. While at Cornell, Jo developed a web-based watershed model to help farmers determine the high-pollutant risk areas to avoid spreading manure before runoff events. She also helped to develop the EcoHydRology package in R - an open source toolbox for ecological and hydrological data analysis. Most recently, she has been conducting research to optimize stream-barrier removal in New York State. 

On a personal note, Jo loves going on hikes in beautiful places, finding new ways to get around without a car, playing board games with friends, and being active in her local community. She lives with her partner Brian and their daughter Isla, who is teaching them to view the world with a whole new perspective.

Sessions
Stream connectivity
In this session, we will discuss why stream connectivity is important, how streams and rivers have become fragmented over time, and what is being done to mitigate this problem now that we are aware of the ecological impact that fragmentation has had.

Impacts of Climate Change on Water Resources
In this session, we'll discuss the primary drivers of climate change and what the implications are for water resources and the ecosystems that rely on clean and adequate water. We'll look at how a changing climate is altering the natural hydrologic cycle and how that is projected to affect the timing and distribution of water globally as well as within Washington State.

Assessing a River
This session will give participants hands-on experience in how to assess the health of a river or lake.  We'll look at common invertebrates found in healthy freshwater ecosystems and discuss what signs can indicate disturbance in a freshwater ecosystem. 

Hermanson_John_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – John Hermanson

Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, television, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?” which is rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children: Ella, August, and Isak in St. Paul, MN.

Yellowbird_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Leah Yellowbird

Intricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

July 19–25, 2020

Interfaith Dialogue Week


Campton_David_TF2020-web.jpgDavid Campton

An Irish Methodist Minister for 25 years and currently superintendent of Belfast Central Mission, a significant social welfare charity in Northern Ireland, David has consistently demonstrated a commitment to community development, political engagement and reconciliation. As a former actor and director, he is a regular radio broadcaster and one of the organizers of the 4 Corners Festival, a creative response to the historic divisions in Belfast. He is married to Sally, a community and volunteer coordinator for a housing charity, and they have two sons, Owain and Ciaran.

Sessions
Perplexing and Provocative Tales
For the past 30 years there has been a resurgence in the study of Jesus parables through the lens of narrative and literary theory, Liberation theology, cultural hermeneutics and other disciplines. This has freed our understanding of them from the anachronistic Christian allegorization that has prevailed for centuries on the one hand and the "one parable/one point" understanding that has dominated the 20th century on the other, suggesting that they are profound artistic creations; subversive short stories that are there to challenge prevailing thought and may well, as the gospels suggest, have gotten Jesus killed.

Most recently Any-Jill Levine in her "Short Stories by Jesus" explored some parables from her perspective as a 21st century Jewish woman and New Testament scholar. Using some of her readings, dramatised re-tellings and other perspectives, David Campton builds on his 2019 Holden Series "Preposterous Readings of Preposterous Stories" looking at the Book of Jonah, to explore what some of Jesus' perplexing parables have to say to us.

Session 1: How not to Read Parables: The Parable of the Sower and his Seed
Session 2: Growth is Good: The Parables of the Mustard Seed, Wheat and Tares etc
Session 3: In Praise of Corruption: The Parable of the Leaven
Session 4: First Century Socialism: The Parable of the Workers in the Vineyard
Session 5: A Deadly Story: The Parable of the Vineyard

Kyllo_Terry_TF2020-web.jpgTerry Kyllo

The Rev. Terry Kyllo is a Lutheran pastor serving as the director of Neighbors in Faith. He began this work part-time in September of 2016 and full-time in September of 2017. A graduate of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, he has been a pastor since 1991 and has served in partnership between Episcopalians and Lutherans since 2004. He is the author of two books, Being Human and Apprenticeship. Terry was the recipient of the Faith Action Network Interfaith Leadership Award in 2016, the Interfaith Leadership Award from the Muslim Association of Puget Sound in 2017, the Sultan and Saint Peace award in 2017, and the Muslim Association of Puget Sound 2018 “Inbound Good” award for a non-Muslim who benefitted the Muslim Community.

Kinberg_Yohanna_TF2020-web.jpgYohanna Kinberg

Yohanna Kinberg, a lifelong resident of the Pacific Northwest, and a second generation Rabbi. She has served the greater Seattle area as a Rabbi for 15 years. Rabbi Kinberg is a graduate of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College and currently serves a Reform congregation, Kol Ami, in Woodinville, WA. She is married to Rabbi Seth Goldstein and is mother to two boys, Ozi and Erez.

 

 

Pádraig O’Tuama                                  

O_Tuama_Padraig_TF2020-web.jpgPoet and theologian, Pádraig Ó Tuama’s work centres around themes of language, power, conflict and religion. Working fluently on the page and in public, Pádraig is a compelling poet and skilled speaker, teacher and group worker. When BBC journalist William Crawley introduced Pádraig on the stage to deliver a TEDx talk on Story, Crawley said, "He's probably the best public speaker I know." Ó Tuama’s published work incorporates poetry (Readings from the Book of Exile [longlisted for the Polari Prize 2013]; Sorry for your Troubles), prose (In The Shelter) and theology (Daily Prayer, The Place Between). Poems featured or forthcoming in the following publications or platforms: Poetry Ireland Review, Academy of American Poets, Post Road, Cream City Review, Holden Village Voice, Proximity Magazine, On Being, Gutter, America, and Seminary Ridge Review.  From 2014-2019 he was the leader of the Corrymeela Community, Ireland’s oldest peace and reconciliation community. A profoundly engaging public speaker, Ó Tuama has worked with groups to explore story, conflict, their relationship with religion and argument, and violence. Using poetry, group discussion and lectures, his work is marked both by lyricism and pragmatism, and includes a practice of evoking stories and participation from attendees at his always-popular lectures, retreats and events.

Sessions
Poetry of Prayer and Protest
Pádraig Ó Tuama is a poet and a theologian with an interest in language, conflict and belonging. These sessions will explore contemporary global poems that hold devotion, doubt, rage and justice together. No prior knowledge of the poems or poets is required, just an interest in how language and art can seek to make meaning in difficult times.

Hall_Christine_TF2020-web.jpgChristine Betz HALL

Christine Betz Hall is a Quaker, skilled educator, retreat facilitator, and spiritual companion. She directs and facilitates the ecumenical program, Way of the Spirit—an 18-month series of retreats and learning for growth in spiritual discernment, prayer, and Spirit-led ministry or activism from the wisdom of the Quaker tradition.  She has also served for eight years as adjunct faculty in Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry.

Chris has a contemplative spirit, called to nurture prayer and faithfulness that strengthen contemporary expressions of everyday ministry. Her teaching invites attentiveness to the Inward Teacher in ordinary life. Her gentle, experiential approach assists others to live more fully into giftedness, spiritual leadings, or larger ministry. Chris grew up in interior Alaskan, where mountains and wilderness fed her soul. She enjoys hiking, watercolor painting, and reading. She and her family volunteered a year in a Honduran home for orphaned and abandoned children with Nuestros Pequenos Hermanos (Our Little Brothers and Sisters), and has practiced war tax resistance in protest of excessive US military spending. Chris lives on Whidbey Island north of Seattle, Washington, USA, with her husband of 36 years.

Sessions
The Holy Between Us: A Spirituality of Relationship, Belonging, and Bridging
How do you recognize and honor the Presence of the Divine in relationships—between yourself and others, or in groups? Secular North American culture and many faith communities overemphasize a “me” or “me-and-God” lens on spirituality. Let’s try on a new way to see and understand the Holy in action through the “us” of life. This workshop from the wisdom of Quaker, community-centered, spirituality, invites you to explore and articulate your own experience of the Sacred in relationships.
Like a mini-retreat, brief presentations will combine with spiritual exercises and sharing to build collaborative learning sessions on these themes: 1) How We Experience the Holy Between Us,  2) Growing in Awareness of the Divine in Others, and 3) Bridges of Contemplative Prayer on Behalf of Others.  We will practice group processes that build respect and trust. As we encourage each other to speak authentically in our own faith languages, we grow in our capacity to listen “beneath the words” for the movements of the Holy in others with differing terminology. 

Vasile_Paul_TF2020-web.jpgPaul Vasile

Paul Vasile is a freelance church musician, consultant, and composer committed to building, renewing, and re-shaping faith communities through music and liturgy. Paul brings over twenty-five years of ministry experience to his work as a consultant, workshop facilitator, and teacher. He is excited to help congregations broaden their repertoire of sung prayer and praise, and to demonstrate how participatory music and liturgy can energize and unify worshipers from varied backgrounds, cultures, and traditions. His skills and background make him a unique resource to congregations in transition, or those experiencing anxiety or conflict in their worship life.

Sessions
This is My Story, This Is My Song: Song Writing as a Spiritual Practice
What music is bubbling up and out of the places we live, serve, work, and play? How does that intersect with the larger needs, challenges, and movements in the world around us? How do we listen, write and re-write, and welcome new songs that renew imagination, ignite hope, offer challenge, and shape us into a more just and loving community?

We'll explore the spiritual practice of song writing, noticing ways it invites us into loving listening, reflection, improvisation, and spiritual integration.
•    Explore songs from a variety of sources and traditions, attuning ourselves to the qualities of melody and text, and wondering what gives songs spiritual and expressive power;
•    Improvise together to support more intuitive decision making and confidence;
•    Invite written and spoken reflection on individuals' contexts, including the particular opportunities and challenges in our communities and places where new songs might be needed;
•    Invitation to write and share new material with the group in a safe, non-judgmental context
•    Dialogue around song-leading practices and modeling of ways new material might be shared
•    Theological reflection around music's role in community, how we learn and sing and why it matters so deeply

DeRose_Jason_TF2020-web.jpgJason DeRose

Jason DeRose is Western Bureau Chief and Senior Editor at NPR News. He edits stories from Colorado to Hawaii and oversees national coverage of religion, LGBTQ issues, and Native American issues. Before joining NPR, he was a senior editor and correspondent at WBEZ - Chicago Public Radio, where he covered religion and belief. He holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a bachelor’s degree from St. Olaf College. Jason spent many wonderful hours working at his college’s public radio station. Outside of work, he is an overly-active member at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, California, where he chairs the congregation's seminary internship committee. Jason loves reading sad novels but is really quite funny in person.

