Summer Teaching Faculty

2018 Summer Conversation: Fear Not

Holden's visiting summer faculty form the backbone of our educational programming. View the information below to learn more about each of Holden's 2018 visiting faculty members and their sessions.

2018 Recommended Reading

June 9-15, 2018

Dr. Tod Trimble

Tod_Trimble_portrait_color.jpgGuest Village Musician
Following work in Greenville, Pennsylvania, as tenured associate professor of music, chair of the department, and director of the college choir at Thiel College (ELCA), Tod Trimble worked for over a decade administering national and international conferences for college and university music faculty. He now serves as organist and director of music ministries at St. Paul Lutheran Church in Missoula, Montana. On behalf of the American Association of Lutheran Musicians, He is organizing three summer 2018 workshops for church musicians in Montana, and will serve as conference chair for ALCM’s 2019 biennial national conference, to be held in Portland, Oregon. Initially trained at Millikin University, Trimble was a student of Richard Hoffland. (Hoffland also taught alongside Paul Christiansen in the Christiansen Choral Summer Workshops.) Trimble later received degrees from the Universities of Denver (Master of Arts, Choral Music), Wyoming (Master of Science, Psychology), and Illinois (Doctor of Musical Arts, Choral Music). Trimble’s wife, Monica, is a medical social worker, and they have three grown children.

June 11-15, 2018

Joe Davis

Joe_Davis1.jpgJoe Davis is a nationally-touring writer, speaker, and performer based in Minneapolis, MN. He is the frontman of emerging soul, funk, and spoken word ensemble, The Poetic Diaspora, and the co-founder and Artistic Director of H-Cubed: Harrison, Healing, and Harmony, a monthly event series centered on healing through the arts. As a student and educator, he has served as teaching artist at dozens of high schools and universities, most recently the Artist-in- Residence at Luther Seminary, receiving a masters in Theology of the Arts.

Session: Spitting Fire: Spoken Word Poetry & The Embodied Imagination
Nationally-touring spoken word poet and teaching artist Joe Davis will explore the history and culture of spoken word poetry as a tool for individual and collective healing and transformation. Participants can expect to actively engage in the creative process of crafting and embodying their personal narratives and further cultivating their connections with communities both similar and different from their own.

 

Dr. Carl Hughes

Screen_Shot_2018-01-09_at_1.56.32_PM.pngDr. Carl S. Hughes teaches historical and constructive theology at Texas Lutheran University in Seguin, TX. His interests focus on the legacies and challenges of the Lutheran theological tradition and how they relate to struggles for justice in society today. He is currently working on a book on how Luther’s theology of the cross can inform biblical interpretation so that it promotes spiritual growth and social transformation, particularly in matters related to race. Hughes is the author of Kierkegaard and the Staging of Desire: Rhetoric and Performance in a Theology of Eros (Fordham University Press, 2014) and a contributor to Radical Lutherans/Lutheran Radicals, edited by Jason Mahn (Cascade, 2017).

Session: Re-Forming Biblical Reading
Luther is famous for reforming Christian attitudes toward the Bible. He sought a sola scriptura foundation for theology, put the Bible into the hands of ordinary Christians, and gave them the tools to read scripture for themselves. In opposition to medieval interpreters, he insisted that biblical meaning should be understood to be clear and unitary, and he valorized the “plain” or “literal” sense of the text. These moves can be said to have sowed seeds for both the modern historical-critical method and modern fundamentalism. Lutherans have good reasons to be proud of many of Luther’s contributions to the history of biblical interpretation. However, this course will focus primarily on what was lost or neglected in practices of biblical reading as a result of the reformation. What insights of ancient and medieval interpreters might prove valuable for Christian communities today? How might ancient aesthetic and contemplative patterns inform how we read the Bible now? In what ways might practices such as lectio divina, allegory, and the “rule of charity” be resources for Christians in 2018 and beyond? The course will focus particularly on connecting biblical reading to art, aesthetics, and spirituality, on the one hand, and to overcoming social injustices related to race and sexual orientation, on the other.

Dr. Sharon Varallo

Screen_Shot_2018-01-09_at_2.15.38_PM.pngSharon Varallo teaches in the Department of Communication Studies at Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois. Her scholarly interests originated in relational communication and include cultural expressions of time. In recent years her interests have taken a sharp turn toward justice, particularly toward racial and criminal justice and intercultural competence as a gateway toward social justice activism. She has enjoyed teaching and learning in numerous off-campus programs (including in Mexico, Peru, China, Japan, Spain, Morocco and the wilderness of Holden Village in winter).

Sessions: Cultural Approaches to “Time”

“What Time Is It?”
This session addresses different cultural approaches to “time” and to the clock, and offers a framework to imagine our lives operating in a different time culture.

“Running Out of Time”
Participants will learn about concepts of time scarcity and pace, including research in psychology and communication about “hurrysickness” and its effects on relationships and community. In the end, we’ll strategize.


Killing'ot Lembikas & Travis Houle

20180522_KillingotLembikasSMALL_HannahLauber.jpgKilling’ot Lembikas grew up a Maasai boy in tropical savanna in Tanzania. Apart from primary education in early years, he went to school in Maasai land, in the first secondary school built in Maasai land in Ngorongoro District in Tanzania and succeeded to university level education in another part of Tanzania. At the time all he knew was about his cultural background in the natural environment in the dispersals of the Serengeti tropical savanna and wellbeing as a Maasai boy and a Shepard had a sense of dreams and survival in his life. Maasai proverbs in habitat and survival, at the windows of cow dung houses while experiencing the sound of nature and textbooks in classrooms in modern journey of his education, all had made him sure that he understood something behind the forces of social changes while also being a human entity in so many different ways which made him proud to be a Maasai boy. The role of his life was to attend his livestock as a brave Shepard boy, as a nomadic pastoralist, which, based on natural environmental conservation and interactions with nature for survival in a sense of accessing the natural resources and what nature gave him as Maasai, was dear. Passing the Maasai rituals from different stages of the rites has equipped Lembikas to know all the traditions, norms and values of the Maasai society. He was among of the Moran (warrior) in society, and brought cattle to be grazed near the borders of Serengeti National Park during warrior hood. He participated in the delegation of killing a lion several times, as a tradition and rite passage of the Maasai warrior. His bachelor’s degree in History and English has been a cornerstone to his professionalism and skills. Teaching History of Africa, European societies and the United States is pretty significant to his skills of learning about economic activities, culture, heritages, social changes, progress and development of different models. English has also been a significant subject in learning language itself, literature and restoring the same literature of his culture in relation to other literatures of oral and written traditions. Other skills of wildlife, environment and conservation has made his journey of learning, teaching and helping others in dialogues, research and documentations.


20171103_Travis_Aj_Williams_1_of_1.jpgTrained in his undergraduate as a scientist, Travis Houle is now working to use listening, communicating, and teaching as a means to building bridges between each other and the natural world around us. The world is in the midst of a moral, ecological, and spiritual crisis. As change occurs across our planet, it is paramount that we better understand and listen to the voice of peoples, ecosystems, & our hearts, equipping these voices with the means to a brighter future. Most recently working as the Naturalist at Holden, he has worked to try and bridge diverse perspectives on environmental issues, connecting people with the natural world through educational sessions. His history with Killing’ot Lembikas is as a friend and student. Lembikas was a guide and teacher for Houle’s study group which visited northern Tanzania as a J-Term program from Luther College. After graduating college, Houle traveled to Lembikas’ village (boma) in the bush, less than 5 miles from the border of the Serengeti, for his wedding & to learn more about Maasai culture. Now, Houle is working to help connect Lembikas with teachers and schools within the United States, as Houle sees him as a potentially huge force for change in Tanzania. Houle plans to support Lembikas’ teaching at Holden, help to bridge differences between cultures, and help to add context to Lembikas’ situation. In order to work towards diversity, we need to concede our own place and support those who deserve to be lifted up.

Session: Cultural and Ecological Change in East Africa: A Maasai Perspective
The Maasai, a traditionally pastoralist indigenous tribe located across Tanzania and Kenya, are being impacted by a number of cultural & ecological changes, mostly impacted by foreign influencers. Over three sessions we will explore how the Maasai people and steppe ecosystem is being impacted by this cultural and ecological change, and the pathway forward towards a sustainable future. Participants will learn systematically the human social conditions in Maasailand. They will also learn to observe, theorize and interpret the changes and content as a means of inquiring into human social relations. Demonstrate awareness of cultural values of aboriginal people Demonstrate knowledge of diversity. Demonstrate knowledge of ecological conditions & change.


Professor Vickie Phipps

Vickie_Phipps.jpgVickie R. Phipps teaches in the Art Department at Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois.  Vickie sees art and design as not only a desirable mode of community engagement but a human propensity that when cultivated results in a dynamic engagement with our world. She enjoys the outdoors, sports, art, and teaching. Most recently she has enjoyed learning and teaching on the road in such places as Germany, Poland, Japan, Ghana, Morocco, Senegal, and The Netherlands.

Sessions:

Design & Culture Improv Workshop: Speculative Design  
This workshop will be an exploration of design and how meaning is made. We will examine design as provocation. Participants will work within an open studio format to generate ideas, create mock-ups and present group ideas in response to workshop provocations that ask: “What kind of world do we want to live in?”

Design & Culture Improv Workshop: Identity   
This workshop will be an exploration of design and how meaning is made. We will examine design and identity through a range of cultural expressions including architecture, art, public space, personal identity, and national identity.

Design & Culture Improv Workshop: Needs and Values
This workshop will be an exploration of design and how meaning is made. We will examine design and culture with a focus on human needs and human values.  Participants will work within an open studio format to generate ideas, create mock-ups and present group ideas in response to workshop provocations that asks “What do we want? What do we need? What do we value?”


Rev. Mindy Roll

Mindy_Roll1.jpgPastor Mindy Roll is the Lutheran Campus Pastor at Texas A&M and Blinn College, a ministry known as Treehouse, where she has served since 2010. She is a 2007 graduate of Yale Divinity School (M.Div), a 2011 graduate of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg (STM, Pastoral Theology), and is currently working on a DMin at Brite Divinity School. Mindy is married to Tom Ham, an architect (they first met at Holden!), and they have two small children, Andrew (4) and Linden (2).

Session: Re-Forming Worship
What makes worship meaningful? What is worship actually about? How might we explore new expressions of worship while grounding ourselves in the traditions that have sustained the church for thousands of years? Join us as we explore, experience, and learn how to incorporate three newer expressions of worship (The Living Room, The Journey, and Grown Up Camp).

June 15-August 15, 2018

John Hermanson

John_Hermanson.jpgResident Musician
Songwriter/composer/liturgist John Hermanson grew up in Bozeman, Montana and graduated from St. Olaf College in 1993 with a self-designed Interreligious Dialogue major. He is a member of the acoustic duo Storyhill and co-owner of Egg Music, a music house specializing in creating original music for film, TV, advertising, and public art. Egg Music produces the acclaimed short film series Motion Poems, now in its eighth season. John has composed a large and growing catalog of liturgical and worship music. His latest album, Isaiah, draws from the books of Isaiah and Micah. In 2010 Hermanson composed a liturgy called, “Is This the Feast of Victory?,” rooted in the traditional Lutheran liturgy, that has been used by a variety of worship communities around the country. John lives with his wife Bettine and 3 children, Ella, August, and Isak, in St. Paul, MN.

June 17-22, 2018

Andrea Sorum & Conie Borchardt

Guest Village Musicians
AndreaSorum.pngAndrea was born to two rural Lutheran pastors and an upright piano. Music and singing, specifically have always been the main way she experiences and understands spirituality. She studied piano, voice, flute and organ through high school and was the student conductor of the Southeast Minnesota High School Honors Choir. At Concordia College, Moorhead, she studied voice, piano and organ and sang in all the choirs. She released “American Dreams” in April of 2016 and in August 2016 started as Music Director at Calvary Lutheran Church. She collects and shares songs specifically by and for movements (Standing Rock, BLM, 350.rog, Minnesota Interfaith Power and Light) and for faith communities. She recently began working as Music Coordinator at United Theological seminary where she is planning chapel services with a religiously diverse student body.

borchardt_conie1.jpgPaperless aural tradition singing reinvigorated Conie Borchardt's musical life in 2006 when she passionately sang "Lasagna!" with a group of women leaders in a voice coaching session.  What came next was an invitation to a monthly song circle, and then a hospice/comfort choir, Dances of Universal Peace, and Music that Makes Community, all of which continue to draw on her leadership.  Conie has a Bachelor of Arts degree in music from Augsburg College where she studied piano and music therapy and continues to learn more about the world around her with certificates in spiritual direction (Transforming Soul and Society-Wisdom Ways, St. Paul, MN), Full Voice Coaching (Barbara McAfee), and a fellowship with the Creative Community Leadership Institute (Intermedia Arts, Minneapolis, MN).  Though her roots are in southern Minnesota, Conie now resides in St. Paul, where she leads songs at Table 229, a recently birthed dinner church, and the music for St. Mary's Episcopal Church's 9am experimental service.

June 18-22, 2018

Joe Davis

Joe_Davis1.jpgJoe Davis is a nationally-touring writer, speaker, and performer based in Minneapolis, MN. He is the frontman of emerging soul, funk, and spoken word ensemble, The Poetic Diaspora, and the co-founder and Artistic Director of H-Cubed: Harrison, Healing, and Harmony, a monthly event series centered on healing through the arts. As a student and educator, he has served as teaching artist at dozens of high schools and universities, most recently the Artist-in-Residence at Luther Seminary, receiving a masters in Theology of the Arts.

Session: Spitting Fire: Spoken Word Poetry & The Embodied Imagination
Nationally-touring spoken word poet and teaching artist Joe Davis will explore the history and culture of spoken word poetry as a tool for individual and collective healing and transformation. Participants can expect to actively engage in the creative process of crafting and embodying their personal narratives and further cultivating their connections with communities both similar and different from their own.


Professor Hal Taussig

Taussig.jpgHal Taussig is Visiting Professor of New Testament at Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he has taught masters and doctoral level studies since 1998. He also is Professor of Early Christianity at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia. He has retired from 30+ years as a United Methodist pastor, and now is specially assigned by his bishop as a consultant to local congregations.

Session: The Acts of Thecla: Woman Rebel, Teacher, and Healer from the Early Jesus Movements
One of the favorite stories from the first two centuries of the Jesus movements is the Acts of Thecla, a vibrant story of a young woman who rejects her family and battles the government in order to join the Apostle Paul to become a teacher and healer like him.  The course examines the social and spiritual meanings of this narrative for both the ancient Christ movements and for the 21st century.  This course means to accompany the course taught by Natalie Renee Perkins, Acting and Singing Thecla: Herstory Comes Alive.


Natalie Perkins

Natalie_Renee2.jpgNatalie Renee Perkins is a professional performer and proud member of the Actors’ Equity Association. She has traveled internationally with two major cruise lines, toured the country with Hairspray and RENT, been a featured singer with multiple symphony orchestras, and performs regularly with the USO Show Troupe. This past year she has been seen as "Deloris" in Sister Act, "Annie" in It Shoulda Been You and returned to the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s holiday production– Yuletide Celebration– for the second year in a row. Natalie received her Masters of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York where she focused on Theology and the Arts– with Womanism, Scripturalization, and extra canonical texts at the heart of her studies. During her time at Union, she composed original music from the text of six of the Odes of Solomon. She now engages our earliest tradition with our contemporary society through a social justice lens as a writer (contributor for the Daily Guideposts), lecturer, preacher, chaplain (NYU) and composer.  She is also a co-founder of the newly formed Tanho Center. Additionally, she facilitates discussions on social equality (specifically but not limited to race/racism). Her insatiable curiosity regarding our earliest Jesus-following tradition led her professor, Hal Taussig, to introduce her to the Westar Institute. She began working with this institute as a founding member of their Praxis Forum (formerly Young Leaders in Religion) in 2014 and is working on a podcast, called Better Not Mention It, that aims to bridge the gap between religious scholarship and the general population.

Session: Acting and Singing Thecla: Her Story Comes Alive
This course designs and produces a short musical in a week about the first and second century story of Thecla, a young woman who rejects family and battles violent Roman government to join the Apostle Paul to become a teacher and healer like him.  Renowned actress, chaplain, and songwriter Natalie Renee Perkins leads the class in designing and enacting the musical on Thecla.  This course is meant to accompany the Living Word course: The Acts of Thecla: Woman Rebel, Teacher, and Healer from the Early Jesus Movements taught by Hal Taussig.


Dr. Kristen Benson

2_Benson_Kristen1.jpgKristen Benson, Ph.D., LMFT, is an Assistant Professor of Marriage and Family Therapy at Appalachian State University. She earned her Ph.D. in Human Development from Virginia Tech with an emphasis in Marriage and Family Therapy. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist. She feels a call to engage in social justice work professionally, personally, and faithfully. Kristen’s research and clinical focus is on providing inclusive and supportive therapy to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) people and relationships. Her current research explores the experiences of families with transgender and gender creative children. She has published and presented her research nationally and internationally. Kristen is a clinical fellow of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and a member of the National Council on Family Relations. She recently relocated to Boone, N.C. where she enjoys the Blue Ridge Mountains with her daughter Viola and lab named Boone.

Sessions:

Youth Talk: Gender, Justice, and Faith
This session is open to young people. Our time together will focus on questions, ideas, wonderings, and exploration on the intersections of gender, gender identity, race, social justice, and faith.

Everything I wanted to know about supporting LGBTQ youth but didn’t know to ask: A conversation with faithful adults
This session is open to adults who are and/or want to be supportive to LGBTQ young people. We will discuss youth culture, the spectrum of sexual and gender identities, and what youth need from adults to thrive!

An All-Ages Conversation about Gender, Love, Justice, and Faith
This session is open to people of all ages who are interested in sexual and gender identities, love, justice, and faith. A multigenerational conversation about topics that can be difficult to talk about. We will share multiple perspectives on language, needs, and hopes. Increase shared understandings of sexual orientation and gender identity.


Dr. Laura Hartman

Hartman_Laura_2017_small1.jpgLaura is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at Roanoke College.  She is trained in the study of religion and environment, environmental ethics, and environmental humanities more broadly. Her specialties include Christian ethics as it applies to consumption, transportation, climate engineering, and ecological restoration. She lives in Oshkosh, Wisconsin with her wonderful wife, Anne, and incomparable 2nd grade son, Theo.

Sessions:

Justice on Earth: Food Justice
Food deserts, farmworker justice, food waste… The problems inherent in our food system can seem overwhelming when we start to truly face them. And yet, in our houses of worship we encounter another view of food: a blessing that is taken, broken, blessed, and shared; an encounter with divinity as we “taste and see”; an abundance and joy through potlucks and soup kitchens. In this course, we use the tools of Christian ethics to examine the environmental and social dimensions of our American food system, with special attention to the role of communities of faith in addressing problems.

Justice on Earth: Animal Justice
Seeking just relationships with non-human animals is a vital component of justice on this earth. In this class we ask ourselves the hard questions about how we relate to the animals in our lives: the ones we pet, the ones we eat, the ones we share our ecosystems with. These creatures who Francis of Assisi called his kin: can they be used to fulfill human needs while also being respected? Don’t worry: no one will shame you into changing your eating habits in this class and no graphic images of violence against animals will be included. But do come with an open mind, ready to re-think the demands of justice – including racial and gender justice – as they relate to the non-human animals in our lives.

Justice on Earth: Climate Justice
The climate crisis is unjust: future generations are harmed by the actions of the present and past; the poor suffer from floods and droughts when they did not cause the globe to warm; and our global political systems addressing the problem are rather dysfunctional and unjust. Some have called climate change the world’s biggest environmental injustice. What is a person of faithful conscience to do? In this session we examine insights from Pope Francis, Al Gore, and other religious and secular resources to articulate our own climate ethic.


Rev. Dr. Roger Scholtz

roger_scholtz1.jpgOver the past 25 years Scholtz has pastored four congregations in diverse contexts as an ordained minister in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa (MCSA). He has also served as the interim senior pastor at Hyde Park UMC in Tampa, Florida. He’s passionate about communicating the gospel in ways that bring the scriptures alive for people navigating the challenging intersection of faith and life in our contemporary, ever-changing culture. Scholtz believes that the building of radically inclusive, richly diverse missional communities of reconciliation and hope is a key need for our time. Christ-centered servant leadership, solidarity with the poor, empowering the voiceless, celebrating  diversity, non-judgmentalism, compassion for the earth, creative storytelling, laughter and authentic worship are essential values for realizing this vision to which he is deeply committed. Scholtz has a PhD in Biblical Studies, and serves on the faculty as an adjunct at the Seth Mokitimi Methodist Seminary in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He is an advocate for the full inclusion of LGBTIQA people within the church, and has been at the forefront of the MCSA’s doctrinal engagement with the LGBTIQA conversation for the past fourteen years. Scholtz is married and has four children (and has the dubious distinction of arguably being the only person to ever go down Africa’s highest water slide in a Carducci suit!)

Sessions:

A Journey of Disillusionment: William Blake’s Illustrations of the Book of Job as guide to the process of spiritual awakening and religious transformation.
William Blake’s Illustrations of the Book of Job offer an unparalleled visual commentary on the biblical book of Job in charting his journey of spiritual awakening to truer pictures of God. This journey of descent and ascent describes the necessary disillusionments needed for religious consciousness to be transformed.

The Economics of Reconciliation
Drawing on insights from the South African story of the transition to democracy and the painful economic realities of post-Apartheid South Africa, as well as some of the parables of Jesus, this session will explore the stumbling blocks of economic privilege and disempowerment that easily derail the pursuit of reconciliation.

History and Her story: Voices beyond the page
There’s a long and painful tradition of the voices of women being silenced in the patriarchal pages of history that stretches way back into the biblical witness. In this session the largely silenced voices of various female biblical characters – Dinah, Abigail, Job’s wife – will be heard afresh as a rehearsal of the sacred task of hearing the untold stories of the voiceless in our midst.


Dr. Molly Secor-Turner & Dr. Scott Harpin

Molly_Secor-Turner1.jpgMolly Secor-Turner, PhD, RN is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing and Department of Public Health at North Dakota State University. Her research examines the influence of social context on adolescent health. In particular, she uses her research to advocate for the health and well-being of adolescents from a human rights perspective. Her research bridges across place through the universal experience of adolescence from rural North Dakota to rural Kenya and among high-risk youth in Fargo.

Scott Harpin is an associate professor at the University of Colorado College of Nursing. His 17 year career in public health nursing included working Harpin_bearded1.jpgwith the most at-risk children and adolescents in Minneapolis and Denver. His research examines youth risk behaviors and mental health promotion particularly among the most vulnerable in our communities.

Sessions:

Fostering Healthy Youth Development in our Busy World

Participants will learn about healthy youth development, and how the concept of adolescent development has shifted over the past 2 generations. We will describe best practices for addressing and communicating with youth about health and risk behaviors with an orientation to “harm reduction” strategies in our families and communities. Hot topics of marijuana legalization, sexuality health education, and mental health promotion strategies will be addressed as exemplars of how participations can apply healthy youth development frameworks to their lives.

Exploring our Sexuality in the Context of Faith
In this interactive session, participants will explore how faith and values shape our expressions of sexuality. Aimed at high-school aged youth and young adults, age appropriate, medically-accurate information will be shared with participants to help them clarify their values, build interpersonal skills, and understand the spiritual, emotional, and social aspects of sexuality guided by the Our Whole Lives evidence-based sexuality education curriculum.

Creating Healthy Environments for Youth: The Role of Social Justice Advocacy
Participants will build on knowledge gained from our previous 2 symposia, leaving Holden Village with a clear personal plan for engaging youth and adults in advocating for a youth health issue of interest. The focus of this symposia will be on message framing and advocacy skill-building to incorporate a faith-based perspective as a core value of social justice. Presenters will first present an overview of legislative action at local, state, and federal levels impacting teen health, and invite participants’ own examples of interfacing with policy systems. The balance of the presentation will be the “communication/message triangle” used for advocacy efforts (i.e., testimony, media interviewing, public presentations, etc), with application to a social issue of interest to the participant.


Rev. Julie Boleyn & Rev. Jeanine Reardon

Julie_Boleyn.jpgThe Rev. Julie Boleyn is a pastor in Berwyn, Illinois, a town of approximately 56,000 people. She serves as pastor to both Unity Lutheran, and Comunidad Unida (a new bilingual, intercultural worshiping community). Under her leadership Unity Lutheran launched Awake! Time to Rise, a community development organization that specializes in education and engagement. This organization has incubated other groups, of which Julie has been a part. This includes Berwyn Comunidad en Accíon, a group that has organized around social justice issues in Berwyn, including facilitating the passage of a Welcoming City Ordinance, and increasing the minimum wage. The group is currently working to support DACA recipients, and other immigrants. Julie lives in Berwyn with her spouse, Jeanine Reardon, and their 8-year-old daughter Madelyn.

Jeanine_Reardon.jpgThe Rev. Jeanine Reardon is a pastor serving as a Clinical Pastoral Education Supervisor. In her work, she helps her students understand their own gifts as resource in their ministry. She also serves Berwyn on city council as the 3rd Ward Alderman. She uses her gifts as a chaplain in tending to the heartbreak and hope of the community, helping the community connect across difference. Jeanine was elected as part of a slate of candidates that drastically improved the diversity of civic leadership, raising up Latino and gay and lesbian candidates for service.

Sessions:

Engaging Community: Who am I in community?
In this session we will explore the gifts and challenges we bring to the work of community engagement. How do I understand power? Am I open to difference? What sabotages the work we feel called to do?
Attendees will learn about power dynamics, a developmental model for understanding cultural difference, and a method for setting goals that both challenges, and addresses our tendency toward self-sabotage.

Engaging Community: What does my community need?
In this session we will begin to discern the heartbreaks and the joys present in our communities and how we may be called to attend to them.

Engaging Community: What does leadership look like?
In this session we will explore the dynamics of gracious leadership in community. We’ll explore the gifts and challenges of a people-centered movement, that truly believes that God is already at work in our context.

June 23-29, 2018

Steve Wolbrecht

Guest Village Musician
Steve_Wolbreacht.jpgWhile Steve Wolbrecht’s day job is as an engineer for Honeywell Aerospace, his vocation is in music. He is the lead composer for Dead Gentlemen Productions and Zombie Orpheus Entertainment, having scored a dozen feature and short films to date, and routinely serves as a substitute accompanist for Lutheran churches in the Tacoma area.

 

June 25-29, 2018

Professor Hal Taussig

Taussig.jpgHal Taussig is Visiting Professor of New Testament at Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he has taught masters and doctoral level studies since 1998. He also is Professor of Early Christianity at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia. He has retired from 30+ years as a United Methodist pastor, and now is specially assigned by his bishop as a consultant to local congregations.