Kiggins_Justin_TF2020-web.jpgJustin Kiggins

After studying music and engineering in college, Justin started his research career interested in how our brains find music so special. This interest took him on a journey of over a decade seeking to understand how the brains of birds and mice make sense of the worlds around them... how patterns of light and sound become the meaningful signals in the brain that represents objects, concepts, and ideas. Justin received his PhD in Neurosciences at UC San Diego studying the auditory system of European starlings, then worked at the Allen Institute for Brain Science in Seattle, helping to build the Brain Observatory. During his career, he has developed a passion for making science open, equitable, and accessible. He currently works at a philanthropy in the San Francisco Bay Area, building open source software for computational biology and microscopy, helping to accelerate the science needed to improve human health for the next generation.

Sessions
The desert locust's journey
Though recorded since pharonic times, the most recent desert locust outbreak occurred started in 2003, devastating crops and causing billions of dollars in damages and problems in food security in West Africa. During swarms, they can travel a hunded miles in a day? What triggers these outbreaks and how do they migrate? Decades of research in the field and in the lab have brought light upon the migratory behaviors of these creatures, the way they use the sun to orient themselves, and how their brain processes this information.

The dung beetle's map
Everyone loves a good heist movie, right? Get in, get the goods, and get out. When there’s fresh feces lying around, dung beetles dive in, gathering the poo to feed to their young.  But after rolling up a ball of dung, how do they know which way to go to get out? A combination of field and laboratory studies has shown that they look to the stars to find their way.

The monarch's compass
As the only butterfly to make a round trip seasonal migration, the Monarch’s multigenerational migration is an incredible feat. But when the milkweed stops blooming, how do they know which way is south to make their return home? A combination of field and laboratory studies has shed light on how they use polarized light to keep a southward heading.

Busch_Zach_Bergman_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgGuest Village Musicians - Zach Busch & Leah Bergman

Zach Busch (he/him/his) is the Minister of Worship and Music at University Lutheran Church of Hope in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he has served since 2015. Zach is a graduate of Luther College (B.A. in music) and Luther Seminary (Master of Sacred Music). Zach takes special interest in exploring how the youngest generations interact with God and finding language for God beyond the boundaries of the established church. Passionate also about music's restorative and justice-making qualities, Zach works with the Voices of Hope women's choir at Shakopee Correctional Facility. He collaborates actively around the Twin Cities metro, has toured internationally as a member of the Together in Hope project, and music directs musical theater. Zach writes and arranges music and pursues a number of other artistic and spiritual endeavors that color his work as a church leader

Leah Bergman (she/her/hers) is the Minister of Worship and Arts at First Presbyterian Church in Iowa City, IA. She received a bachelor's degree in cello performance and music education from The Ohio State University where she studied with William Conable and Mark Rudoff. She attended Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN as a Master's of Music student under the mentorship of Paul Westermeyer. While living in the Twin Cities, she performed with various ensembles including singing with the National Lutheran Choir. Since being back in Iowa City she has enjoyed playing with the Iowa City Community String Orchestra, Iowa City Community Theater, and City Circle Acting Company, as well as playing and singing around town and at church as much as possible. When she is not involved in music and church work, Leah enjoys cooking, knitting, coloring, sewing, reading about Laura Ingalls Wilder, and hanging out at home with her puppy and husband.

Hermanson_John_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – John Hermanson

Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, television, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?” which is rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children: Ella, August, and Isak in St. Paul, MN.

Yellowbird_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Leah Yellowbird

Intricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

July 26 – August 1, 2020

Campton_David_TF2020-web.jpgLiving Word – David Campton

An Irish Methodist Minister for 25 years and currently superintendent of Belfast Central Mission, a significant social welfare charity in Northern Ireland, David has consistently demonstrated a commitment to community development, political engagement and reconciliation. As a former actor and director he is a regular radio broadcaster and one of the organisers of the 4 Corners Festival, a creative response to the historic divisions in Belfast. He is married to Sally, a community and volunteer coordinator for a housing charity, and they have two sons, Owain and Ciaran.

Sessions
Perplexing and Provocative Tales
For the past 30 years there has been a resurgence in the study of Jesus parables through the lens of narrative and literary theory, Liberation theology, cultural hermeneutics and other disciplines. This has freed our understanding of them from the anachronistic Christian allegorization that has prevailed for centuries on the one hand and the "one parable/one point" understanding that has dominated the 20th century on the other, suggesting that they are profound artistic creations; subversive short stories that are there to challenge prevailing thought and may well, as the gospels suggest, have gotten Jesus killed.

Most recently Any-Jill Levine in her "Short Stories by Jesus" explored some parables from her perspective as a 21st century Jewish woman and New Testament scholar. Using some of her readings, dramatised re-tellings and other perspectives, David Campton builds on his 2019 Holden Series "Preposterous Readings of Preposterous Stories" looking at the Book of Jonah, to explore what some of Jesus' perplexing parables have to say to us.

Session 1: How not to Read Parables: The Parable of the Sower and his Seed
Session 2: The Dysfunctional Family of God: The Parable of the Prodigal…
Session 3: Bad Neighbors: The Parable of the Good Samaritan
Session 4: Investing in the Future: The Parables of the Talents/Minas
Session 5: Party Tales: The Parables of the Banquet/Wedding Feast

Mason_Gary_TF2020_web.jpgGary Mason

Rev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organisation based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co-existence and shared space, it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianization efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognized by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster.

Gary also holds an honorary doctorate from Florida Southern College for his role in peace building in Ireland. Gary is a Senior Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is a Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peace building, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation. Gary is a faculty advisor to the Shades Harvard program on negotiation.

Kerssen-Griep_Jeff_TF2020_2-web.jpgJeff Kerssen-Griep

Jeff Kerssen-Griep is a Professor of Communication at the University of Portland, where he especially enjoys teaching Intercultural, Interpersonal, and Barrier-crossing communication courses. His research and workshops help teachers and other group leaders see and shape the skilled interactions that drive engaged, diverse learning/work environments. He also backs contra dance fiddlers on guitar in the PNW bands Joyride and Wild Hair. He lives in Vancouver, WA.

Sessions
Intercultural Communication
Communicator, Know Thyself
What’s Essential for Communicating with Unfamiliar Others? Learn, play, and practice with what’s known about how we all manage our cultural, social, and personal selves with others.

Navigating Unexpected Differences in Unfamiliar Spaces
Enjoy, investigate, and normalize how you and others navigate unexpected communication in novel cultural situations.

Build Your Intercultural Communication Skills
Explore and apply some key intercultural knowledge, attitudes, and skills that offer more comfortable and authentic connecting across national, ethnic, and other ingroup/outgroup boundaries.

DeRose_Jason_TF2020-web.jpgJason DeRose

Jason DeRose is Western Bureau Chief and Senior Editor at NPR News. He edits stories from Colorado to Hawaii and oversees national coverage of religion, LGBTQ issues, and Native American issues. Before joining NPR, he was a senior editor and correspondent at WBEZ - Chicago Public Radio, where he covered religion and belief. He holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a bachelor’s degree from St. Olaf College. Jason spent many wonderful hours working at his college’s public radio station. Outside of work, he is an overly-active member at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, California, where he chairs the congregation's seminary internship committee. Jason loves reading sad novels but is really quite funny in person.

Vasile_Paul_TF2020-web.jpgGuest Village Musician – Paul Vasile

Paul Vasile is a freelance church musician, consultant, and composer committed to building, renewing, and re-shaping faith communities through music and liturgy.  Paul brings over twenty-five years of ministry experience to his work as a consultant, workshop facilitator, and teacher. He is excited to help congregations broaden their repertoire of sung prayer and praise, and to demonstrate how participatory music and liturgy can energize and unify worshipers from varied backgrounds, cultures, and traditions. His skills and background make him a unique resource to congregations in transition, or those experiencing anxiety or conflict in their worship life.

Kegler_Emmy_TF2020-web.jpgEmmy Kegler

Emmy Kegler is the pastor of Grace Lutheran Church, a small servant-hearted neighborhood congregation in Northeast Minneapolis focused on feeding the hungry and community outreach. She is a co-leader of the Queer Grace Community, a group of LGBTQ+ Christians in the Twin Cities who meet for worship, Bible study, and fellowship. She is also the founder and editor of Queer Grace, an encyclopedia of online resources around LGBTQ life and faith. Her first book, One Coin Found: How God's Love Stretches to the Margins, tells her story as a queer Christian called to ordained ministry and how it formed her relationship with Scripture. As a pastor and writer, she is passionate about curating worship and theological practices that dismantle barriers to those historically marginalized by Christian practice. She lives in Saint Paul and enjoys biking, board games, books, and spending time with her wife Michelle and their two dogs and cat.

Sessions
Beyond Welcoming: Building an Invitational Community
Engaging and welcoming LGBTQ+ individuals as a congregation or other religious community often centers around a church making a public statement of affirmation for same-gender marriage, and, in some cases, for the recognition of transgender individuals' full identities. But for many LGBTQ+ people, this is a limited understanding of their spiritual and social/communal needs. How can we prepare and encourage our church communities to fully welcome, affirm, celebrate, and invite the belonging and participation of LGBTQ+ people at all levels of religious and spiritual practice?

Beyond Welcoming: Creating an Affirmational Worship
The concerns of LGBTQ+ people in church settings often raise important practical and theological questions about how we speak and act in sacred space. Does it matter how we speak of God and of the body of Christ, in prayer and in hymn and in Scripture? Does it matter who leads, and how? Does our understanding of sin and confession, law and gospel, word and sacrament change in the face of the experiences of LGBTQ+ people? How do these and other experiences inform and transform our ritual and proclamation?

Beyond Welcoming: Addressing Religious Trauma
For a significant portion of LGBTQ+ people, the Christian faith and its practices have been a source of condemnation and spiritual trauma. What does healthy community and relationship look like in churches that faithfully address these abuses? What do affirming allies (both rostered and lay) need to know about religious trauma? How can LGBTQ+ people recognize the symptoms and effects in their own spiritual lives? And together, how can we form religious communities that reduce or eliminate harm, and help encourage the healing process?

Carlson-Wee_Kai_TF2020-web.jpgKai Carlson-Wee    

Kai Carlson-Wee is the author of RAIL (BOA Editions, 2018). He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, AGNI, New England Review, The Southern Review, Gulf Coast, and The Missouri Review, which awarded him the 2013 Editor’s Prize. His photography has been featured in Narrative Magazine and his award-winning poetry film, Riding the Highline, has screened at film festivals across the country. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he lives in San Francisco and teaches poetry at Stanford University.

Sessions
The Journey Within
Leo Tolstoy wrote, “All great literature is one of two stories; a person goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town.” What did he mean by this? What constitutes a journey and what do our own experiences of travel and transformation offer our writing? What do they offer our communities? In this workshop we’ll be looking at the structures of travel narratives, spiritual quests, moral crossroads, inner and outer journeys, and asking ourselves how to develop evocative writing out of our own personal adventures. All writing abilities welcome!

Into the Wild
In this session we will talk about personal journeys and what causes us to seek out new frontiers. We will focus on the external world and how attention to detail in our writing can help our stories move inward. We will ask ourselves what wounds we carry with us and how travel can help us clarify a path toward healing and transformation.  
 
Encountering the Unknown
In this session we will talk about encounters with strangers, otherness, and the divine. We will think about how unfamiliar/uncomfortable situations can often open our hearts toward empathy. We will imagine our journeys from multiple perspectives and ask ourselves how these stories might be told from different points of view.
 
Transformation and Return
In this session we will talk about the importance of witness and returning to community. We will discuss how travel allows us to change and how our communities are enriched by the sharing of stories. We will reflect on the ways in which travel can deepen our faith in humanity and the collective human experience.

Durrett-Erin_TF2020-web.jpgErin Durrett

Singing in churches of many different denominations during her childhood lead Erin to become a psalmist and cantor in both the Catholic and Episcopal traditions with a fascination for vocal music in human history and pre-history. Currently Director of Music Ministries at Church of the Holy Spirit on Vashon Island she also composes and sings for the Puget Sound Zen Center and acts as song-holder for the people of Vashon and their indigenous neighbors. Active on many fronts she teaches near-shore ecology, advocates for the homeless, provides free music and art workshops for low-income children and has helped settle two families from Syria on Vashon in the last two years.  
Erin studied Early European Humanities at the University of Washington and the Early Music Institute at University of British Columbia, cantorial skills and psalmody at St. James Cathedral, Seattle and now teaches workshops on The Harmony of the Spheres, Gregorian Chant, Celtic Spirituality, Chants of the Divine Masculine/Feminine, and Chant as Spiritual Practice. She will be teaching The Music and Medicine of Hildegard Von Bingen on Vashon in 2019, and Hildegard and the Water of Life in Iona, Scotland in 2020 as part of an international conference on music and healing.

Sessions
Buddhist Chant - The Temple Bell
We will explore the great chants of the Mahayana Zen Buddhist tradition as technologies to expand awareness and raise spiritual energy using our hearts and ears to hear the still small voice in the silence and our bodies as temple bells.

The Harmony of the Spheres
How we can use sound to bring our human hearts and minds into unison with the mind of God.  We will explore the amazing medieval cosmology that underlies Gregorian plainchant and the basic physiology behind how and why we find its pure tones and simple, flowing melodies so mesmerizingly beautiful and healing to listen to.  We will sing simple sacred chants from our western Christian tradition and experience for ourselves the peace, serenity and closeness to God they create in us and understand why they still inform much of what we consider beautiful in music to this day.

Chanting with the Earth
As we became human we learned to sing from the birds, animals, wind and water and knew ourselves as one with all Divine Creation.  The Earth is constantly singing around us so we will go out and join the chorus, singing chants gifted to us by indigenous traditions from the four corners of the world we will bring the hills alive with music!

Marenco_Marc_TF2020-web.jpgMark Marenco & Todd Duncan

Professor Marenco graduated from Yale Divinity School in 1983 and then did his doctoral degree at Oxford University graduating in 1992. He taught philosophy at Pacific University from 1988 to 2018.  From 2000 to 2010 Dr. Marenco wa the director of the Pacific Institute for Ethics and Social Policy which received a $257,000 grant from the NIH to work with 21 religious communities in the Portland Metro area on the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of genetic science and technology. He also faciliated public educational interventions following 9/11 in collaboration with local law enforcement, the FBI, Microsoft, Intel, Mexican Consulate, regional politicians, and regional colleges/universities.  His most recent article, "Ethics Education in the Professons: an Unorthodox Approach" is published in the International Journal of Ethics Education (October 2018, Volume 3, Issue 2, pp 193 - 206).  He lives with his wife, Alejandra, a molecular biologist doing research on HIV for Oregon Health Sciences University.  He also lives with his son Paul, a student, musician and an enthusiastic Holdenite.  

Duncan_Todd_TF2020-web.jpgTodd Duncan has been teaching science concepts to a wide range of audiences (from grade school to graduate students to the general public) for more than twenty years. His emphasis is on glimpses of wonder that help us broaden our perspective and see beyond our limited points of view. Todd holds a Ph.D. in Astronomy and Astrophysics from the University of Chicago, an M.Phil. from Cambridge University, and a B.S. in Physics from the University of Illinois. With Craig Tyler, he coauthored an undergraduate astronomy textbook, Your Cosmic Context. He is currently on the Physics faculty at Pacific University, and was recently recognized as a 2019 Oregon Academy of Science Outstanding Educator in Higher Education.   

Sessions
On the Brink of Chaos: Can We Solve Our Potentially Fatal Problems?
It's easy to feel overwhelmed by the growing list of problems that could be fatal to our planet, or at least to the humans who inhabit it. On the surface, the problems are wide-ranging: climate change, runaway technology (genetic, nuclear, digital), immigration, abortion, race and gender issues... What do you do when what seems impossible is also absolutely necessary...?   Why are good people so profoundly divided on matters of religion and politics? How do our pictures of the world work both for us and against us? We'll explore these questions and offer up experimental approaches to some classic gordian knots, like abortion, race, immigration, etc. (you know the list...) Maybe we'll figure out some new ways to talk with each other and brighten things up a bit as we think about the future.

Hermanson_John_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – John Hermanson

Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, television, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?” which is rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children: Ella, August, and Isak in St. Paul, MN.

Yellowbird_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Leah Yellowbird

Intricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

August 2–8, 2020

Mark Brown -  Senior Advisor for Advocacy and Fundraising for Middle East/Jerusalem for LWF World Service   


Mason_Gary_TF2020_web.jpgGary Mason

Rev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organisation based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co-existence and shared space, it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianization efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognized by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster.

Gary also holds an honorary doctorate from Florida Southern College for his role in peace building in Ireland. Gary is a Senior Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is a Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peace building, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation. Gary is a faculty advisor to the Shades Harvard program on negotiation.

Kerssen-Griep_Jeff_TF2020_2-web.jpgJeff Kerssen-Griep

Jeff Kerssen-Griep is a Professor of Communication at the University of Portland, where he especially enjoys teaching Intercultural, Interpersonal, and Barrier-crossing communication courses. His research and workshops help teachers and other group leaders see and shape the skilled interactions that drive engaged, diverse learning/work environments. He also backs contra dance fiddlers on guitar in the PNW bands Joyride and Wild Hair. He lives in Vancouver, WA.

Sessions
Communicating Across Barriers
Understand Selves and Avoid T.U.I. in Connecting with Others
How to understand ‘self’ and ‘other’ as consequential realities we’re always negotiating. Learn to recognize and avoid T.U.I. ("Thinking Under the Influence") of unhelpful dominant assumptions that often mess with people's ability to interact and connect with “others.”

Are ‘isms’ Systemic, or Personal, or what?
Watch a film loaded with accessible first-hand stories and expert insights. Discussion afterward will unpack the nature of racism and other ‘isms’ and consider potential ways to mitigate and navigate their influences on our perceptions and interactions.

Sensible Responses to Entitled Tactics
Engage and experiment with ways to respond when people (including ourselves) deflect or deal oddly with encountering uncomfortable truths.

English-Dumont_Jennie_TF2020-web.jpgJennie English-Dumont

Rev. Jennie English-Dumont is a pastor in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. Ordained in 2001, she has served congregations in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and Chicago, IL. She earned a Master of Divinity degree (Luther Seminary, 2001) and a Master of Theology in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible (Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, 2015). In 2019 she served as auxiliary faculty at LSTC, co-teaching a class on Praying the Psalms.  
 
Jennie's congregation, Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Chicago, IL, has been recognized for its annual “Peace Camp” program, a one week program that aims to teach children to be active peacemakers. Similarly, the congregation's “Peace Team” seeks to use restorative practices (peace circles, civil dialogue, etc.), to foster healthy dialogue and effect social change.  When she is not serving the congregation or running after her seven year old daughter, Jennie is an active gardener, runner, Girl Scout leader (assistant!), and enthusiastic book club participant.

Sessions
From #Resist to #Reform: Moving from satire to social change in the Book of Daniel
Comedic satire can be a powerful tool of resistance against seemingly impossible challenges. This is why we often turn to The Daily Show or comedic memes to respond to the overwhelming problems of the world today. And yet the question remains whether jokes made in the echo-chambers of social media have the power to bring about true reformation and change. We will explore this question using the biblical book of Daniel, a book that shifts dramatically from comedic satire to terrifying apocalyptic in order to resist (and ultimately reform) the tyrannical rule of King Antiochus IV Epiphanes. What might these stories of fiery furnaces and talking beasts have to say to us today?