Sessions:

The Acts of Thecla: Woman Rebel, Teacher, and Healer from the Early Jesus Movements
One of the favorite stories from the first two centuries of the Jesus movements is the Acts of Thecla, a vibrant story of a young woman who rejects her family and battles the government in order to join the Apostle Paul to become a teacher and healer like him.  The course examines the social and spiritual meanings of this narrative for both the ancient Christ movements and for the 21st century.  This course means to accompany the course taught by Natalie Renee Perkins, Acting and Singing Thecla: Herstory Comes Alive.

Living Word as Practice: An Embodied Approach to the Gospels taught by Hal Taussig
The living word in the writings of the first two centuries of Jesus movements was more story, poem, prayer, song, and drama than doctrine.  This course removes the didactics and dogma in these living words in order to let a social body in the 21st century breathe, sing, and think organically.  Gospels inside and outside the canon lead this spirited study.

 

Natalie Perkins

Natalie_Renee2.jpgNatalie Renee Perkins is a professional performer and proud member of the Actors’ Equity Association. She has traveled internationally with two major cruise lines, toured the country with Hairspray and RENT, been a featured singer with multiple symphony orchestras, and performs regularly with the USO Show Troupe. This past year she has been seen as "Deloris" in Sister Act, "Annie" in It Shoulda Been You and returned to the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s holiday production– Yuletide Celebration– for the second year in a row. Natalie received her Masters of Divinity from Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York where she focused on Theology and the Arts– with Womanism, Scripturalization, and extra canonical texts at the heart of her studies. During her time at Union, she composed original music from the text of six of the Odes of Solomon. She now engages our earliest tradition with our contemporary society through a social justice lens as a writer (contributor for the Daily Guideposts), lecturer, preacher, chaplain (NYU) and composer.  She is also a co-founder of the newly formed Tanho Center. Additionally, she facilitates discussions on social equality (specifically but not limited to race/racism). Her insatiable curiosity regarding our earliest Jesus-following tradition led her professor, Hal Taussig, to introduce her to the Westar Institute. She began working with this institute as a founding member of their Praxis Forum (formerly Young Leaders in Religion) in 2014 and is working on a podcast, called Better Not Mention It, that aims to bridge the gap between religious scholarship and the general population.

Session: Acting and Singing Thecla: Her Story Comes Alive
This course designs and produces a short musical in a week about the first and second century story of Thecla, a young woman who rejects family and battles violent Roman government to join the Apostle Paul to become a teacher and healer like him.  Renowned actress, chaplain, and songwriter Natalie Renee Perkins leads the class in designing and enacting the musical on Thecla.  This course is meant to accompany the Living Word course: The Acts of Thecla: Woman Rebel, Teacher, and Healer from the Early Jesus Movements taught by Hal Taussig.


Rev. Dr. Barbara Rossing

Rossing.jpgBarbara Rossing first came to Holden as Waitri in 1973 and also served as Village pastor 1986-88. She is professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, where she also directs the seminary’s environmental ministry emphasis. Her publications include The Rapture Exposed: The Message of Hope in the Book of Revelation (Basic Books, 2004); Journeys Through Revelation: Apocalyptic Hope for Today (Presbyterian Church USA, 2010); “Revelation” in The Fortress Commentary on the Bible (2014), and articles and book chapters on the Bible and ecology, including the Lutheran World Federation's publication "Creation-- Not For Sale." She chairs the Society of Biblical Literature's Ecological Hermeneutics section, and is active in public theology in both the scholarly academy and the church, working on climate change and the Bible. She loves working on the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017, including ecumenical responses to Pope Francis’s encyclical letter on climate change. She received the MDiv degree from Yale University Divinity School, and the ThD from Harvard University.

Session: Illness, Healing, World-Healing and Disability in the Bible
Jesus' "miracles," as typically described, can pose problems for modern faith, especially in light of science. If miracles are treated in isolation, and defined as "supernatural," they transgress the scientific laws of nature that are part of God's creation. When  some individuals are healed but others are not, we risk pitting individuals against each other. Drawing on medical anthropology and liberation theology we can understand stories of Jesus’s healings in a broader social and community context. Jesus leverages spiritual power for healing and liberation, in enacting the kingdom of God. In session 3 we also draw on field of disability studies and scholarship on African churches' responses to HIV/AIDS. Healing becomes defined not as "cure" from HIV/AIDS but as a circle of care.


Seth McClellan

seth_mcclellan_headshot_3.jpgSeth McClellan has made documentary and fictional films that have played at many film festivals and on TV, including King in Chicago about Dr. King’s work with the Chicago Freedom Movement and Little Wound’s Warriors about youth on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.  He also teaches at Triton College and lives in Oak Park, just outside of Chicago.

Session: Films of Complex Faith
Join filmmaker and professor Seth McClellan to watch intense cinematic stories of faith from around the world.  View these masterpieces with a brief lecture and discussion to follow. Some subject matter may not be suitable for young or sensitive viewers.


Representative Drew Hansen

Drew_Hansen.jpgRepresentative Drew Hansen is the author of the Dream: Martin Luther King and the Speech That Inspired a Nation., which U.S. Representative John Lewis called “a great contribution to the history of the movement.”  Hansen has appeared on ABC’s World News Tonight, BCS’s Early Show, CSPAN’s Book TV, CNNfn, and on NPR and dozens of radio shows in the US and around the world. He is a member of the Washington State House of Representatives, where he has served since 2011.  He graduated from Yale law School and from Harvard University, summa cum laude. Before law school, he studied theology at Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

Sessions: Martin Luther King, Jr.: Disciple, Protester, Political Activist

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Spiritual Life
The session will focus on his prayer life, his preaching, and his theological beliefs.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Protest Activity
This session will focus on the protests of Martin Luther King, Jr. – his leadership of the civil rights protests from the Montgomery bus boycott through the Poor People’s Campaign of 1968, and the relationship between Dr. King’s protest activities with the Southern Christian leadership Conference and the other protests in the civil rights movement.

Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Political Activism
This session will focus on the relationship between protest activities and the major civil rights legislation (the Civil Rights Act of  1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965) of the 1960s and how the understanding of political activity by key figures in the civil rights movement changed in the 1960s.


Dr. Katie Monsen

Katie_Monsen_headshot1.pngKatie Monsen is a lecturer in Environmental Studies and the Rachel Carson College at the University of California Santa Cruz, where she earned her PhD. She grew up in Spokane, Washington, attended Pacific Lutheran University, and also lived in Iowa while earning her master's degree in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. She has fallen in love with food systems and ecosystems from the Pacific Northwest to the Midwest to California's Central Coast and beyond, and loves to help others fall in love with them, too. Katie teaches courses in sustainability, freshwater ecology, agroecology, and climate change, making space for her students to get their hands dirty and their feet wet as much as possible. On the side she keeps her own hands busy by cooking, knitting, crocheting, and gardening, spending time outside with her husband and daughters, and reading.

Sessions:

Agriculture as Ecosystems: Reshaping Our View of Agriculture in the Landscape
Our modern agriculture system provides an abundance of food, but at a cost to our Earth and other people. We'll look at some of the challenges of the modern food system and how re-forming our view of agriculture as ecosystems can help shape a more sustainable way of feeding our world.

Modern Manna: Considering the Challenge of Food Waste
Food waste is a modern challenge with old roots. We will take a systems perspective to examine food waste from the farm to the table and beyond, its implications for people and the environment, and potential paths to reducing and redirecting it, both on a large scale and in our own lives.

Secrets of the Not-So-Deep: Macroinvertebrates of the Re-formed Creek
Get your feet wet as we examine Railroad Creek's renewed water quality upstream and downstream by sampling its aquatic organisms.


Claire Smith & Stacy Kitahata

Claire_Smith1.jpgClaire Smith has known and loved Holden for 28 years. A recent graduate of the Masters of Social Work program at University of Washington, Claire has been developing her group facilitation skills for 3 years. Claire got her BA in English Literature & Hispanic Studies at Pacific Lutheran University. She received her training in intercultural capacity-building through the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship and Kaleidoscope Institute Northwest. Claire served for 2 years with Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest -- 1 year in Portland, OR advocating with Latinx survivors of intimate partner violence and 1 year in St. Xavier, MT working with some of the coolest kids on the Crow Reservation.

Stacy1.jpgStacy D. Kitahata offers 25+ years of leadership with faith communities, grassroots organizations and higher education. As Program Director with the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship, she designs and conducts intercultural experiential leadership development. Previously, Kitahata served as Dean of Community at the Lutheran School of Theology, Chicago, as outreach staff with the synods of Region 1, and on the faculty of Trinity Lutheran College where she directed the Center for Community Engagement. She has degrees from UCLA and McCormick Theological Seminary.

Sessions:

Re-forming Intercultural Relationships: Through the Bible
Our current U.S. context is one of overt and covert racism, political polarization, and fear of “Other.” In this environment, how do we build supportive and equitable intercultural relationships? The first session explores the Bible to build cultural self-awareness, cultivate empathy, and develop practical dialogue skills for intercultural relationship building.

Re-forming Intercultural Relationships: Through our Stories
Our current U.S. context is one of overt and covert racism, political polarization, and fear of “Other.” In this environment, how do we build supportive and equitable intercultural relationships? The second session draws from our own stories and experiences to build cultural self-awareness, cultivate empathy, and develop practical dialogue skills for intercultural relationship building.

Re-forming Intercultural Relationships: Into the Future
Our current U.S. context is one of overt and covert racism, political polarization, and fear of “Other.” In this environment, how do we build supportive and equitable intercultural relationships? The third session builds upon our understanding of our current cultural identities and our visions for the future to build cultural self-awareness, cultivate empathy, and develop practical dialogue skills for intercultural relationship building.


Linda Jensen

Linda_Jensen1.jpgLinda first arrived in Holden as a child in August of 1951 when the Village was a mining community. Linda has volunteered with museum projects since 1999. Her goal is to help people understand the activities and folks who are part of the 100 plus years of history in this beautiful valley.

Sessions:

Miner’s Village Walk
Take a walk through the Miner’s Village with a former resident, and learn about life in the Mining days through the eyes of a child.    

Bridging Two Communities
Slide presentation showing the many parallels between the two communities of Holden Mine and Holden Village.

Holden History Early Years    
Three short DVDs with pauses for commentary: ”Forerunners,” the 1961 Work Group, ”Upbuilders,” the 1962 Work Group, “Holden in the '60s and Early ‘70s.”

June 30-July 6, 2018

Kelly Carlisle & Geoff Carlisle

Kelly_Carlisle.jpgGuest Village Musicians
Kelly Carlisle played his first worship service in the fourth grade and has been a church musician ever since. While studying music education and singing in the choral groups at Pacific Lutheran University he also performed and toured with the group 'Spiritborne' for three years. He taught choral music from 1983 to 2001 and continued his studies at Portland State University, and during that time was very active as a clinician, adjudicator, and guest conductor.


Geoff_Carlisle.jpgGeoff Carlisle was raised in Happy Valley, Oregon, and began playing viola at 11. According to his parents, he chose the instrument for its potential to earn him a college scholarship because "nobody wants to play it." He attended St. Olaf College, majoring in music and environmental studies. At St. Olaf, he enjoyed performing in 35 states, as well as Morocco and Spain. In his senior year, he was selected as the concerto competition winner for the St. Olaf Orchestra. He currently resides in Austin, Texas, where he teaches 8th grade science and plays in the Austin Civic Orchestra.

July 2-6, 2018

Kaethe Schwehn

Kaethe_Schwehn.jpgKaethe Schwehn is the author of the post-apocalyptic novel The Rending and the Nest, a collection of poems entitled Tanka & Me, and a memoir, Tailings, which details a year she spent living at Holden from 2001-2002.  Kaethe teaches at St. Olaf College and lives in Northfield with her husband and two children.

Sessions:

Reforming the Stories We Tell: Our Bodies
In this session, we’ll use Peder Jothen’s exploration of Lazarus and the hemorrhaging woman in Bible study as inspiration for writing about our own lives, specifically our charged, complex, changing relationships with our own bodies.  Attending the Bible study is not necessary but may add a Biblical layer to understanding/unpacking our own stories.  Writing is not required; listeners welcome!

Reforming the Stories We Tell: Our Vocations
In this session, we’ll use Peder Jothen’s exploration of Mary and Maccabees in Bible study as inspiration for writing about our own lives, specifically the vocations we’ve chosen and those that have chosen us.  We’ll think about who/what has called us in our lives and how (if ever) we know that our work is “good.”  Attending the Bible study is not necessary but may add a Biblical layer to understanding/unpacking our own stories.

Reforming the Stories We Tell: Our Failures
In this session, we’ll use Peder Jothen’s exploration of Eve and Judas in Bible study as inspiration for writing about our own lives, specifically considering moments of failure and brokenness.  How have we been re-formed by these occasions?  What do these moments tell us about ourselves—and about God?  Attending the Bible study is not necessary but may add a Biblical layer to understanding/unpacking our own stories.

 

Dr. Peder Jothen

PederJothen.jpgPeder Jothen teaches in the Religion Department at St. Olaf College. His intellectual interests focus on the intersections between ethics, theology, and art, particularly in the thought of Søren Kierkegaard. In short, he likes to ask questions about how creating and interpreting art relates to being called by God to work for justice in the world. His hope is to help us all see our lives as works of art, in which living justly is itself then a type of artistic creativity. His first book, "Kierkegaard, Selfhood, and Aesthetics: The Art of Subjectivity" was published in 2014. He is married to Kaethe Schwehn, a creative writer who teaches in the English Department at St. Olaf, and has two delightful small children.