Eshleman_Andrew_TF2020-web.jpgAndrew Eshleman

Andrew Eshleman is a professor of philosophy at University of Portland (OR). In addition to his Ph.D. in philosophy, he has an M.A. in religion, reflecting his overlapping interests in these two fields. Both his teaching and published works have focused on topics in philosophy of religion, ethics, and on theories of freedom and moral responsibility. His edited anthology, Readings in Philosophy of Religion: East meets West, was one of the first to bring Asian schools of thought into conversation with their western counterparts. He practices both Christianity (in Episcopal fashion) and Buddhist (Zen) meditation.

Sessions
Religious Belief or Useful Fiction?--Remaking Ourselves in the Image of God
It is common in our culture to refer to a religious person as a “believer” and to thereby assume that what is central to being religious is belief in some claims about an ultimate divine reality. This session will critically examine this assumption and explore the promise of refocusing attention on a religion's role in constituting a community organized around a set of ideals and practices aimed at helping its members --both individually and collectively --to transform themselves in the direction of those ideals. This re-centering of attention allows for the possibility that being authentically religious need not require belief in any particular doctrine --that it's possible to rest content in regarding religious doctrines as useful fictions for remaking ourselves in the image of God (or the Dao, Brahman, etc.)

The Afterlife as a Guide to the Here and Now
Taking the notion of an afterlife seriously is often thought to hinge on the question of whether one can believe it is possible that one will survive one's bodily death. However, it's important not to overlook the way in which depictions of an afterlife can function to provide much needed perspective on the present life and moral guidance. For example, the Judeo-Christian image of the afterlife as the fully realized Kingdom of God portrays an ideal of restorative justice, and the Buddhist depiction of final nirvana suggests how one might be fully connected to lived reality without ego distortion. We'll use snippets from two films --“The Tree of Life” by Terence Malik and “Afterlife” by Hirokazu Kore-eda-- to illustrate how these ideals may be reflected in depictions of an afterlife.

Pursuing Inner Freedom: Escaping Plato’s Cave and then What?
Culturally, we prize our freedoms.  When thinking of personal or political freedom, we're inclined to think of it as an absence of obstacles to choosing one thing vs. another based on what we most want, or desire.  We might think less often about the type of inner freedom prized in many religious traditions --a freedom that is to be cultivated through the removal of illusions and problematic attachments, thereby allowing for the full development of our moral capacity to think, feel, and act rightly. We'll explore two examples of such inner freedom: one inspired by Plato and developed by the Stoics (which comes to influence Christianity) and one from ancient Chinese Daoism (which comes to influence Zen Buddhism).

Carlson-Wee_Kai_TF2020-web.jpgKai Carlson-Wee    

Kai Carlson-Wee is the author of RAIL (BOA Editions, 2018). He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, AGNI, New England Review, The Southern Review, Gulf Coast, and The Missouri Review, which awarded him the 2013 Editor’s Prize. His photography has been featured in Narrative Magazine and his award-winning poetry film, Riding the Highline, has screened at film festivals across the country. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he lives in San Francisco and teaches poetry at Stanford University.

Sessions
The Journey Within
Leo Tolstoy wrote, “All great literature is one of two stories; a person goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town.” What did he mean by this? What constitutes a journey and what do our own experiences of travel and transformation offer our writing? What do they offer our communities? In this workshop we’ll be looking at the structures of travel narratives, spiritual quests, moral crossroads, inner and outer journeys, and asking ourselves how to develop evocative writing out of our own personal adventures. All writing abilities welcome!

Into the Wild
In this session we will talk about personal journeys and what causes us to seek out new frontiers. We will focus on the external world and how attention to detail in our writing can help our stories move inward. We will ask ourselves what wounds we carry with us and how travel can help us clarify a path toward healing and transformation.  
 
Encountering the Unknown
In this session we will talk about encounters with strangers, otherness, and the divine. We will think about how unfamiliar/uncomfortable situations can often open our hearts toward empathy. We will imagine our journeys from multiple perspectives and ask ourselves how these stories might be told from different points of view.
 
Transformation and Return
In this session we will talk about the importance of witness and returning to community. We will discuss how travel allows us to change and how our communities are enriched by the sharing of stories. We will reflect on the ways in which travel can deepen our faith in humanity and the collective human experience.

Lowe_Mary_TF2020-web.jpgMary Lowe

Mary Elise Lowe is Associate Professor of Religion at Augsburg University in Minneapolis. Mary grew up in Anchorage, Alaska, and later attended Pacific Lutheran University. After completing a pastoral internship year in Swaziland, (now Eswatini) she received her M.Div. from Luther Seminary and her Ph.D. from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, CA. Her teaching and research focus on LGBTQI+ theologies, Martin Luther's theology, embodiment, and disability theologies.
Her most recent publications include, “The Queer Body-Mind in Martin Luther's Theology: From Subaltern Sodomite to Embodied Imago Dei”, and “From the Same Spirit: Receiving the Gifts of Transgender Christians”. Prof. Lowe also served on the writing team for the 2019 ELCA social statement, “Faith, Sexism, and Justice: A Call to Action”.

Sessions
LGBTQI+ Theologies: Bringing Gifts for All
My sessions could be offered as as stand alone, but sessions 2-4 will make more sense if people have attended session 1. In these sessions, participants will be introduced to three (or four) themes in LGBTQI+ theologies. To begin, we will explore how LGBTQI+ theologians are finding echoes of queerness in the Bible. In session two, we will be introduced to the way LGBTQI+ theologians focus on God's ongoing activity in creation, and how persons can be faithful (hesed) to themselves. In our third session we will discover how Jesus rejected traditional maleness and masculinity. In the fourth session we will listen to the stories of transgender and intersex Christians and discover how they affirm plurality in their lives and theologies.

Guest Village Musicians - Yasmine Ravard-Andresen and Neal Sharpe

Ravard-Andresen_Yasmine-TF2020-web.jpgYasmine Ravard-Andresen

Yasmin Ravard-Andresen is Music Minister and Board Gardener at Valley & Mountain Fellowship in Seattle, Washington.  Yasmin’s ancestors were born in North India and in West Africa. She was born and raised in Tongva territory (Los Angeles) and moved to Chinook territory (Portland, OR) in high school. She studied Theatre at University of Oregon (Kalapuya territory). Yasmin grew up with a solid diet of the performing arts, interfaith spirituality, and multiethnic community. She served as a campus minister and worship leader for eight years on college campuses throughout the Northwest and worked as a professional actor in Duwamish territory (Seattle) for a few years. She cherishes her role with Valley & Mountain and the opportunity to co-create a transcendent musical experience at the intersection of mystical faith and justice for all. She lives with her partner and children on Vashon Island. They attend an outdoor farm school and she is an instructor with Vashon Wilderness Program. Yasmin comes alive while singing, storytelling, and making something with her hands.

Sharpe_Neal_TF2020-web.jpgNeal Sharpe

Neal Sharpe loves unanswerable questions.  His Enneagram type 1 (the reformer) personality leads him to enjoy, like a toddler, building towers to only knock them down and rebuild them in a new way.  In a previous life, he spent his time being a classical vocalist - which mostly entails wearing uncomfortable tuxedos and standing on stages while pretending to be much more serious than he actually is. Neal currently spends his time renovating and repurposing a one-hundred year old building into a community center, called The Ravenna Collaboratory, that is home to The Seattle Residency Project, a coworking space, a coop preschool, and other community events.  Community is his true passion.  Neal is also a co-convener of Valley and Mountain, a subversive mystical community rooted in the Christian tradition. If you would like to know the schools Neal attended and/or grew up, he’d love to talk to you about it. However, he thinks it doesn’t tell you much about him in this bio. His greatest joys come from sharing good conversation over well crafted drinks, creative approaches to problem solving, and an embrace of sarcasm.  His greatest weakness is manifested in the combination of bread, cinnamon, sugar, and cream cheese… and answering emails. 


Brown_Verlon_TF2020-web.jpgVerlon Brown

Verlon Brown works the streets of Seattle with homeless addicted people, the very people his mother told him to avoid.  He also serves as pastor at Central Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill.  Before moving to Seattle, he worked with homeless people in Washington, D.C. and then served as Holden Village Pastor in the early 1990s. He also plays harmonica in a blue-grass band.

Sessions
Who becomes homeless and why?
An experiential game that explores the unexpected and traumatic life events that lead to homelessness.  I developed this experiential game over my 30 years of working with homeless people in Washington, D.C. and Seattle to teach both adults and youth what causes homelessness (poverty, addiction, sexual abuse, violence, mental illness, disability, childhood neglect, etc.), how difficult it is to move out of homelessness, and the choices that have to be made in order to survive on the streets.

Racism 2.0
An opportunity to go beyond a simple introduction to racism that most progressive whites
receive in a oneday workshop, a magazine article, a segment on a TV talk show, or a class back in college.  Participants will see just how much racism permeates our history and society.
Through selected videos and discussion, they will learn that being nice to black people and having a black friend is not nearly enough to combat racism.

How to disrupt America's racist system of oppression
Some concrete things that anyone can do to change the system of oppression that dominates our society. The purpose of this session is to give participants five tools that will help them confront racism. We will see racism as a systemic issue and not just an individual issue. Racism is not just
individual actions but is baked into our everyday lives. We will find our strengths and summon the courage to change our world and ourselves with practical solutions and discussion.

Hermanson_John_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – John Hermanson

Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, television, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?” which is rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children: Ella, August, and Isak in St. Paul, MN.

Yellowbird_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Leah Yellowbird

Intricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

August 9–15, 2020

Hughes-Carl-TF2020_web.jpgCarl Hughes

Dr. Carl S. Hughes teaches historical and constructive theology at Texas Lutheran University in Seguin, TX. His interests focus on the legacies and challenges of the Lutheran theological tradition and how they relate to struggles for justice in society today. He is currently working on a book on how Luther’s theology of the cross can inform biblical interpretation so that it promotes spiritual growth and social transformation, particularly in matters related to race. Hughes is the author of Kierkegaard and the Staging of Desire: Rhetoric and Performance in a Theology of Eros (Fordham University Press, 2014) and a contributor to Radical Lutherans/Lutheran Radicals, edited by Jason Mahn (Cascade, 2017).

Sessions
Deepening Faith through Interfaith Encounter
This class will explore how engagement with other faiths through study, practice, and personal relationships can deepen Christians’ own faith and spirituality. How might other traditions challenge Christians to become better versions of themselves? In what ways might Christians’ own stories and convictions motivate them to admire, experience, listen to, and learn from the faith of others?  We will begin each session by reading and discussing a story of inter-faith encounter in the Christian Bible. We will then consider a story, practice, or teaching from a tradition outside Christianity and reflect on how it might enrich, clarify, or reform Christian life today. Along the way, we will explore topics such as the possibility of multi-religious belonging, the enduring challenges posed by differences of belief, and the history and potential of inter-religious collaboration for social justice and the common good.

Mark Brown - Senior Advisor for Advocacy and Fundraising for Middle East/Jerusalem for LWF World Service  


Newcomer_Carrie_TF2020-web.jpgCarrie Newcomer

Carrie Newcomer is a performer, recording artist, and educator, described as a “prairie mystic” by the Boston Globe and one who “asks all the right questions” by Rolling Stone. Her song “I Should’ve Known Better” appeared on Nickel Creek’s Grammy award-winning gold-certified album “This Side”, and she earned a regional Emmy for the PBS special “An Evening with Carrie Newcomer.” Carrie is the 2019 recipient of the Shalem Institute Contemplative Voices Award. Recent media appearances include PBS’s Religion and Ethics and Krista Tippett’s On Being. In the fall of 2009 and 2011 Newcomer was a cultural ambassador to India, invited by the American Embassy of India, resulting in her interfaith collaborative benefit album Everything is Everywhere with world master of the Indian Sarod, Amjad Ali Khan and his sons Ayan and Amaan. In 2012 and 2013 Carrie traveled to Kenya and the Middle East performing in schools, spiritual communities and AIDS hospitals. Carrie has 17 nationally released albums on Available Light and Rounder Records, including The Point of Arrival, The Beautiful Not Yet, A Permeable Life, and Everything is Everywhere. Newcomer has also released two companion books of poetry and essays, A Permeable Life: Poems and Essays and The Beautiful Not Yet: Poems, Essays, & Lyrics. Newcomer’s first theatrical production, Betty’s Diner: The Musical, was performed at a sold out run at Purdue University in 2015 and is now available to interested theaters, universities, and spiritual communities.

In 2016 Carrie presented the Goshen College commencement address and was awarded an honorary degree in Music for Social Change. She regularly works with Parker J. Palmer in live programs, including Healing the Heart of Democracy: A Gathering of Spirits for the Common Good and What We Need is Here: Hope, Hard Times, and Human Possibility. Newcomer and Palmer also are actively collaborating on The Growing Edge, a website, podcast, and retreat. Spirituality and Health Magazine named The Growing Edge collaboration as one of the top ten spiritual leaders and programs for the next 20 years. Three of Newcomer’s songs are included in Palmer’s newest book. Other special collaborations include presentations with neuroscientist Jill Bolte Taylor, author Rabbi Sandy Sasso, and environmental author Scott Russell Sanders.  Carrie lives in the woods of southern Indiana with her husband and two shaggy dogs.

Sessons
The Beautiful Not Yet: Living with Hope in Hard Times
“Hope is holding in creative tension, everything that is, with all that could and should be, and and each day taking action to lessen the distance between the two.”  –Parker J. Palmer.

This mini-retreat led by singer songwriter, Carrie Newcomer, will explore maintaining hope and our ability to envision during times of individual and community challenge. Carrie will use music, poetry, reflective writing, small and large group conversation to explore the personal stories and practices (including contemplative practice) that keeps us resilient and helps us to stay centered in daily, faithful, and life-giving action.

Participants will consider the things that have helped them maintain hope in the past as well as ponder if those things are still available to us, and if so how do we access them. This mini retreat will be conducted in a safe and welcoming atmosphere. No previous experience with creative art forms is necessary.

Telling Our Story in Song: A Community Songwriting Experience
In this fast paced and engaging workshop Carrie will invite participants to explore a topic creatively through the use of song. She will lead the group through the process of choosing a topic, creating the language, moving the language into music form, and by the end of the workshop have a finished song the group can sing together. This workshop requires absolutely no musical experience. In an educational setting, this experience is a fun and exciting way to understand and embody new ideas and material. In a conference setting this experience is a wonderful way to creatively embody the stories, ideas and themes being discussed during the conference. This is a fast paced, guaranteed to make you smile experience, presented in a safe and welcoming atmosphere. Carrie will create a very simple MP3 version and a lyric/chord sheet of the song after the experience and send to group leader for distributing to participants.

CP_TF2020_web.jpgChuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman

As Executive Directors of Holden Village, we have lived our life at the boundary of wildness and community. Our time here has fine-tuned some perceptions that have always resonated within our bones. Whatever power gave rise to the stars, to the earth, to life, permeates and nourishes all things.

Our art and work are the result of collaboration. Our art goes beyond the conceptual sense, to include working together on the same canvas.

We paint at the same time, forging ideas together that of us could create alone. We experience this as both visual and verbal communication. We begin our conversation in paint, letting each of our voices to be heard, allowing expression of our unique perspectives. Chaos seems to be necessary to get to the deeper order that unifies our work. Because we know that ideas usually don’t move in a straight line, we make intentional space for a more organic and flowing nature to take hold. Sometimes it takes courage, faith and a time to allow ourselves to be transformed by the process. We have found that our usual rushed and me focused behavior finally gives way to the quiet gift of being together. We bring this process into our talks and workshops where we create paintings in large groups, much the same way we create our own work.

In life and in conversation, things can get messy. The visual language of color and shape helps us think about larger issues together. Perhaps it is because most of this conversation takes place on the visual right side of our brains, rather than the verbal side. When we look at our result, we see evidence of our individuality, as well as the presence of a third dimension–more than the sum of our two parts. We are always surprised by what we have painted together and what we find in common. It is what we call Painting as Prayer.

Sessions
A R T. E A R T H. S P I R I T
Using language of shape, form, and color we will reach into the landscape of the earth and deeper, into our silence, to touch where Spirit takes form. The artist’s role is to listen and respond not only to our own inner voice but also the presence of the unseen. The art becomes dialogue between artist, materials, the divine and eventually the viewer. This workshop is for all levels of artistic ability.

Halvorson_Suzanne_TF2020-web.jpgSuzanne Halvorson

Well known for her innovative double weave scarves and stoles, as well as for her hand-woven liturgical vestments and paraments.

 

 

Arnold_Trudy_TF2020-web.jpgTrudy Arnold - Accomplished fiber artist

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Halvorson_Jim_TF2020_web.jpgResident Artist Jim Halvorson - potter

 

 

 

 

 


Claitor_Diana_TF2020_web.jpgDiana Claitor

Diana Claitor has been a journalist and historical researcher for more than 30 years, writing for publications such as the Texas Observer as well as newspapers in Austin, Dallas and other cities. Claitor worked as an information specialist at PBS in Washington, D.C. In Austin, she has been a researcher at area archives and a researcher and editor at Wexford Publishing for decades.
In 2006, she co-founded the nonprofit Texas Jail Project (TJP) where she has been executive director for 14 years. She has answered hundreds of emails and calls and continually updates an innovative website — texasjailproject.org — that provides information to families and friends of the 65,000 inmates in Texas county jails on any given day. Under her guidance, TJP launched “Jailhouse Stories: Voices of Pretrial Detention in Texas,” a website of first-hand accounts about the devastating effects of incarceration prior to conviction. She supported four bills reforming treatment of pregnant women over and contributed to other legislation regarding care of those jailed while experiencing mental illness. Claitor speaks to media, participate in panels and contributes to publications like “Preventable Tragedies: How to Reduce Mental Health-Related Deaths in Texas Jails,” from the University of Texas Law School’s Civil Rights Clinic.

Sessions
Compassion During Crises
As questions and pleas for help came to the co-founder of  the Texas Jail Project, she discovered how listening is healing for both the speaker and the listener. How can we respond to people who need help?

Many of us shy away—it may be that we don’t feel qualified to help or we just don’t think we can bear to hear about traumatic life events without becoming upset or depressed. As director of the Texas Jail Project, I listen to and respond to people trying to find help for loved ones incarcerated in county jails. Their lives are often very complicated and the problems daunting. Since the beginning of our group 14 years ago, we have collected stories, learning along the way that listening can be not only positive for them but positive for us. Listening, we become educated as to our own personal gaps in understanding, tolerance and compassion. At the same time, people isolated by their painful dilemmas find hope when strangers validate their feelings and express a desire to help. Compassionate listening has the power to bring together disparate communities and to forge bonds.

Be a Navigator for Those at Sea
Those with connections and networks can support those lacking access to power by providing strategies for navigation of governmental and societal systems.

Many ethical people are not aware of the tremendous gaps in the US today because they have the advantage of support networks and resources that they take for granted. On the outskirts of our comfort zones are those who are impoverished and isolated, others with mental illness and disabilities—populations lacking contacts in the power structure and with little access to the Internet or other resources. There is a need is for navigators who can provide directions, tips, and information while encouraging communities to develop their own strategies to deal with bureaucracies, criminal justice and mental health systems. Community members can learn how to complain effectively, use stories, organize through social media and leverage their own vulnerability to gain allies. As a navigator, first use your networks to develop relationships throughout the state agencies and local governments— bureaucracies that influence all our lives. Then build relationships within communities—and often a single individual provides a pathway—enabling that   community to create and unify around a proactive effort. By shining a light on those efforts, advocates multiply the impact.