Sessions:

Radical Acts of Biblical Reformation: Bodies
Using the story of the raising of Lazarus (John 11:28-44), in this session, we will explore the tensions between belief/doubt, hope/despair, and the physical body /spiritual life. This story asks us to reflect on the liminal spaces that we inhabit in our lives as material yet soulful beings. Pointedly, it reveals that the Christian life includes but extends beyond the physical, while at the same time offering us the chance to rightly live in our material bodies amidst the brokenness of the world. In conjunction with this session, Kaethe Schwehn will offer a chance for villagers to reflect on the connections between this story and their lives through creative writing exercises.

Radical Acts of Biblical Reformation: Vocation  
This session examines two different accounts of vocation, one focused on Mary (Luke 1:26-38) and the other from 2 Maccabees 7. In Luke, Mary (reluctantly at first) accepts God’s call to bear Christ. In the process, she exemplifies a form of faithful servanthood, particularly in relation to the joys/pains of motherhood. In Maccabees, a text that influenced the early Christian movement, seven brothers are tortured and martyred, refusing to deny their faith in God. Here, the vocation of discipleship leads to death. By comparing the two texts, the session will reflect on how God’s call is not one that implies an easy, comfortable life, but calls us  to see and bear the pain of the world as we work to end injustice. Following the session, Kaethe Schwehn will offer a chance for villagers to reflect on the connections between these stories and their lives through creative writing exercises.

Radical Acts of Biblical Reformation: Failure
This session asks us to think about how God intertwines grace-filled forgiveness with our failures. In short, are there failures that are unforgivable? How do we find hope amidst the never-ending experience of failure? We will look at two biblical stories, that of Adam/Eve and Judas (MT 26:14-16, 27:3-10). Doing so, we will be challenged to reflect on the depth of God’s forgiveness amidst these epic failures. We will explore how these stories call us to forgive those who hurt us, our communities, and our world, all modeled on God’s actions in Christ. As a follow-up session, Kaethe Schwehn will offer a chance for villagers to reflect on the connections between these stories and their lives through creative writing exercises.


Senator John Marty

John_Marty_2016.jpgJohn is a Minnesota state senator and a strong advocate for government ethics, social and economic justice, and environmental stewardship of the planet. John works for public policies that serve the entire community, especially the homeless, those without healthcare and other vulnerable people. His focus is on prevention, addressing challenges up front, to build a better future and prevent problems before they start.  
Senator Marty co-chaired a Legislative Commission on Ending Poverty. He is the author of Healing Health Care, a book spelling out a path to replace our dysfunctional health insurance system with health care for all, saving money while improving health. John and his wife Connie have a long-term connection to Holden. He is a graduate of St. Olaf College with a B.A. in Ethics, and they live in Roseville.

Sessions:

Fulfilling Martin Luther King’s Vision in a Donald Trump World -- What Kind of Future Do We Want?  
Fifty years ago, Martin Luther King articulated a vision of a healthy society that treats all people with dignity, that promotes understanding and peace instead of fear and division, and that preserves the planet for posterity. In these divisive times where appeals to fear and greed dominate our political system, how do we create the society that Dr. King envisioned?

Baking the Planet
Scientists warn that survival of the human race is threatened by overheating of the planet, yet actions to reduce human-generated greenhouse gas emissions are “controversial” in American politics. We must change our political and economic systems to address climate change before it is too late.

Why Don’t we have a U.S. Department of Peace?
Whether it is a “Cold War,” a “War on Terror,” or some other threat, our national response is to build up the military-industrial complex, and our “aid” to other countries is often selling them more sophisticated military equipment. World tensions are increasing and we are one tragic misstep from nuclear war. Is it possible that every time our bombs kill one terrorist, that the violence is creating two new ones?
Unfortunately, the idea of promoting peace and understanding through humanitarian and development assistance and through diplomacy doesn’t even receive lip-service from politicians. Might we be safer with a different approach? A look at the politics of war and peace, and the need for a new approach to security and world peace.

Abusing Science for Economic & Political Gain
The push to ignore science or to distort facts or scientific research for political and economic gain, has warped the political process and endangers both health and the environment. A look at the interaction between science and politics and the impact of uncertainty and income information.


Jason DeRose

Jason_DeRose_Sepia.jpgJason DeRose loves audio storytelling. He began listening to public radio as a young child in the back seat of his parents’ car and began making radio himself in high school. He went to St. Olaf College and the University of Chicago Divinity School. Now, he’s the Western Bureau Chief and Senior Editor for Religion and LGBTQ Issues at NPR News, where he’s worked for more than a decade. He’s a member of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, where he chairs the congregation’s Seminary Internship Committee. He likes doing yoga, lifting weights, cooking dinner, and reading novels. He lives in Santa Monica with his husband Willis and their dog  Ajax. They grow Meyer lemons on the balcony.

Session: Unearned Intimacies: on the Ethics of Telling Other People's Stories
Participants will listen together to audio documentaries and discuss the ethics of creating journalism. DeRose will explain a bit about the production techniques used to created them. Participants will discuss the pieces together. And the group will decide together if a piece tells another person’s story well or badly.


Dr. Diane Jacobson

Diane Jacobson is professor emerita of Old Testament at Luther Seminary in Saint Paul, MN where she taught from 1982-2010. She also served as director of the Book of Faith Initiative for the ELCA from 2008-2016. She is a rostered deacon of the ELCA. Jacobson has been a frequent speaker throughout the Church, including church-wide assemblies, the LWF Assembly in Hong Kong, and numerous national, synodical, and congregational assemblies. Jacobson’s main academic areas of teaching have been in Wisdom and Psalms. She was a principle translator of the psalms for the ELW. Jacobson’s recent publications include: “Igniting Biblical Imagination in Our Congregations,” “Family in the Book of Ruth,” and “Job as a Theologian of the Cross,” (Word and World 2011, 2013, 2014) as well as the Book of Faith Lenten Devotional, Water Marks, and the Book of Faith study on Ruth (co-authored with David Vasquez). Jacobson currently serves on the boards of Augsburg College and Minnesota Opera. Jacobson is, first and foremost, a lover of Scripture. "I'm in love with this Book," she says. "My calling is to teach Scripture for the sake of God’s world, and to invite others into the wonders and rewards of exploring the Bible together."

Session: To Till and To Keep: Our Calling to Be Stewards of God's Creation
Together we will explore ten different ways that Scripture speaks of creation with special emphasis on the implied human role in each portrait.  We will look at Genesis, Psalms, Job, some law, some prophets, Proverbs, and a bit of Paul, John, and Revelation.


Dr. James Flaten

Flaten_photo_March_2018.jpgJames Flaten, Ph.D., serves as the Associate Director of NASA’s Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, a higher education program to promote interest in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) from a NASA/aerospace perspective. Housed in the Aerospace Engineering Department at the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities (although his academic background is actually experimental physics), he helps coordinate NASA-themed activities around the state, through faculty contacts at multiple colleges and universities. At UMN he particularly likes to work with freshmen on aerospace-build projects, including stratospheric spacecraft (flown on weather balloons), high-power rockets (the step above model rockets), quadcopters (drones), and cubesats (pico-satellites). During the summer of 2017 he led a stratospheric ballooning undergraduate student team from the U of MN to capture video footage of the total solar eclipse from the stratosphere in the path of totality in Nebraska. He is also interested in astronomy, physics (especially connections to music and art), and likes outdoor activities like hiking and camping. James grew up on the mission field in west Africa, son of Lutheran missionaries. He is a member of University Lutheran Church of Hope in Minneapolis where he sings in the choir.

Sessions:
Astronomy: What We See and What We Don’t See
This session will consist of two 1-hour parts, beginning with “The Visible Universe in 60 Minutes or Less.” which focuses on stunning images of astronomical objects and what they teach us about the universe. This will be followed by a completely separate presentation entitled “Why doesn’t it ever look that way when I look up at the night sky? (How astronomical images are made.)” which talks about the use of telescopes, cameras, and spacecraft to make such images.

A Different Perspective on the Total Solar Eclipse of August 2017
NASA’s Space Grant Consortia from around the country used the solar eclipse of August 2017 as an opportunity to engage teams of college (and some pre-college) students in building hardware to document the event. The MN Space Grant sent a stratospheric ballooning team to eastern Nebraska to fly video cameras on weather balloons to film the passage of the shadow of totality from the stratosphere, high above any clouds. This presentation will describe our hardware-development, discuss our “eclipse expedition,” and show the striking video footage we collected from the stratospheric perspective.

The Physics of Sound and Musical Instruments
This session will be a science demonstration show illustrating how physics lab equipment can be used to better understand sound production and perception. There will be an emphasis on visualization of various aspects of sound, to complement listening to sound. The session will also talk about the ways in which a wide variety of musical instruments generate sound physically and how physics instrumentation allows one to analyze the sound and possibly even “improve upon” (or invent new) musical instruments.


Paul Jacobson

Paul__Baobab.JPGPaul Jacobson, baroque flutist, church musician, instrument maker, and composer, is co-founder of and flutist with The Lyra Baroque Orchestra and The WolfGang ensemble of Minnesota. He studied music, philosophy, and religion at St. Olaf College, at Union Theological Seminary School of Sacred Music in New York, at New College, University of Edinburgh, and at Columbia University School of the Arts. He has performed with many orchestras and ensembles throughout the United States and abroad and has served on the board of the National Flute Association, Early Music America (as vice-president), Lutheran Arts, and the Executive Council of the New York Metropolitan Synod of the LCA. Presently, Paul serves on the boards of Luther Seminary and the Lutheran Social Services of Minnesota Foundation. He is active nowadays as a baroque and classical flutist and as a composer of hymns, cantatas, and such. Paul and his wife Diane (Professor Emerita of Old Testament at Luther Seminary and retired national director of the ELCA’s Book of Faith Initiative) live with their dog Zipporah (“Zippy”) in St. Paul and on a lake in the Superior National Forest. They have three sons and four grandsons.

Session: A Millennium of Hymnody
Paul will present an overview, century by century, of hymnody leading up to the German Reformation and Lutheran hymnody in the five centuries following. We will look at hymnody not only of different eras, but of different Lutheran cultures and pieties. Participants may work on their own hymn text or tune during the course of the sessions.

July 7-13, 2018

Hallie Parkins

Parkins_Hallie.jpgCellist Hallie Parkins is an avid performer, collaborator, and advocate for social justice. In 2014, she completed her undergraduate studies at Oberlin Conservatory, where she studied with Darrett Adkins. She also completed a Bachelors of Arts at Oberlin College, studying feminist and womanist religion. She grew up studying with Richard Treat at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. As an orchestral musician, Hallie has performed in concerts with the Berkeley Symphony, Oberlin Orchestra, and Oberlin Chamber Orchestra. She also plays with chamber groups around the bay area. Hallie is currently in her third year of seminary at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. She has played in worship settings at St. Gregory’s Cathedral, University Lutheran Chapel and in interfaith services. After completing her undergraduate studies, Hallie spent a summer in Ghost Ranch on college staff where she performed weekly concerts on the trail to Chimney Rock.

July 9-13, 2018

Kaethe Schwehn

Kaethe_Schwehn.jpgKaethe Schwehn is the author of the post-apocalyptic novel The Rending and the Nest, a collection of poems entitled Tanka & Me, and a memoir, Tailings, which details a year she spent living at Holden from 2001-2002.  Kaethe teaches at St. Olaf College and lives in Northfield with her husband and two children.

Sessions:

Reforming the Stories We Tell: Our Bodies
In this session, we’ll use Peder Jothen’s exploration of Lazarus and the hemorrhaging woman in Bible study as inspiration for writing about our own lives, specifically our charged, complex, changing relationships with our own bodies.  Attending the Bible study is not necessary but may add a Biblical layer to understanding/unpacking our own stories.  Writing is not required; listeners welcome!

Reforming the Stories We Tell: Our Vocations
In this session, we’ll use Peder Jothen’s exploration of Mary and Maccabees in Bible study as inspiration for writing about our own lives, specifically the vocations we’ve chosen and those that have chosen us.  We’ll think about who/what has called us in our lives and how (if ever) we know that our work is “good.”  Attending the Bible study is not necessary but may add a Biblical layer to understanding/unpacking our own stories.

Reforming the Stories We Tell: Our Failures
In this session, we’ll use Peder Jothen’s exploration of Eve and Judas in Bible study as inspiration for writing about our own lives, specifically considering moments of failure and brokenness.  How have we been re-formed by these occasions?  What do these moments tell us about ourselves—and about God?  Attending the Bible study is not necessary but may add a Biblical layer to understanding/unpacking our own stories.


Dr. Peder Jothen

PederJothen.jpgPeder Jothen teaches in the Religion Department at St. Olaf College. His intellectual interests focus on the intersections between ethics, theology, and art, particularly in the thought of Søren Kierkegaard. In short, he likes to ask questions about how creating and interpreting art relates to being called by God to work for justice in the world. His hope is to help us all see our lives as works of art, in which living justly is itself then a type of artistic creativity. His first book, "Kierkegaard, Selfhood, and Aesthetics: The Art of Subjectivity" was published in 2014. He is married to Kaethe Schwehn, a creative writer who teaches in the English Department at St. Olaf, and has two delightful small children.

Sessions:

Radical Acts of Biblical Reformation: Bodies
Using the story of the raising of Lazarus (John 11:28-44), in this session, we will explore the tensions between belief/doubt, hope/despair, and the physical body /spiritual life. This story asks us to reflect on the liminal spaces that we inhabit in our lives as material yet soulful beings. Pointedly, it reveals that the Christian life includes but extends beyond the physical, while at the same time offering us the chance to rightly live in our material bodies amidst the brokenness of the world. In conjunction with this session, Kaethe Schwehn will offer a chance for villagers to reflect on the connections between this story and their lives through creative writing exercises.

Radical Acts of Biblical Reformation: Vocation  
This session examines two different accounts of vocation, one focused on Mary (Luke 1:26-38) and the other from 2 Maccabees 7. In Luke, Mary (reluctantly at first) accepts God’s call to bear Christ. In the process, she exemplifies a form of faithful servanthood, particularly in relation to the joys/pains of motherhood. In Maccabees, a text that influenced the early Christian movement, seven brothers are tortured and martyred, refusing to deny their faith in God. Here, the vocation of discipleship leads to death. By comparing the two texts, the session will reflect on how God’s call is not one that implies an easy, comfortable life, but calls us  to see and bear the pain of the world as we work to end injustice. Following the session, Kaethe Schwehn will offer a chance for villagers to reflect on the connections between these stories and their lives through creative writing exercises.

Radical Acts of Biblical Reformation: Failure
This session asks us to think about how God intertwines grace-filled forgiveness with our failures. In short, are there failures that are unforgivable? How do we find hope amidst the never-ending experience of failure? We will look at two biblical stories, that of Adam/Eve and Judas (MT 26:14-16, 27:3-10). Doing so, we will be challenged to reflect on the depth of God’s forgiveness amidst these epic failures. We will explore how these stories call us to forgive those who hurt us, our communities, and our world, all modeled on God’s actions in Christ. As a follow-up session, Kaethe Schwehn will offer a chance for villagers to reflect on the connections between these stories and their lives through creative writing exercises.


Senator John Marty

John_Marty_2016.jpgJohn is a Minnesota state senator and a strong advocate for government ethics, social and economic justice, and environmental stewardship of the planet. John works for public policies that serve the entire community, especially the homeless, those without healthcare and other vulnerable people. His focus is on prevention, addressing challenges up front, to build a better future and prevent problems before they start. Senator Marty co-chaired a Legislative Commission on Ending Poverty. He is the author of Healing Health Care, a book spelling out a path to replace our dysfunctional health insurance system with health care for all, saving money while improving health. John and his wife Connie have a long-term connection to Holden. He is a graduate of St. Olaf College with a B.A. in Ethics, and they live in Roseville.

Sessions:

Faith & Politics
How does our religious faith affect our political involvement?  How should it?  Those with strong religious faith or deeply held values feel an obligation to live them out in all their actions. Citizens in a democracy have a responsibility to participate in governance; we are the government. We have obligations to both our values and our government and need to take relationships between them seriously.  

Poverty in a land of plenty – The Politics of Wealth & Poverty
Many working Americans live in cars and homeless shelters. Why can’t workers afford basic necessities? This session will look at economic disparities and the inability of many hard-working people to earn enough income to pay their bills.  

Healing Health Care
Every other industrialized nation provides health care to all their people, yet in the United States we have over 28,000,000 people who have no health coverage, and many who have coverage but still cannot afford care. Unfortunately, as dysfunctional as our system for accessing healthcare is, the federal government is in the process of taking away coverage from millions of additional people.  Why are we moving backwards on health care?  A look at the politics of health care and an alternative approach that would cover everyone for all their medical needs, while saving money.


Jason DeRose

Jason_DeRose_Sepia.jpgJason DeRose loves audio storytelling. He began listening to public radio as a young child in the back seat of his parents’ car and began making radio himself in high school. He went to St. Olaf College and the University of Chicago Divinity School. Now, he’s the Western Bureau Chief and Senior Editor for Religion and LGBTQ Issues at NPR News, where he’s worked for more than a decade. He’s a member of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, where he chairs the congregation’s Seminary Internship Committee. He likes doing yoga, lifting weights, cooking dinner, and reading novels. He lives in Santa Monica with his husband Willis and their dog  Ajax. They grow Meyer lemons on the balcony.

Session: Unearned Intimacies: on the Ethics of Telling Other People's Stories
Participants will listen together to audio documentaries and discuss the ethics of creating journalism. DeRose will explain a bit about the production techniques used to created them. Participants will discuss the pieces together. And the group will decide together if a piece tells another person’s story well or badly.


Rev. Dr. Elizabeth Palmer

Elizabeth_Palmer.pngElizabeth Palmer is a pastor, theologian, and writer who currently serves as the Books Editor at the Christian Century magazine. Her book (Faith in a Hidden God: Luther, Kierkegaard, and the Binding of Isaac) was published in 2017 by Fortress Press. Before her call to the Christian Century, Elizabeth served as Lutheran Campus Pastor at the University of Chicago and as a hospital chaplain. She has a Ph.D. in theology from the University of Chicago Divinity School and has also studied at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. She’s better at preaching law than gospel; better at asking difficult questions of Scripture than giving definitive answers; better at finding comfort in uncertainty than relying on certainty. But that’s only because a deep, abiding sense of God’s unfailing grace underlies everything she says and does. Elizabeth lives in Skokie, Illinois, with her husband Liam and their daughters Anna and Miriam. She recalls with fondness that during her last trip to Holden Village (in January of 1997), her unsuccessful attempts to stoke the fire one morning were met with nothing but shivering generosity and helpfulness.

Session: Trusting a Difficult God
We’ll immerse ourselves each morning in a biblical story that makes God seem impossibly difficult—including Genesis 22, Job, and the Jesus who calls us to hate our families. Through song and exegesis and writing and discussion, we’ll work honestly through these stories, discerning together what it might mean for our own lives to trust in a God who sometimes seems horrible, hidden, or simply untrustworthy.


Rev. Dr. Asa Lee

Lee_Asa.jpgRev. Dr. Lee currently serves as Associate Dean for Community Life and Director of African American Church Studies at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. He has spent twenty years in congregational life as a worship leader, Christian educator, and pastoral leader. He works with churches, and denominational leaders on matters of Christian formation, leadership education and faithful diversity outreach. He earned the Doctor of Ministry degree in Educational Leadership at Virginia Theological Seminary after having earned his Master of Divinity degree cum Laude from Wesley Theological Seminary. He completed his Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education, Magna cum Laude from Hampton University.

Session: Reawakening Prophetic and Imaginative Spirituality
For many, the older we get the less we are taught or cultivated to appreciate our imagination. By exploring imagination as a source of divine revelation, this workshop aims to reawaken practices that stimulate and expand the imagination. The ultimate aim is to awaken within participants the prophetic vision that calls us to greater awareness and practice in the world. Session 1 will cover Spiritual Practice. Session 2 will cover Leadership Practices. Session 3 will cover Community Practice and Implications.


Dr. Steve Holland

Holland_Picture.jpgSteve Holland is an Associate Professor of Economics at Luther College where he teaches a wide range of courses at the intersection of economics and public policy, including Law & Economics, Environmental Economics, Development Economics, and J-Term courses in faraway places such as Vietnam and Holden Village.  His research often examines how people join together to solve the problems left unsolved by economic and legal institutions, and he has a special interest in the economics of the food system. Steve has a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, a law degree from Georgetown University, and a bachelor’s degree from St. Olaf College.

Sessions:

Morality and Economic Life
One of the great questions of the last century has been whether market economies help or hinder our quest for a better life. Discussion of this question will be grounded in current events and participants will be encouraged to reflect on ways we might eventually reform our economic lives.

Markets and Inequality
Can we distribute the fruits of an economy in a fairer way?

Markets and the Environment
Can societies resolve the tension between increasing economic activity and the Earth’s limits?

Markets and Community
How do markets affect the quality of relationships between people?

 


Jannele Mastin

Jannele_Mastin_photo.jpgExploring the intersection of worship and immersive creative experience, Jannele Mastin has been creating large scale artwork to illuminate teaching, worship and provoke deeper thought into God’s ways for over 20 years. Jannele has worked as a Senior Art Director for print, digital media and 3-D product in Kansas City while coordinating visual art opportunities and creating mixed media work for Jacob’s Well Church and other venues.

Session: From Fear to Courage: A Visual Expression
Workshop participants will consider the Holden Village summer conversation "Fear Not" as the inspiration or a collaboratively created art installation for the evening vespers worship space. Participants will engage with scriptural and other texts as well as their own experiences to visually express emotions, beliefs, and questions concerning fear re-formed into courage.


John Thompson

John_Thompson.jpgJohn has a fine arts degree from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He started carving in 1990, making a carousel in Missoula, Montana. He is now a printmaker that spends most of his time carving wood and some stone carving. He has been teaching printmaking workshops since 1980, and carving workshops since the early 2000s. You can see some of his work at www.hobbyhorsearts.com.

Session: Beginning Relief Carving
This session will focus on safety, learning a bit about the wood, designing what the participants want to carve, fine tuning designs, carving tips, how to sharpen tools and the types of tools one might want to buy, and how to finish a carving-sanding.

July 14-20, 2018

Rolf Vegdahl

Rolf_Vegdahl.pngGuest Village Musician
Rolf is a church musician at the Lake Chelan Lutheran Church.  He also composes and arranges sacred and secular music; teaches guitar, piano, ukulele and voice; and performs.

July 16-20, 2018

Rev. Dr. Cynthia Lindner

Lindner_11.jpgRev. Dr. Cynthia Lindner comes from a Midwestern family with a crazy-quilted immigrant background (her grandfather was a Palestinian immigrant; her grandmother was from Italy.) Despite the homogeneity of her 1950s small town, she was deeply shaped by her grandparents’ diverse cultures—their plural languages, Mediterranean music and foods, and their spiritual and religious sensibilities. This textured upbringing funded her abiding delight in ambiguity and multiplicity: she studied theology and psychology; attended a college of the church (St. Olaf College) and a “secular” research university (the University of Chicago); was ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and trained as a psychotherapist; and was a pastor in small town Oregon for 16 years while serving as a hospice chaplain and a pastoral psychotherapist. She returned to the Divinity School at Chicago in 2002 to direct its ministry program, which opened its doors to students from a wide variety of faith traditions a few years later. She currently teaches worship practices, spiritual care and counseling, and community leadership to students who come from many different Christian denominations, as well as Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucian traditions. Lindner’s research is fueled by her long-standing interest in the complicated ways that human beings “tell themselves” how our various communities shape us through story and embodied practices, and how, in our current climate or rapid change, these communities can learn to honor and embrace difference.

Session: Multiplicity, Multiple-mindness
If you have ever carried on a conversation between “you” and “yourself,” or had that sensation of being “beside yourself,” then you already know what feminist philosophers, postmodern theologians, and social psychologists have also observed:  each of us is a composite of many “selves,”  and therefore, we can inhabit multiple understandings, perspectives, and roles, all at once. Our multiplicity is often neglected or misunderstood because of our culture’s insistence on consistency and coherence, but an awareness and engagement of our multiple-mindedness is essential for fueling lives of creativity, compassion, courage, and spiritual vitality.

 

Dr. Jeff Kerssen-Griep

Jeff_Kerssen-Griep.jpegJeff Kerssen-Griep is a Professor of Communication at the University of Portland, where he especially enjoys teaching Intercultural, Interpersonal, and Barrier-crossing communication courses. His research and workshops help teachers and other group leaders see and shape the skilled interactions that drive engaged, diverse learning/work environments. He also backs contra dance fiddlers on guitar in the PNW bands Joyride and Wild Hair. He lives in Vancouver, WA.


Sessions:

Communicating Across Barriers: Learning to See and Avoid T.U.I. ("Thinking Under the Influence") in Connecting with Others
Learn to recognize and avoid T.U.I. ("Thinking Under the Influence") of unhelpful dominant assumptions that hinder people's ability to connect and interact with people unlike themselves.

Communicating Across Barriers: Navigating Unexpected Differences with Unfamiliar Others
Normalize your own responses to novel cultural situations and learn to recognize and navigate unexpected communication differences across cultural and societal boundaries. Dr.

Communicating Across Barriers: Interpersonal Skills for Intercultural Interactions and Relationships
Learn interpersonal knowledge, attitudes, and skills that help create authentic and more comfortable connections across common societal boundaries such as race, ability, sexuality, social class, and gender identities.

Please click here to email Jeff about resources from these sessions.


Dr. Marc Marenco

Marc_Marenco.jpgDr. Marc Marenco is a member of the philosophy department at Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon. He teaches courses in bioethics as well as philosophy of religion, science and religion, and First Year Seminar. He took his first graduate degree from Yale Divinity School in 1983 (M.Div.) followed by a degree in philosophy from Oxford in 1992. (D.Phil.) With a colleague in biology (Lisa Sardinia) he was awarded a $257,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to work for two years with twenty-one religious communities in the greater Portland area in Oregon. The program was adapted for use by the Canadian Council of Churches. Marenco lives in Forest Grove with his wife, Ale, and their son, Paul. His wife is a molecular biologist. His son... is not. He is a fanatical longboard enthusiast and discovered in addition to dubstep he digs Chopin and Beethoven (alright... and Scott Joplin). Marenco also has a daughter, Dascha, who will graduate from Pacific University this year in International Business. Marenco looks forward to hosting an exchange student from Costa Rica soon.