Note to Self: Stop Stereotyping
Stereotyping is rampant—whether it be via racism, ageism, or assumptions about gender, religion, disabilities or criminal justice involvement. These biases not only prevent equal opportunity and fair treatment, they don’t allow for the humanity of each individual. Moreover, stereotyping hinders our own ability to understand, grow and fully appreciate the world around us. Working at the Texas Jail Project, I have multiple conversations with people from myriad backgrounds, and one by one, those interactions have revealed preconceived notions built into my psyche. Listening to a woman who ran a Christian high school on the border forced me to put aside what I thought I knew about modern Christianity, a meth user’s transformation into a peer counselor taught me about the fallacy of hopelessness; a gentle African-American husband broke the stereotype of the macho male, and a younger generation has taught me about persistence and passion. Understanding the realities of people’s lives outside our own little bubble can be life-affirming and energizing.

Moe-Lobeda_Cynthia_TF2020-web.jpgCynthia Moe-Lobeda

Cynthia Moe-Lobeda has lectured or consulted in Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, Australia, and North America in theology; ethics; and matters of climate justice and climate racism, moral agency, globalization, economic justice, eco-feminist theology, and faith-based resistance to systemic oppression. Her most recent book, Resisting Structural Evil: Love as Ecological-Economic Vocation, won the Nautilus Award for social justice. She is author or co-author of six volumes and numerous articles and chapters. Moe-Lobeda is Professor of of Theological and Social Ethics at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, Church Divinity School of the Pacific, and the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. She holds a doctoral degree in Christian Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, affiliated with Columbia University. The website for her most recent book is: http://resistingstructuralevil.com/.  She loves hiking in the Cascade Mountains and is learning to relish also the lands of California. Her greatest joys are her husband, Ron; two wonderful sons and wonderful daughter-in-law; and two splendid grandchildren.

Boulter_James_TF2020-web.jpgJames Boulter

Dr. James Boulter is professor of chemistry in the Watershed Institute for Collaborative Environmental Studies, an interdisciplinary academic program focused on studies of environmental health and sustainability at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. His professional background is in atmospheric and analytical chemistry: his bachelor's degree is in chemistry and biochemistry with a certificate in environmental studies from Pacific Lutheran University and his doctorate is in analytical chemistry with a certificate in oceanic and atmospheric studies from the University of Colorado, Boulder.
 
At UW-Eau Claire, he has served as the chancellor's sustainability fellow, as the founding director of the Watershed Institute for Collaborative Environmental Studies, and as the faculty advisor to the Student Office of Sustainability. In the community, he has been a member of the City of Eau Claire's Advisory Committee on Sustainability and has contributed to leadership roles in the Eau Claire chapter of Citizens' Climate Lobby. Over the past two decades, he has given dozens of public presentations connected to the topic of climate change: planetary atmospheric science, global and regional climate science, perceptions of and responses to climate change, the intersection of religious faith and climate, renewable and carbon-free energy, climate policy solutions, and sustainability.

Sessions
Climate and Faith: The Science, Our Shared Values and Responses
Immersed in the beauty of creation at Holden, we will read about, consider, and discuss one of the greatest threats to both the human and non-human elements of creation. This will be a holistic examination of climate change - the human tendencies that drive it and create barriers to mitigating it. But we cannot leave it at this - we will also examine the responsibilities and opportunities as people of faith to co-create a better, more sustainable way of living in our world.

There must be an emphasis not only on the growth of population but the growth of consumption - in particular the uneven distribution of access to capital and wealth. There is a sustainability science element to this - a relatively simple analysis of available resources in contrast to our consumption of them (our so-called ecological footprint). This can also be considered in longer terms of "planetary boundaries" and the "safe operating space" for humanity. But there is a spiritual component to this too, which I will invite participants to consider - the exchange of spirituality and community for consumption.

Hesla_Bret_TF2020-web.jpgGuest Village Musician – Bret Hesla

Composer/songleader Bret Hesla leads singing for groups of ordinary people. He writes songs that are meant for people to sing together, on themes at the intersection of peacemaking, sustainable living, inclusive community, faith, and everyday life. Bret works to create a culture of collective singing within progressive churches, social change groups, and city parks. In 2010 he cofounded Minnesota Community Sings, leading monthly sings in public places. Bret has worked for over 15 years with St. Paul-based Advocating Change Together, using songleading and collective songwriting to advance civil rights for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. He was a founding member of Bread for the Journey, a Minneapolis-based group specializing in songs of faith, hope, justice and inclusion from progressive Christian communities around the world. His songs, including Dazzling Bouquet and Bread for the Journey, are sung in churches across the country. His most recent compilation, with composer Richard Bruxvoort Colligan, is a worship resource for congregations and other groups working on environmental justice, called Singing Prayers for the Earth: Thirty-one songs that address the climate crisis of ecology and justice. (2017). Bret lives in Minneapolis with his wife Jaimie. They have two children. www.brethesla.com. bret.hesla@gmail.com

Armbrust_Matt_TF2020-web.jpgMatt Armbrust

Matt Armbrust is a multi-faceted artist residing in Twisp, Washington with his wife and 2 children. After receiving an MFA in Ceramics from Central Washington University in 2013, Armbrust spent about a year freelancing as a ceramicist, teaching artist, and violinist before landing positions as Liberty Bell High School Music Teacher, Little Star Montessori Arts Enrichment Specialist, Pipestone Orchestra Conductor, and Principal Violinist of the Tamarack String Quartet.  At Liberty Bell, Armbrust has implemented a curriculum that guides students through a scaffold that teaches, not only the finer points of musicianship, but more importantly compositional approaches and arranging. At Little Star, Armbrust designed a curriculum for preschool students that teaches in succession and through a set of permutations the gamut of art elements and concepts. This curriculum culminated in a formal gallery exhibition where the works were sold and were found to be competitive in the local art market. As Pipestone Orchestra Conductor, Armbrust has implemented a season that focusses on the great Symphonic works of the Common Practice tradition in an effort to put amateurs of all skills in performance settings with top tier professionals. The Tamarack String Quartet affords Armbrust the opportunity to gig frequently and expand his repertoire.  Armbrust also teaches a private violin studio, is published as an art historian with research based in media ecology, and co-owns the Spartan Art Project: an experimental art exhibition and performance space housed in a 1951 Spartan Imperial Mansion travel trailer.

Sessions
How to Community Art and Why
In this session participants will be guided through a selection of historical art and music examples to display how the abstract and affective medium of the arts elicits acute expressions and purpose through use of the few and simple fundamental tools that are the elements of art and music. This session will use these examples to elucidate the "how" and "why" understanding the arts is vital to creating vibrant communities. During the back half of each session, participants will create a collaborative painting that implements the basic elements of art over the course of the sessions. The week will culminate in a formal exhibition of the collaborative works produced.

Hermanson_John_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – John Hermanson

Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, television, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?” which is rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children: Ella, August, and Isak in St. Paul, MN.

Yellowbird_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Leah Yellowbird

Intricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

August 16–22, 2020

Scholtz_Roger_TF2020-web.jpgRoger Scholtz

Roger Scholtz is an ordained pastor in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa (MCSA), currently serving the Kloof Methodist Church in Durban, South Africa. He has a PhD in biblical studies, and teaches as an adjunct on the faculty of the Seth Mokitimi Methodist Seminary in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. Roger is an advocate for the full inclusion of LGBTIQA people within the church, and has been at the forefront of the MCSA's doctrinal engagement with the LGBTIQA conversation, through the church's Doctrine Commission, since the early 2000's. Roger is married and has four children – aged 18, 16, 13 and 3! He is a keen runner, having completed multiple standard and ultra marathons, and has the dubious distinction of arguably being the only person ever to go down Africa's highest water slide in a Carducci suit and preaching gown!

Storey_Alan_TF2020-web.jpgAlan Storey

Alan is a Gospel story-teller located in Cape Town South Africa. Alan serves in and through the Central Methodist Mission and is an ordained Methodist minister. Alan was the last conscientious objector brought to trial in Apartheid South Africa for refusing military conscription. Alan specializes in facilitating Diversity Engagement encounters. These encounters expose entrenched dynamics of power, privilege and prejudice and attempt to heal the divisions that still divide us. Alan believes: To take the whole bible literally is an absurdity; Jesus would much rather be followed than worshiped; The division of the world into "saved" and "un-saved" is hate speech; The holy land is not a place to visit but every place to value; There are around 7.2 billion chosen people in the world; The day will come when all guns will be turned into ploughshares (Alan is chairperson of Gun Free South Africa); An anti-queer Church is an anti-Christ Church; Inequality is the weapon of mass destruction.

Sessions
Living Word
All things new – Christmas
All things new - Baptism and Wilderness
All things new - Good Friday
All things new – Resurrection
All things new - Pentecost

Chevallier_Romy_TF2020_web.jpgRomy Chevallier

Romy Chevallier is a senior policy researcher at the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA), based in Cape Town, South Africa.  Romy holds a BA Honours in Political Science from the University of Stellenbosch and a Master’s degree in International Relations (cum laude) from the University of Witwatersrand. Romy has written extensively on various policy topics related to the sustainable management of marine and coastal ecosystems in southern and east Africa, on climate change negotiations, and on reconciling Africa's growth and development with ecological integrity.
Romy adores the outdoors and the natural environment, especially far off mountain spaces and in the sea, the more remote the better. Romy feels passionately about protecting the natural environment for future generations, particularly in Africa.  Romy is a mother to Kei and wife to Neil Liddell.

Scharen_Chris_TF2020-web.jpgChris Scharen

Chris is the Vice President of Applied Research and the Center for the Study of Theological Education at Auburn Theological Seminary of New York. His academic research and teaching falls in the area of practical theology; focusing on forming leaders of faith and moral courage to face the big justice challenges of the 21st Century. He has written a number of books, including most recently Someone’s Got To Care: The Roots and Hip Hop as Prophetic Vocation (Cascade 2017); the co-authored Christian Practical Wisdom: What it is, Why it matters (Eerdmans 2016); and Fieldwork in Theology: Exploring the Social Context of God's Work in the World (Baker Academic 2015). Chris is currently writing a book called After Laura, a book that is part memoir and part theological engagement with white racial identity. He also is a lover of pies--eating and baking, savory and sweet. Dr. Scharen is married to Sonja, a nurse-midwife and has two children, Isaiah and Finn.