Sessions:

Preimplantation Genetic Testing and the Control of Reproductive Outcomes
In this session Dr. Marc Marenco will first talk about the science and technology behind the practice of doing genetic tests on embryos. Then he discusses the many ethical, legal, and even theological implications of deciding which genetically profiled embryos to implant and which ones to discard. We will then do small group work to reflect together on a case study (or two, depending on time) to derive as much insight as we can into the meaning of his practice for our understanding of human reproduction.  

Abortion Based on a Genetic Test
The abortion debate has traditionally revolved around the question of whether it is morally defensible for a woman to terminate her pregnancy as part of a decision to reproduce or not reproduce. The debate pitted the rights of a woman to control her own body on the one hand and assertion of a right of the unborn to a future. With the rise of genetic technologies, most notably hundreds of detailed genetic tests, the assertion of woman that she does not want a baby is replaced by an assertion that she does not want THIS baby, or THAT baby, but perhaps this one here... Selective abortions based on a genetic test is a different subject than the question of abortion in general. In this session, we will think through some of the implications of prenatal testing for the disability community as well as more abstract implications for the changing concept of "being a parent."

Cloning
In 1996 Ian Wilmut managed to do what many scientists believed was not possible at the time, clone a mammal using the DNA from a somatic cell taken from an adult sheep. In 2004, Marenco met with Ian Wilmut in his laboratory outside Edinburgh and talked with him about his work, as he was preparing to apply for a license to clone human embryos for the purpose of studying motor neuron disease. This session is about the science of cloning and the ethical, legal, and social implications of that science in reproduction and medical therapies.

 

Professor Rebecca Wee

Rebecca_Wee.jpegProfessor Rebecca Wee has taught poetry, creative nonfiction, composition, and literature courses at Augustana College in Rock Island, IL since 1994. Wee has been a published poet since 2001 and a mother since 2003. In 2015 she married to Bradley Levinson, a professor of education and anthropology, and she hails from a family of teachers, Lutheran pastors, poets, ranchers, and politicians.

Sessions:

Marigolds in the Breakfast Eggs: Finding the strange in the ordinary, or Paying Attention
A poetry writing workshop, focused on paying attention to details that make the ordinary extraordinary.

Your Dear Lips: Poems of love and praise
A poetry writing workshop, focused on affection, devotion, passion and praise.

The Most Dangerous Thing: Poems that say what we think we shouldn’t
A poetry writing workshop, focused on the truth of our shadows and on saying the unsayable


David Westerlund

headshot_David_Westerlund.jpgDavid approaches life and the world with a growing curiosity, wonder, and a posture of “yes.” He savors Ignatian and Jesuit spirituality and longs to enter the Story more each day, sensing the deep, present, joyful Love of Jesus, who calls us Beloved. David serves as the Director of Development at Tierra Nueva – a non-profit ministry that comes alongside incarcerated and immigrant people in the Skagit Valley of Washington State. In 2011 he began taking improv classes from the Upfront Theatre in Bellingham, where he resides. Last year he received a Pastoral Study Project grant from the Louisville Institute to explore the impact of improv with those on the margins and those in the mainstream church. He’s been delighted to discover that the more he explores this world of improv, the larger it becomes. Visit BePresentDiscoverJoy.com for more information.

Sessions:

Reincorporating: Embodiment and Emotion in Improv
In our technologically-saturated and sped-up world, we often can lose touch with our embodiment. Often in churches, faith becomes a cognitive exercise. In improv we re-enter our bodies (re-incorporate) and experience our own embodiment and that of others, in fresh ways.
At the same time, to those of us who have endured trauma, our bodies can be a place of physical/emotional/spiritual pain. Improv is a non-verbal intervention that helps us re-engage with our bodies in a new way.

Stepping into the Story that’s Unfolding: Storytelling Improv
Stories are what captures our hearts and imaginations. We are continually telling stories to ourselves about our world and ourselves.

Reincorporating: Improv as a Tool for Mutual Transformation with the Margins and the Mainstream
In this session David will share his own stories about doing improv with those on the margins and in the mainstream church. In addition, David will share about innovative programs around the country where improv is being done in prisons, with traumatized youth, with kids with special needs, and with older adults with early stage memory loss.


Richard Goerling

Goerling_Richard.jpgRichard has served in law enforcement for over two decades. He’s held both federal and municipal level positions in a variety of investigative and operational assignments. Richard has spearheaded the introduction of mindfulness into policing as part of a larger cultural transformation toward a compassionate, skillful and resilient warrior ethos. He is a thought leader in resiliency, performance, leading change and community building in policing. Richard served in the United States Coast Guard Reserve for 27 years, both active and reserve, retiring in 2015 at the rank of Commander while assigned to Coast Guard Sector Charleston, SC.  His early active-duty tours included serving as an officer aboard a high endurance cutter, and as an instructor at the Coast Guard’s maritime law enforcement academy. He serves as an affiliate assistant professor in the Graduate School of Psychology at Pacific University in Oregon and serves as a co-investigator in a current NIH funded study looking at mindfulness in policing. Richard completed a year-long training program at the University of California at Los Angeles, Mindful Awareness Research Center (MARC) under the direction of Diana Winston, Dr. Susan Smalley, and Dr. Marvin Belzer. He is a Certified Mindfulness Facilitator through UCLA.

Session:

Mindfulness in Policing- Leading Change, Healing Suffering & Building Community
Exploring the role of our faith-based community in police reform, this series looks at the science and mystery of the contemplative practice of mindfulness. Session one explores the science behind mindfulness meditation its potential for aiding our personal, social and professional development. Session two looks at how mindfulness is being integrated into policing in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Australia. Session three joins participants to vision over-the-horizon with a peek at emerging efforts and with group engagement to explore how our faith-based communities can play a leadership role in criminal justice reform. Each session includes guided mindfulness practice.


Professor Ben Stewart & Dr. Elizabeth Stewart

Stewart_Ben.jpgA former Holden Village pastor, Benjamin Stewart is Gordon A. Braatz Associate Professor of Worship and Director of Advanced Studies at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, where he has taught since 2009. Ben’s graduate work (Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia, STM; Emory University, PhD) focused on how ritual shapes people’s environmental spirituality. Ben is author of A Watered Garden: Christian Worship and Earth’s Ecology (2011), and a contributing author to Eco-Reformation: Grace and Hope for a Planet in Peril (2016). He is a member of the North American Academy of Liturgy and serves as convener of its Ecology and Liturgy Seminar. Ben and his wife Beth live in metro Chicago, near Bemis Woods and the Salt Creek, and are parents of two sons, Justin, in high school, and Forrest, in college. Ben loves hiking and backpacking in the North Cascades around Holden and would love to hear stories from your hikes!

head_shotStewart_Elizabeth_05.jpgBeth is currently Unit Director of the Skilled Care Center and Rehab Unit at Rush Oak Park Hospital in suburban Chicago. She recently earned her Doctorate in Public Health Nursing from Rush University, focusing on how people and populations successfully make changes to to increase health. Her primary research explored the relationship between health promotion and sobriety in women with substance abuse issues. In her spare time she enjoys quilting, knitting, drinking tea, reading with her cat, and trying to keep up with her husband Ben and their two boys Forrest and Justin while hiking.

Session: This Changes Everything: How Change Theory Can Help You Re-form the Health of Your Body, Your Spirit, and the World Around You.
Many of us want to make changes in our lives, communities, and world, but of course we find that change is difficult. However, research is teaching us how to make it easier to accomplish change -- and how we can make our changes matter and “stick.” Over these three sessions, you will learn how to apply change theory to your own life, especially in the areas of personal health, spiritual practices, and ecological health.


John Thompson

John_Thompson.jpgJohn has a fine arts degree from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He started carving in 1990, making a carousel in Missoula, Montana. He is now a printmaker that spends most of his time carving wood and some stone carving. He has been teaching printmaking workshops since 1980, and carving workshops since the early 2000s. You can see some of his work at www.hobbyhorsearts.com.

Session: Beginning Relief Carving
This session will focus on safety, learning a bit about the wood, designing what the participants want to carve, fine tuning designs, carving tips, how to sharpen tools and the types of tools one might want to buy, and how to finish a carving-sanding.

July 22-27, 2018

Cooper Sherry

cooper_sherry_pic-1.jpgGuest Village Musician
Cooper Sherry got his start on the organ bench, watching with his 7-year-old-eyes as the pastor’s wife played Bach after each service. From there he was hooked, studying organ and choral conducting in college, teaching middle school choir classes in the years to follow, and always keeping a church job so he could do what he loves most. In recent years, he has become a full-time church musician, heavily influenced by the global music of Bread for the Journey and by his wife Sarah, with whom he has begun to write hymns. Yet – he still likes to play a good Bach fugue for the postlude, ideally following a global sending hymn! He currently directs two adult choirs, one youth choir, and three children’s choirs at his church, along with planning and playing two weekly worship services – one which is traditional with organ liturgy, and one which is blended with global music, jazz, and progressive hymns. Sherry and his wife have written over 20 hymns together, and enjoy leading people in song and worship.

July 23-27, 2018

Rev. Dr. Cynthia Lindner

Lindner_11.jpgRev. Dr. Cynthia Lindner comes from a Midwestern family with a crazy-quilted immigrant background (her grandfather was a Palestinian immigrant; her grandmother was from Italy.) Despite the homogeneity of her 1950s small town, she was deeply shaped by her grandparents’ diverse cultures—their plural languages, Mediterranean music and foods, and their spiritual and religious sensibilities. This textured upbringing funded her abiding delight in ambiguity and multiplicity: she studied theology and psychology; attended a college of the church (St. Olaf College) and a “secular” research university (the University of Chicago); was ordained in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) and trained as a psychotherapist; and was a pastor in small town Oregon for 16 years while serving as a hospice chaplain and a pastoral psychotherapist. She returned to the Divinity School at Chicago in 2002 to direct its ministry program, which opened its doors to students from a wide variety of faith traditions a few years later. She currently teaches worship practices, spiritual care and counseling, and community leadership to students who come from many different Christian denominations, as well as Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Confucian traditions. Lindner’s research is fueled by her long-standing interest in the complicated ways that human beings “tell themselves” how our various communities shape us through story and embodied practices, and how, in our current climate or rapid change, these communities can learn to honor and embrace difference.

Session: Multiplicity, Multiple-mindness
If you have ever carried on a conversation between “you” and “yourself,” or had that sensation of being “beside yourself,” then you already know what feminist philosophers, postmodern theologians, and social psychologists have also observed:  each of us is a composite of many “selves,”  and therefore, we can inhabit multiple understandings, perspectives, and roles, all at once. Our multiplicity is often neglected or misunderstood because of our culture’s insistence on consistency and coherence, but an awareness and engagement of our multiple-mindedness is essential for fueling lives of creativity, compassion, courage, and spiritual vitality.


Dr. Jeff Kerssen-Griep

Jeff_Kerssen-Griep.jpegJeff Kerssen-Griep is a Professor of Communication at the University of Portland, where he especially enjoys teaching Intercultural, Interpersonal, and Barrier-crossing communication courses. His research and workshops help teachers and other group leaders see and shape the skilled interactions that drive engaged, diverse learning/work environments. He also backs contra dance fiddlers on guitar in the PNW bands Joyride and Wild Hair. He lives in Vancouver, WA.


Sessions:

"Checking my privilege?" Experiencing what that means
Experience privilege from more than one perspective, including feelings, thoughts, and ideas associated with those experiences.

"Checking my privilege?" How does that change my cross-cultural connections?
Experience first-hand real people's interpersonal engagements over time amidst divided political and religious narratives, identities, and labels.

Should "checking my privilege" lead me to focus on white supremacy, racial reconciliation, or something else?
Consider the merits of some common (and not-so-common) responses to "checking my privilege" and recognizing it - or its lack.  Guided by expert voices, comprehend a menu of common plausible responses to recognizing one's institutionalized societal privileges, or lack thereof.

Please click here to email Jeff about resources from these sessions.


Rev. Dr. Gary Mason

Mason_Gary.jpgRev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organisation based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co existence and shared space, it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianisation efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognised by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster. Gary is a Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is a Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peacebuilding, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation.

Session: Fear Not – Struggles and Suffering
Isaiah 43 v 1B: "Do not fear for I have redeemed you, I have called you by name, you are mine."
Psalm 91: The mystery of suffering. Hosea's critique of the mystery of violence.
Psalm 22: The complexity of suffering. Rediscovering lament.
Psalm 46: Dealing with the storms of life. We are all in this together.
Psalm 77: 1-12: Dealing with the dark days. Nurturing moral courage in community.
Click to download Healing the Hurts Bible study


Matt Hinkley

Hinckley.jpgMatt Hinkley has been a teacher for 13 years and grew up hiking the Cascades. He loves spending time in nature and has a passion for outdoor field science education that gives learners the tools to discover their own passion for the natural world. He’s taught science in grades 7-12 in middle and high schools in Berkeley and Seattle. He added AP Environmental Science to the Seattle Public Schools’ catalog in 2008 and taught it at Nathan Hale High School, and was honored as the 2017 Distinguished Educator of the Year in Berkeley schools. He has presented at the meeting of the North American Association of Environmental Education and has written teaching guides for the American Federation of Teachers’ science cadre. Hinkley has taught nature journaling in the schoolyard and on field trips for his students, and he has facilitated professional development for K-8 teachers about nature journaling and other science teaching topics. He works to include all of his students and to promote the abilities of students from underserved populations, and is an activist for social justice through his union. Most of all, he loves being outdoors with a bunch of students – whether they’re children, adults, colleagues, clients, and whether they feel brand new to nature or are seasoned naturalists – he loves being outdoors and seeing his students discover their own passion for the natural world.