Arnold_Trudy_TF2020-web.jpgTrudy Arnold









Reed_Laura_TF2020-web.jpgLaura Reed

Laura spent her early career working with scientists and activists to change norms and to reduce reliance on military force to resolve conflict. She received her PhD from MIT, with research interests in international security, US foreign policy and disarmament initiatives. Her current interests include collective responses to transnational problems and reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction.

Sessions
Peace, Justice and the Processes of Change
1) Rethinking Peace  2) Rethinking Justice 3) Rethinking Change: Transnational and Intergenerational Perspectives

Will we succeed in taking a necessary leap of faith into a new paradigm of peaceful relations and equitable development, or will we continue along the current path of rising inequality and international tensions?  This three-part workshop will explore what parts of our collective wisdom we should draw upon and what aspects should be discarded.

Shulman_Seth_TF2020-web.jpgSeth Shulman - Editorial Director, Union of Concerned Scientists

Sessions
Cooler, Smarter: Practical Steps for Low-Carbon Living
How can each of us live Cooler Smarter? While the routine decisions that shape our days—what to have for dinner, where to shop, how to get to work—may seem small, collectively they have a big effect on global warming. But which changes in our lifestyles might make the biggest difference to the climate? This science-based workshop explores the most effective ways to cut your own global warming emissions by twenty percent or more, and explains why your individual contribution is so vital to addressing this global problem.

Perry-Thomas-web.jpgThomas Perry

Dr. Tom Perry grew up in the traditional territories of the Miami nation in Indiana, received his PhD. in Linguistics from Indiana University, and began his teaching career at the University of Vienna. He has held positions in Linguistics at the Technical University of Berlin and, since 1978, at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, BC. As part of his academic work, he has been involved in partnerships with First Nations communities over the past 30 years in the delivery post-secondary programs in those communities and in furthering research in First Nations languages and their preservation. He is now retired and lives in the Vancouver area with his spouse Pamela and their cat Gracie.

Sessions
Mapping Settler Privilege: The Settlement of US Territory and its impact on First Nations
Who had to move out so that I could live where I do? That question is not one those of us who descend from America's European settlers are used to asking. It is not a visible issue because most of the territorial changes that were necessary were completed by the end of the 19th century, and our local settler histories rarely say much about that. Using one familiy's history of migration and settlement, this session will explore how First Nations communities were uprooted to make room for farms and cities where this family could live. The session will close with some suggestions for how participants could find out the same information for their own family history.

Holden's First Nations neighbors
Who were the First Nations peoples who lived close by the Railroad Creek valley? This session will provide an overview of the Middle Columbia Salish people who lived around Lake Chelan and in the Methow, Entiat, and Wenatchee River valleys. We will also explore the turmoil of the mid-nineteenth century in the Columbia valley, the drive to bring the railroad and further development to the region, and the eventual loss of the local First Nations' traditional territories and access to their traditional resources.

Wars, Treaties and Reservations: how European settlement in the US got to be such a mess
How did westward settlement become such a nightmare for the first people of this continent?  In this session we will discuss wars used to clear space for European settlers; treaties that led to new wars instead of peace; reservations that were promised and not provided; reservations that were of little use to the people they were intended for, and other examples of mismanagement by territorial, state, and federal governments. This legacy has meant decades of injustice for First Nations people, without adverse effects for settler communities.

Nelson_Laura_TF2020-web.jpgLaura Nelson & Brenna Everson

Laura's passion is to enliven the voices of the people around her, through vocal coaching, improvisation, and singing. As a certified Full Voice coach, she guides people in enhancing and expanding their vocal expression through the Five Elements Framework that uses Earth, Fire, Water, Metal and Air as a metaphor for human vocal qualities. She is a graduate of the Full Voice Institute, based in Minneapolis, MN, where she lives and works with individuals and groups such as the Dakota County Chamber Round Table and Minnesota Shade Tree Short Course. Laura has experience in community song leading, forestry, and environmental education and is currently working toward an M.A. in Counseling at the University of Minnesota. Learn more about her practice at enlivenyourvoice.com.

Everson_Brenna_TF2020-web.jpgBrenna is passionate about creating brave/safe spaces for people to explore expression through voice. She has been writing and leading people in song through the oral tradition since 2012 and has been instrumental in a yearly 300-person outdoor singing camp called Village Fire. She leads community singing events in the Twin Cities of Minnesota and is a certified Full Voice Coach for individuals and groups. She currently has a full time role on the American Public Media Podcasts team at Minnesota Public Radio as a project coordinator.

Sessions
Full Voice: Introduction to the Colors of Your Voice
You are warmly invited to Full Voice: Introduction to the Colors of Your Voice, a group workshop in vocal exploration and play. It is open to all people, whether you view yourself as a singer, a non-singer, someone who fears public speaking, or someone who likes to play with unusual sounds. In these experiential sessions, you will learn about the Full Voice Five Elements Framework which uses Earth, Fire, Water, Metal and Air as a metaphor for qualities of the human voice. When you can access your full range of vocal sound, you can live more authentically and fully expressed. You will get the chance to explore the elements through character play and will be asked to consider how your voice, identity, and personal story intersect. The three-session series will culminate in ritual and story generated by participants.

Voice is more than singing, speaking, and language. It is the way in which our internal world becomes external through sound, body, and soul. As the actress and vocal coach Kristin Linklater says, "to free the voice is to free the person." In these sessions, we aim to free people's voices. We will teach the Full Voice Five Elements Framework, facilitate exploration of the voice and body, and use the communal experience and built trust to engage is provocative discussion on systemic and personal oppression of our voices.

Yellowbird_Leah_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Leah Yellowbird

Intricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

Mertes_Gretchen_TF2020-web.jpgGuest Village Musician - Gretchen Mertes

Pastor Gretchen Mertes is an award-winning singer songwriter based in Seattle, Washington.  An avid guitar-strummer, she loves nothing more than encouraging others to sing, if only so she can sing along.  A life-long Lutheran, Gretchen is a huge fan of traditional liturgy and hymnody, but most especially when it can be turned and shaped into something new that allows it to be re-formed, and hopefully we are transformed right along with it. 

 

 

Parkins_Hallie_TF2020-web.jpgResident Artist – Hallie Parkins








August 23–29, 2020

Howard-Brook_Wes_Ferguson_Johnson_Sue_TF2020-web.jpgWes Howard-Brook & Sue Ferguson-Johnson

Wes Howard-Brook has been teaching, writing and living at the intersection of church, academy and the world since 1988. After a career as an attorney for the US federal government and Washington state governments, Wes left law practice in 1985 to earn a Master of Divinity degree at Seattle University.

Sue Ferguson Johnson is a spiritual director of individuals and couples, retreat leader and Scripture teacher of many years’ experience. Formerly a psychologist, Sue left her practice to engage in full-time ministry in 2001.

Sessions
The Word Made Flesh in us: Living in the Embodied God
The Bible overflows with earthy imagery and countless stories about God experienced in and
through human bodies. Yet for many who claim the Way of Jesus, our bodies can seem more like obstacles than pathways to God. In this series, we will explore the roots of Christian alienation from our bodies, our sexuality and our intimacy with God and one another and invite you into the New Testament vision of bodies transformed by the Holy Spirit into the fleshy, visceral Body of Christ.

Schultz_Rich_TF2020-web.jpgRich Schultz

Dr. Rich Schultz is the Associate Director of the National Geospatial Center of Excellence, in Louisville, Kentucky, although he resides in the suburbs of Chicago. He was formerly an Associate Professor and Endowed Chair at Elmhurst College and served as the Director of Elmhurst College’s GIS Programs. He has also served as an Associate Dean at North Park University. Currently, he is the Senior Administrator of Online Learning at the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy.
He holds a Ph. D. in environmental geochemistry from the University of Cincinnati, an M.S. in geology from Wichita State University and a B.S. in Geology from Illinois State University. He is in his twenty-second year in higher education and is the sole/senior author of more than ninety publications, book chapters, and abstracts. His major areas of research are: geo spatial technologies, unmanned aerial systems, geoscience and sustainability education , global climate change, and the scholarship of teaching and learning. Dr. Schultz was the recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award from the National Council for Geographic Education and was the inaugural recipient of the Richard Collaboration Award For The GIS community.

Sessions
Implementing the UN Sustainable Development Goals with Education
In 2015, the United Nations adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at its core. Subsequently, Asia, Europe, and Australia have undertaken diligent efforts to work towards the ultimate goals of solving the world problems by educating their populations. In the United States, educational efforts have been limited at best, and many Americans are unaware of the SDG’s existence. To that end, an initiative has been undertaken to create K-12 curricula that introduces the SDG’s to educators using foundational technology such that students can learn to address, adopt, and become involved in the SDG movement. This sequential set of sessions creates an open dialogue as to the importance of global issues, how efforts align with God’s Word and plans and why the issues are important to the sustainability of Earth.

Price_Ginny_TF2020-web.jpgGinny Price

Ginny Price grew up in the Lutheran church in Wheeling, WV. She graduated from Geneva College in Beaver Falls, PA with a BS in Psychology and BA in French. Encouraged by her new home congregation, she attended and graduated from the Lutheran seminary in Gettysburg. She was selected for an international internship year in Stockholm, Sweden. Pastor Price has served the church in many capacities. She served 3 congregations as pastor in the De-Md Synod. She also served as an assistant to the bishop for said synod and served at the seminary in Gettysburg as the Director of Admissions and Coordinator of Spiritual Formation. Pastor Price has deeply engaged anti-racism efforts in all of these venues. She was called to the bishop's office to create a synod wide anti-racism team that personally engaged with that work as well as led workshops for leaders across the synod. The team also created the theme for synod assembly and engaged participants in the topic. In the congregation Pastor Price created a Racial Healing team as well as a community group, Conversation in Come-Unity (for more information see The Lutheran, Jan. 2019 - The Gym Pastor), which encourages conversation across color and culture divides. Pastor Price continues to be asked to lead antiracism training for seminary students at ULS (as well as predecessor body of LTSG).