Session: Nature Journaling: See nature in a new way, build artistic confidence, and have fun!
Learn to use a field science notebook to sketch nature journal entries. We’ll go out in the field, make observations as scientists and artists, and find that anyone can express their love of nature through art!


Dr. Roy Hammerling

Roy_Hammerling.pngDr. Roy Hammerling, a PhD graduate of the University of Notre Dame in Church History, has been a Professor of Religion at Concordia College for over 20 years. His books include A History of Prayer: The First to the Fifteenth Century and The Lord’s Prayer in the Early Church: The Pearl of Great Price. He has written articles and lectured on Martin Luther, the history of Christian Spirituality, religion and film, Islam, and religion in modern culture. He travels regularly with students and alumni groups for Concordia College across Europe, Turkey, and Egypt. Likewise, he is a consultant for a documentary film company, Endless Eye Productions. The documentaries he has worked on range from “Message from the East” about one of Pakistan’s founding fathers, Allama Muhammad Iqbal to “My Country No More” about the Williston oil boom. He is the co-founder of PACODES (Panyijiar Community Development Services) a local North Dakota non-for-profit organization that works with the Lost Boys and Girls of Southern Sudan.  He is also an ELCA pastor who has served parishes in Pittsburg and Williston, ND in the 1980s. The son of German-Russian immigrants, Dr. Hammerling has been a guest lecturer in Pakistan, Europe, and the USA.

Session: Women of Wonder: Controversial Reforming Consciences
These sessions will look at how the re-formation of life can happen by looking at historical examples of great women of faith.  We will explore how the lives of wonderful women of the past can help us to examine our own lives in the present and help us work towards a better world of peace and justice. The women that we will look at are Hildegard of Bingen and her love of creation, Joan of Arc and her tragically short life, and Dorothy Day and her concern for social justice.


Rev. Dr. Jim Martin-Schramm

Jim_Martin-Schramm_deck_new_glasses.JPGJim Martin-Schramm joined the Religion faculty of Luther College in 1993. He is an ordained member of the ELCA and holds a doctorate in Christian Ethics from Union Theological Seminary in New York City.  He is the author, co-author, or co-editor of several publications including Eco-Reformation: Grace and Hope for a Planet in Peril; Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach; and Climate Justice: Ethics, Energy, and Climate Policy. Jim served on the inaugural board of the Iowa Wind Energy Association and recently completed terms as chair of the board of Iowa Interfaith Power & Light as well as the Winneshiek Energy District.  Jim coordinates the Colleges and Universities page for lutheransrestoringcreation.org, directs energy and climate programming for Luther’s Center for Sustainable Communities, and serves on the board of Luther College Wind Energy Project, LLC. Jim and his wife, Karen, live in Decorah, Iowa.

Session: Eco-Reformation: Grace and Hope for a Planet in Peril
A growing number of Christians believe we need to focus now on the urgent need for an Eco-Reformation.  Just as Martin Luther addressed the most important issues of his day, so too should those following in his footsteps address the most important issues affecting us today--climate change, loss of biodiversity, and other threats to the common good.  This three-part course will feature insights offered by some of the sixteen contributors to Eco-Reformation: Grace and Hope for a Planet in Peril, co-edited by Lisa E.Dahill and James B. Martin-Schramm.  The first session will serve as an introduction to the topic and explore core Lutheran theological insights at the heart of the call for an Eco-Reformation.  The second and third sessions will focus on how the Bible can guide our understanding, how our worship life can “rewild” our spirituality, and possibile ethical ramifications of an Eco-Reformation.


Dr. Laura Gifford

Laura_Gifford.jpgDr. Laura Gifford is a candidate for Word and Service ministry in the ELCA and a scholar of American political history.  Currently a student at Portland Seminary, she holds a Ph.D. in American history from the University of California, Los Angeles, and she taught history courses for several years at George Fox University and other northwest Oregon colleges. Her academic publications include books and articles on post-World War II American politics with a focus upon the history of party politics and growing political polarization. She has also published articles in Lutheran denominational magazines for both children and adults. Her call to pursue ministry rests in the conviction that moving beyond a zero-sum politics of scarcity toward a worldview of abundance requires engaging mind, body, and spirit. She lives in Portland, Oregon with her husband, daughter, and large orange cat.  A member of Resurrection Lutheran Church, Gifford enjoys jogging, hiking, reading, British TV, and volunteering at the Oregon Historical Society.

Session: Reclaiming the Middle Ground: Adventures in Radical Moderation
In our highly polarized political realm, moderates may be the last true radicals.  How might we reclaim the middle ground for productive public conversation, seeking solutions to important problems instead of prioritizing political point-making?  Laura Gifford will help participants engage the lessons of history and Scripture as we learn how to become agents of reconciliation, subverting hyper-partisanship in a quest for the common good.


Professor Sarah Day O'Connell

Day_OConnel_Sarah.jpgSarah Day-O’Connell is associate professor and associate chair of the Music Department at Skidmore College. She previously taught music history and ethnomusicology at Knox College, and at Valparaiso University as a Lilly Postdoctoral Fellow in Christ College. She is the author of several articles and book chapters on eighteenth-century music in its cultural context, and she currently serves as co-editor of the Cambridge Haydn Encyclopedia.  Her teaching interests center on interdisciplinary ways of thinking about music, combining musical analysis with interpretation of literary, visual, and material culture in order to explore how musical activity, especially singing, reflects and shapes broader social concerns – in particular about identity, politics, faith, and healing.  She examines transcriptions, “covers,” recordings, theories of performance, criticism, and listener reception in order to consider how music, through performance, changes meaning across times and cultures.  Sarah plays piano, historical keyboards, Japanese taiko drums, and (often with her husband Jeremy) Trinidadian steel drums. She has two tween/teen sons (Micah and Gabriel) and serves on the board of their school, the Waldorf School of Saratoga Springs.

Sessions:
Life, Works, and Legacy of American Composer and Conductor Leonard Bernstein – West Side Story
We’ll consider the work for which Bernstein is probably most famous, West Side Story.  Many people are familiar with this quintessential American musical about two rival gangs, the Jets and the Sharks.  But did you know it was first conceived as a conflict between Irish Catholics and Jews?  Both West Side Story and the original East Side Story grapple with issues that continue to occupy us today: race, urban violence, police violence, and immigration. 

Life, Works, and Legacy of American Composer and Conductor Leonard Bernstein - Mass: Theater Piece for Singers, Players, and Dancers
In a review of the first performance, the New York Times called it “a minor miracle of skillful mixing, mortising together folksy ballads, blues, rock, Broadway style song and dance numbers, Lutheran chorales, plain chant and bits of twelve-tone music.”  We’ll consider the history and development of the mass as a genre of religious music, Bernstein’s eclectic approach, and the composer’s own perspective on religion, faith, and spirituality.

Life, Works, and Legacy of American Composer and Conductor Leonard Bernstein - Young People’s Concerts
In addition to being a composer, conductor, pianist, and social activist, Bernstein was an articulate and inspiring advocate for music.  If you were watching prime-time television between 1958 and 1972, you would have likely seen his Young People’s Concerts, which aired on CBS.  Although Bernstein was certainly capable of being erudite (he delivered the Norton Lectures at Harvard University) his purpose in these programs was to make classical fun, accessible, and “cool.”  Under catchy titles like “The Anatomy of the Symphony,” “Berlioz Takes a Trip,” and “Bach Transmogrified” he spiced up music-theory fundamentals with appearances by celebrity guests and talented child performers, not to mention a huge dose of his own handsome, charismatic personal appeal.

July 29-August 3, 2018

Professor Jeremy Day O'Connell

Jeremy_Day_OConnell.JPGGuest Village Musician
Professor Jeremy Day O’Connell is Associate Professor of Music and Chair of the Music Department at Skidmore College, where he teaches music theory and history. He has served as the Choir Director at Highlands Presbyterian Church in Allendale, NJ (1993-4) and Music Director of the Cornell University Chorale (1996-97 and 1999-2001), as well as a founding member of the Cornell University Steelband (2001-2) and Director of the Valparaiso University Steelband (2003-4). He served as Lily Fellow in Humanities and Arts at Valparaiso University (2002-04).  He taught at Knox College in Galesburg IL before moving back East in 2015.

July 29-August 11, 2018

Will Chiles

Will_Chiles_3_4_Farm_2017_steven_spencer.jpgResident Musician
Will is currently writing an American roots symphonic folk-pop album. The music of this album is inspired by the sounds of "O Brother, Where Art Thou" and Paul Simon's "Graceland." Will is fascinated by the creative process and how to inspire folks to flourish. Will was a Lead Cook at Holden in 2007 and in a few subsequent Januaries and summers and loves hiking these mountains. He is the past composer-in-residence at The Banff Centre, Holden Village, and Springfield Chamber Chorus. Will splits his time between the music of Nashville, Tennessee, and the quiet of the family hard-wood tree farm, in Missouri.

July 30-August 3, 2018

Rev. Dr. Gary Mason

Mason_Gary.jpgRev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organisation based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co existence and shared space, it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianisation efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognised by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster. Gary is a Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is a Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peacebuilding, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation.

Session: Fear Not – Struggles and Suffering
Isaiah 43 v 1B: "Do not fear for I have redeemed you, I have called you by name, you are mine."
Psalm 91: The mystery of suffering. Hosea's critique of the mystery of violence.
Psalm 22: The complexity of suffering. Rediscovering lament.
Psalm 46: Dealing with the storms of life. We are all in this together.
Psalm 77: 1-12: Dealing with the dark days. Nurturing moral courage in community.
Click to download Healing the Hurts Bible study

 

Dr. Jennifer Blecha

jblecha.jpgJen Blecha is on the Geography & Environment faculty at San Francisco State University, where she teaches about food sovereignty, sustainable agriculture, environmental justice, and waste reduction. Taking students on field trips to farms, markets, restaurants, landfills, and wastewater treatment plants has made her think a lot about the “urban metabolism” ~ what goes in and what goes out. A lifelong Lutheran, she is currently a member of St Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco, where she enjoys roles in the choir, the Vestry, and as a lay deacon. Jen was part of Holden’s Winter Community in 1992-93.

Session: Zero Waste
Trees drop their leaves, which decompose. Animals leave waste, which enriches the soil. Humans are the only species that makes stuff that doesn’t go away and isn’t beneficial to other organisms. We have a wasting problem. Now with plastic microfibers showing up in drinking water, microplastic in seasalt, trash in the oceans, toxins polluting the soil, and landfills contributing to climate change, we need to eliminate the idea of “waste” and stop wasting our natural resources. In this series, we will learn about mindsets and approaches to our material lives that open up possibilities not just for reducing harm, but regenerating healthy ecosystems and building alternative social economies.


Katie Sharar

Katie_Sharar.jpgKatie Sharar has lived and worked in the U.S./Mexico borderlands since 2003. In this place, she has studied, taught college and adult basic education, accompanied people leaving detention and migrating from south to north, and crossed herself between Mexico and the U.S. thousands of times. She grew up in California, attended college in Minnesota, and moved immediately after graduation to El Paso/Juarez to live in solidarity with migrants in a Catholic Worker inspired house of hospitality. She then worked with immigrant families (mothers and children) recently released from a detention facility in Austin, Texas, before moving to Guatemala to accompany human rights advocates there. In 2008, she moved to Tucson, where she currently resides, to pursue a graduate degree. She has stayed because it is home, and to participate in the rhythms of the beautiful, inspiring, and heartbreaking place.

Session: The U.S./Mexico Border: Inequality, Resistance, and Sanctuary
In this course, we will examine the recent history of immigration, enforcement, inequality, and resistance in the U.S./Mexico borderlands (largely beginning in the 1980s, with an understanding that the historical underpinnings of inequality are long and structural).  We will then examine modes of resistance, focusing on the sanctuary movement and its origins in the faith community and current manifestations, in the borderlands. We will also look at movements that are led by people directly impacted by immigration policies and enforcement, and what it means to support those movements. We will conclude with a reflection on ways to create just, inclusive communities in the places we call home.


Rev. Kris Voss-Rothmeier

Kris_VR.jpgRev. Kris Voss-Rothmeier is a Presbyterian minister and middle school teacher in Portland, Oregon. Right after college, Kris worked and lived in a homeless shelter through a volunteer organization in an inner-city neighborhood in Washington, DC. He also worked as a full-time volunteer with Habitat for Humanity in San Antonio, TX and Baltimore, MD before living at Holden Village as the fire chief from 1990 to 1992.  He and his wife, Susan, met at Holden in 1991. He began seminary at San Francisco Theological Seminary in 1992 and spent his internship year in the Philippines in 1994. Upon graduation, he pastored two multiracial churches in St. Louis, Missouri in the late 1990s. In 1997, Kris was trained as an anti-racism workshop leader in St. Louis through the National Conference for Community and Justice and has preached and led workshops on anti-racism themes since then. In 2000, he and Susan moved to Portland where he served as Associate Pastor for youth and Christian Education at Milwaukie Presbyterian Church for five years.  In 2006, he earned his M.Ed from Portland State University and he currently teaches Social Studies at Clear Creek Middle School in Gresham, Oregon. Clear Creek has a very diverse student population where white students are the minority.  In June 2017, he completed a year-long course of study at the University of Portland which focused on equity training for educators. His wife works in the Multnomah County Library as a social worker. Their two children, Henry and Ellie, are both adopted from the Philippines and attend schools in Portland.