Sessions
Whiteness Revealed; Towards Racial Justice
The participant will have the opportunity to discover through individual and group exercises, through Bible study and presentation, through discussion and video the implications of and the reality of generational comparison due to color and 'race'. The emphasis of the classes is upon personal growth and local community transformation.

Hochstedler_Darren_Bumanglag_John_TF2020-web.jpgGuest Village Musicians Darren Hochstedler & John Bumanglag

Darren is the Director of Worship Arts for Edmonds Lutheran Church. With a strong understanding of Lutheran liturgy and theology, hi passion is using music and performing arts to enliven the worship experience while observing the ancient patterns of worship. He loves coming to Holden with his partner of 15 years and main musical collaborator, John. They especially enjoy encouraging everyone to come and join the daily workshop rehearsals bringing their voice, their spirit, and any instrument they may have brought to the Village. They make sure each person know that their gifts and talents are celebrated!

August 30 – September 5, 2020

Howard-Brook_Wes_Ferguson_Johnson_Sue_TF2020-web.jpgWes Howard-Brook & Sue Ferguson-Johnson

Wes Howard-Brook has been teaching, writing and living at the intersection of church, academy and the world since 1988. After a career as an attorney for the US federal government and Washington state governments, Wes left law practice in 1985 to earn a Master of Divinity degree at Seattle University.

Sue Ferguson Johnson is a spiritual director of individuals and couples, retreat leader and Scripture teacher of many years’ experience. Formerly a psychologist, Sue left her practice to engage in full-time ministry in 2001.

Sessions
The Word Made Flesh in us: Living in the Embodied God
The Bible overflows with earthy imagery and countless stories about God experienced in and
through human bodies. Yet for many who claim the Way of Jesus, our bodies can seem more like obstacles than pathways to God. In this series, we will explore the roots of Christian alienation from our bodies, our sexuality and our intimacy with God and one another and invite you into the New Testament vision of bodies transformed by the Holy Spirit into the fleshy, visceral Body of Christ.

Clark_Ellman_Lacy_TF2020-web.jpgLacy Clark Ellman

Lacy Clark Ellman holds a Master’s degree in Theology and Culture and a certificate in Spiritual Direction, was selected as a New Contemplative by Spiritual Directors International in 2015, and is currently pursuing a Doctor of Ministry. Professionally, she is a spiritual director, maker, and facilitator who speaks the language of pilgrimage and is always ready for the next adventure, having traveled to over twenty countries on four continents. Personally, she is a lover of food, books, spirituality, growing and making things, far-off places and lovely spaces. While traveling, you’ll find her wandering museums and markets, exploring cities by foot, and sampling local fare. At home in Seattle, WA, she loves to garden, take walks in the nearby forest, and go on armchair journeys through her favorite shows from across the pond. Learn more about Lacy's work at asacredjourney.net.

The Holden Village Pilgrimage will be led by Lacy Clark Ellman
Which journey are you on? Holden Village has become a pilgrimage destination of sorts for generations of seekers, with many making special journeys to Holden Village to disconnect from day-to-day life and experience the rest and spiritual renewal that the Cascade Mountains and the Village community have to offer. Now you can make the journey with a guided pilgrimage experience customizable to your own personal journey. Join fellow Villagers for a week of intentional pilgrimage as we allow the wilderness to guide us to the wilds of our soul, forming a community of seekers and discerning where we are on our individual journeys and where God might be leading next.

While it’s traditional for visitors to Holden Village to participate in their own choice of activities during their visit, this pilgrimage experience is slightly different, operating more like a planned retreat. Those interested in this pilgrimage should be ready to commit to participating in each session listed below for both personal and group benefit. We will be a small group which will enhance the intimacy of the experience as we journey together. Register early while space is still available!

Rose McGee

Rose McGee is a sweet potato pie philanthropist and creator of the Sweet Potato Comfort approach – a catalyst for building and strengthening community. In 2014 during the racial disturbance in Ferguson, Rose felt compelled to bake 30 pies and drove them down to coffer comfort. Upon returning home to Golden Valley, MN, she felt a deeper calling. Since then, Sweet Potato Comfort Pie has become a cornerstone service during the MLK Holiday when Rose leads dozens of volunteers of all ages and ethnicities in baking the number of pies Dr. King’s age would have been. Hundreds of community members then convene in story circle discussing race and also determining who to gift the 90 pies (MLK’s age in 2019) throughout the community. Rose is a member of Women Who really Cook, the Women’s Business Development Center, NAACP, was named 2017 Citizen of the Year, 2018 Bill Hobbs Human Rights Award, and in 2019 awarded Bush Foundation’s prestigious Bush Fellowship. She is author of the Books, Story Circle Stories, Kumbayah The Juneteenth Story, and TEDx Talk: The Power of Pie. In 20121, Minnesota Historical Society Press releases her children’s book: Can’t Nobody Make a Sweet Potato Pie like Our Mama.

Sessions
In Story Circle, particpiants will share their own authentic sotries pertaining to rrace, diveristy, and inclusion. These conversations amnng themselves will help them udersatand empathy, strentghs, chllenges, and the power within themselves and each other . Creating the sweet pottato pies together and sharing who the pies will be gifted to innatley builds human connetcedness. Ocverall, sharing and listening to each other becomes a powerful ingredient in the delicious “batter that matters.”

FALL 2020

September 6–19, 2020

Arnold_Steve_TF2020-web.jpgSteve Arnold

Dr. Steve Arnold is a Deacon of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and is a member of the Lutheran Diaconal Association (LDA).  Steve is certified as a Director of Christian Education and as a Lutheran Teacher and has served the Church through parish ministry, teaching at a Lutheran high school, and serving on the faculty of a Lutheran university where he taught parish leadership and lifespan faith formation.mSteve currently serves as a Chaplain at a senior living facility that encompasses assisted living, memory care, transitional care and long term care.  Steve is trained as a certified dementia practitioner and as a Spiritual Director, in the Christian tradition.

Steve is noted as a teacher, retreat leader, speaker, author, chaplain, tour leader and bridge-builder. His work has included a number of cross-cultural and international experiences of bringing Christians together from around the world to learn and grow together.

Steve’s doctoral work and research are in the areas of adult development, with emphases in gerontology. Specific application of these studies have been made to transitions in faith formation throughout the life span. Special focus in the research has been to equip adults for developing increased responsibility for personal life and development in the third-third of life.

Sessions
Aging Boldly: Launching into The Third-Third of Life
Life is a journey.  Aging begins at conception and the issues of aging develop across the lifespan.  Each new chapter introduces new opportunities to live with boldness and dignity.  In the time together, participants will explore the principles and frameworks for aging successfully and with a sense of boldness.  This will be an informational time and a reflective time and is an experience for all ages.

Samuelson_Mark_TF2020-web.jpgMark Samuelson

Mark has written three novels and numerous poems.  Writing is a passion for him, and he enjoys helping others by both encouraging creative writing in others and sharing his gifts.  He was educated at St. Olaf College and Luther Seminary.  He enjoys hiking, reading and travel.  He is married to Ann, has two sons, Erik and Josh and three grandchildren, Emma, Lily and Wendel.

Sessions
Writing for Healing
Writing for healing was developed as a way to encourage Breast Cancer patients and survivors to articulate their feelings and needs.  Participants will be guided to write by prompts provided by the instructor, often keeping a journal of their writing.  They will be asked to share their writing aloud with the others in the group in a non-threatening way, always with the possibility of declining. The goal of the workshop is the healing and affirmation of the writer.

The workshop rests on five essential affirmations: (from “Writing Alone and with Others”, by Pat Schneider)
1.    Everyone has a strong, unique voice.
2.    Everyone is born with creative genius.
3.    Writing as an art form belongs to all people, regardless of economic class or educational level.
4.    The teaching of the craft can be done without damage to a writer’s original voice or artistic self-esteem.
5.    A writer is someone who writes

September 27 – October 10, 2020

Chang_Terrill_TF2020-web.jpgTerrill Chang

Terrill Chang grew up in Honolulu before Hawaii became a state, in the second generation of Chinese born in America.  His Island upbringing included going barefoot; love of food from many nations; and laughter-filled gatherings of extended family (everyone older is called Auntie or Uncle). He learned to value the Hawaiians' love and respect for the earth, mauka to makai, mountains to ocean. His Chinese upbringing included respect for elders, education, and traditions; and food. Western influences included attending a school founded by missionaries in 1841; science, Latin and German. He left Hawaii for the East Coast, receiving degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Business from MIT.  He returned to the West Coast to earn a Masters at Oregon State. He and his wife Jan reside in the seaside town of Burien, just south of Seattle.

He is a decades-long student of Tai Chi and likes to convene informal practices on the Snack Bar deck.  He brings his diverse cultural and educational background and is as long-standing member of the Science and Technology Committee.  He reads and putters in the garden.  And enjoys cooking and eating.

Sessions
Discovering Tai Chi Together
With respect to the Mind-Body-Spirit continuum, it might be said that we spend up to 2/3 of our time in our mind and/or spirit, but we spend 100% of our time in our bodies. Discovering Tai Chi Together approaches Holden's theme of Re-formation by way of the body. We discuss and then do gentle movement, creating an awareness of balance and energy. This movement allows us to explore topics such as sense of self (many faceted); opposing forces (difficult situations); flexibility (body and beliefs); balance (physical and work/play); respect (self and others); and appreciation/gratitude (for internal and external environments). 

Further Explorations into Tai Chi
Further Explorations into Tai Chi uses a body-centric approach to personal Re-formation.  We discuss and then do gentle movement, creating an awareness of balance and energy.  This movement allows us to explore topics such as sense of self; opposing forces (difficult situations); flexibility (body and beliefs); balance (physical and work/play); respect (self and others); and appreciation/gratitude (for internal and external environments). 

Faith to go out with Tai Chi
Faith to go out with Tai Chi uses a body-centric approach to personal Re-formation.  The focus of this third session is to look at Tai Chi practices that are transferable to life in the “outside world.”  These include flexibility (body and beliefs); balance (physical and work/play); respect (self and others); and appreciation/gratitude (for internal and external environments).