Sessions:

The Body of Christ Broken: The Origins of Racism
We'll begin by laying the groundwork for having conversations about race and racism. Then we'll explore the birth and development of racism and economic control in early America from the 1500s to the end of institutionalized slavery in America. Participants will also examine the racial make-up of their own communities and define three forms of modern racism in order to gain deeper insight into the effects of our early history.

The Body of Christ Broken:  Racism in Contemporary America
Since slavery ended over 150 years ago, racism has changed form several times.  As America has grown in wealth and power in the world, it has continued to create mechanisms to keep certain people in control and others from gaining control.  We'll explore those mechanisms which include race-based debt slavery, Jim Crow laws, and mass incarceration.

Healing the Body of Christ:  Confronting Racism in America
Talking about racism is difficult in our culture.  Being an active agent of change is even harder.  Though race influences practically every aspect of our daily lives, we are unsure about how to address racial differences that lead to power differences.  White people get stuck feeling guilty while people of color get frustrated that nothing ever really changes.  This session won't solve a problem that has taken hundreds of years to create, but it will provide tools and language for participants to be able to engage in thoughtful and healthy conversations about race and racism.


Dr. Kathryn Schifferdecker

Kathryn_Schifferdecker.jpgKathryn Schifferdecker is an Associate Professor of Old Testament at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN. She is also an ordained ELCA pastor, having served rural parishes in Iowa and Wisconsin. Her teaching interests include biblical narrative, creation theology, preaching, and questions of suffering. Along with her husband and three children, she enjoys hiking, backpacking, gardening, and watching movies.

Session: The Psalms as Tools for Prayer
The Psalms explore the depths and the heights of human existence. They thus have been used for thousands of years by both synagogue and church in liturgy and song. We will explore in this class how the Psalms can guide our own prayer lives in the midst of life, with all its sorrows, longings, joys, and thanksgivings. How do these ancient prayers re-form our own lives of faith and become for us a living Word of God?
Click to download the following resources for this session:
The Psalms as Tools for Prayer 1
The Psalms as Tools for Prayer 2: Lament Psalms
The Psalms as Tools for Prayer 3: Psalms Against the Enemy and Trust Psalms
The Psalms as Tools for Prayer 4: Praise and Thanksgiving Psalms


Chuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman

CP.jpgHolden Village Executive Directors
Chuck + Peg are artists and the Executive Directors of Holden Village. They have a shared ministry of reconciliation rooted in community building and shared artwork, a prophetic ministry which has taken them into some of the most intractable places of religious and political conflict around the globe. Through their studio Genesis + Art, they have worked in Belfast, Northern Ireland, as well as Israel/Palestine, India and many communities here in the USA. Their work in Belfast over many years runs especially deep - at the core of their sense of call to to the Village to build innovative new programs for Holden in its ongoing process of healing.

Peg worked for the Hallmark Company for over 20 years, leaving her career as a Creative Director of Retail Product Development to come to Holden. Chuck has a Master of Arts in Art + Theology / Missions from Luther Seminary, St. Paul. He was Vice President of Design for a Kansas City design firm and an Associate Creative Director for the Walt Disney Company.

Session: Art Workshop – Extension of the Theological Study of Psalms Offered by Kathryn Schifferdecker

August 4-10, 2018

Elisabeth Cherland

Elisabeth_Cherland.jpgGuest Village Musician
Elisabeth is a Lutheran church musician, choir director, singer, violinist, music educator, and former Village Musician originally from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. She has degrees from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, VanderCook College of Music in Chicago, and she is currently a DMA student in the Choral Conducting program at the University of Washington. Elisabeth lives in Seattle with her partner Kent, and two sons (Elijah and Leif). She loves hymns, doughnuts, knitting, leading group singing, and has a new appreciation for sunshine after a Seattle winter!

August 6-10, 2018

Pádraig Ó Tuama

Padraig_O_Tuama.jpgPoet, theologian and group worker, Pádraig has worked with groups in Ireland, Britain, the US and Australia. With interests in storytelling, group work, theology and conflict, Pádraig lectures, leads retreats and writes both poetry and prose. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Divinity from Maryvale Institute, Birmingham (validated by Pontifical College, Maynooth) and a Masters of Theology from Queens University Belfast.

Session: Border Crossings with Ruth – linked session with Glenn Jordan
These sessions will focus on the book of Ruth to help us discern how our biblical text can speak to the public discussion about the various forms of borders we construct between peoples. Glenn will lead participants in reflection on the text and Pádraig will lead a workshop in writing poetry and prayer forms out of the chosen text.


Glenn Jordan

Glenn_Jordan.jpgGlenn is a native of Bray in Co Wicklow in Ireland and has been living in Northern Ireland since 1987. For 15 years he has worked on Skainos Square a transformative urban regeneration project in the inner city of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is currently pursuing doctoral studies in Isaiah looking at the issue of imagination and community transformation. He enjoys sport, particularly rugby, cycling and football, walking his two dogs, listening to music and blogging on the crooked shore.

Session: Border Crossings with Ruth: Reflection on the Text linked session with Pádraig Ó Tuama
These sessions will focus on the book of Ruth to help us discern how our biblical text can speak to the public discussion about the various forms of borders we construct between peoples. Glenn will lead participants in reflection on the text and Pádraig will lead a workshop in writing poetry and prayer forms out of the chosen text.


Chuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman

CP.jpgHolden Village Executive Directors
Chuck + Peg are artists and the Executive Directors of Holden Village. They have a shared ministry of reconciliation rooted in community building and shared artwork, a prophetic ministry which has taken them into some of the most intractable places of religious and political conflict around the globe. Through their studio Genesis + Art, they have worked in Belfast, Northern Ireland, as well as Israel/Palestine, India and many communities here in the USA. Their work in Belfast over many years runs especially deep - at the core of their sense of call to to the Village to build innovative new programs for Holden in its ongoing process of healing.

Peg worked for the Hallmark Company for over 20 years, leaving her career as a Creative Director of Retail Product Development to come to Holden. Chuck has a Master of Arts in Art + Theology / Missions from Luther Seminary, St. Paul. He was Vice President of Design for a Kansas City design firm and an Associate Creative Director for the Walt Disney Company.

Art Workshop: Heaven of the Heart: Creating Space for Sacred Imagination
Chuck + Peg create a space where no one person or perspective can give us answers. Letting go of our certainty helps us find common ground, while creating something together that we could not create alone. In our workshop, participants will push back the boundaries of familiar distractions and enter a Sabbath time in which to explore how the intersection between art and spirit can deepen insight for creative leadership and building community.


John Noltner

John_Noltner.jpgJohn is a Minnesota-based photographer. For 25 years he has made images for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. In 2009 he founded A Peace of My Mind, a multimedia arts project that explores our common humanity through portraits and storytelling as he asks people from across the country to consider the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?”

Session: Peace of My Mind
Photographer John Noltner drove 40,000 miles across the country asking people the simple question, "What does peace mean to you?" In a world that asks us to focus on what can separate us, A Peace of My Mind asks us to rediscover the common humanity that connects us. Join John in conversations about how storytelling can connect us. Sessions will revolve around the inspiring stories in his series as everyday Americans share their experiences of hope, forgiveness and transformation. Themes of individual sessions will include:

-be willing to sit with uncomfortable realities
-look for solutions
-stay at the table
-stay true to your values
-try again
-forgive



Dr. Larry Rasmussen

Larry_Rasmussen.jpgLarry L. Rasmussen is Reinhold Niebuhr Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics, Union Theological Seminary, New York City.  His book, Earth-Honoring Faith: Religious Ethics in a New Key, received the Nautilus Book Awards as the Gold Prize winner for Ecology/Environment and as the Grand Prize winner for best 2014 book overall. He has been the organizer of the decade project on Earth-Honoring Faith at Ghost Ranch. An earlier volume, Earth Community, Earth Ethics, won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in Religion of 1997. He served as a member of the Science, Ethics, and Religion Advisory Committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was a recipient of a Henry Luce Fellowship in Theology, 1998-99, the Burnice Fjellman Award for Distinguished Christian Ministries in Higher Education, the Joseph Sittler Award for Outstanding Leadership in Theological Education, and the UNITAS (Distinguished Alumnus) Award from Union Theological Seminary, New York. From 1990-2000 he served as co-moderator of the World Council of Churches unit, Justice, Peace, Creation. He and Nyla live in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They are Santa Fe County Master Gardeners.

Session: Earth-Honoring Faith: Journey of the Universe
We live amidst immense challenges on every front—social, political, ecological and spiritual. Many observers say we need a new story to reorient and ground ourselves to meet these challenges. Journey of the Universe, inspired by Thomas Berry, is an Emmy award-winning documentary that brings together modern science and the humanities, including religion, art, and philosophy. We will use Journey excerpts and interviews to begin our own discussions about the challenges we face.

Resources for Journey of the Universe (for congregations as well as individual and small group use)

Websites:

Books:

  • Berry, Thomas. Evening Thoughts: Reflecting on Earth as Sacred Community.
  • Berry, Thomas. The Great Work: Our Way into the Future.
  • Brown, William P. The Seven Pillars of Creation: The Bible, Science, and the Ecology of Wonder.
  • Hawken, Paul, ed., Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Respond to Global Warming.
  • Heschel, Abraham. I Asked for Wonder: A Spiritual Anthology. Ed. Samuel Dresner.
  • Oliver, Mary. “The Summer Day,” House of Light.
  • Rasmussen, Larry. Earth-honoring Faith: Religious Ethics in a New Key.
  • Swimme, Brian & Tucker, Mary Evelyn. Journey of the Universe. (This is essentially the text of the documentary DVD of the same name.)

 


Bishop Elizabeth Eaton

Elizabeth_Eaton_2.jpgElected as the ELCA’s fourth presiding bishop at the 2013 ELCA Churchwide Assembly, the Rev. Elizabeth Eaton earned a Master of Divinity degree from Harvard Divinity School and a Bachelor of Music Education from the College of Wooster. Ordained in 1981, Eaton served three congregations in Ohio before being elected bishop of the ELCA Northeastern Ohio Synod in 2006 and re-elected in May 2013. Eaton’s four emphases for the ELCA are: We are church. We are Lutheran. We are church together. We are church for the sake of the world. These four emphases are fundamental to identifying who the ELCA is. In 2015, under Eaton’s leadership, the ELCA underwent an extensive vision process to help this church journey faithfully and effectively together in the years ahead. The process resulted in Future Directions 2025, a strategic framework that serves shared leadership across the ELCA to realize common aspirations and better face the challenges of this church. In addition, with Eaton’s guidance, the ELCA launched Bishop Eaton’s Leadership Initiative, which encourages all ELCA members to seek out and inspire gifted people in our congregations and communities to consider a call to the ministry of the gospel. Eaton also called together a task force in 2016 to draft a policy statement for inter-religious relations in the ELCA. As the chief ecumenical officer of the ELCA, she represents this church in a wide range of ecumenical and interfaith settings. She is the vice president for North America on the Council of The Lutheran World Federation and serves on the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the USA Governing Board and Development Committee, and Religions for Peace USA Council of Presidents. As presiding bishop, Eaton travels extensively, representing the ELCA in a variety of capacities. This has included a visit to a Syrian refugee camp, commemorating the 500th anniversary of the Reformation with Lutherans from around the world in Namibia and participating in an ecumenical service commemorating the Reformation in the Lund, Sweden, cathedral with Pope Francis. Eaton’s husband is the Rev. T. Conrad Selnick, an Episcopal priest. They are parents of two adult children, Rebeckah and Susannah.

Session: Living Word


Kerri Meyer

Kerri_Meyer.jpgKerri Meyer currently serves St. Gregory of Nyssa Episcopal Church in San Francisco as Lay Associate Minister. She presents workshops on paperless songleading and composition with the non-profit organization Music that Makes Community. Her paperless songs for worship have been used and published (the irony!) by Augsburg Fortress, GIA and the World Council of Churches. She earned her M.Div from Pacific School of Religion in 2016 and lives with her wife, Jennifer Blecha, in Oakland, CA.

Sessions:

Introduction to Paperless Songleading for Worship and Public Action
Whether we’re at worship or at work in the world, including paperless songs in our musical repertoire helps our communities welcome the full musical participation of everyone, including folks who may not feel comfortable reading music (because they are visually impaired, too young to read, or simply don't know how.)  Singing paperless songs can help us all practice different ways of paying attention and listening when we sing together. Paperless songs are also extremely portable.  You don't need a book.  You don't need a photocopier.  You just need your voice, and you can make music wherever you go! You can learn more about the theory and practice of leading paperless music at a Music that Makes Community workshop.

Workshop: Composing Paperless Songs for Worship and Public Action
In this workshop, we’ll discuss the five major categories of paperless songs and explore the qualities that help short pieces of music contribute to the energy, cohesion, intention, and formation of a group.  Participants will select or write a text, set it to music, and teach it to the group.  Participation in the Introduction to Paperless Songleading Session is highly encouraged.

Paperless Musical Test Kitchen
This is a 2-hour opportunity for people to practice their songleading skills, to workshop a new paperless composition and to reflect on ways that their own communities might incorporate paperless music into their common life.


Rev. Erik Samuelson & Annemarie Russell

Erik_Samuelson.jpgRev. Erik Samuelson is a minister of Word and Sacrament in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America. He has been working in the area of vocational discernment and spiritual formation (particularly in intergenerational and multi-racial communities that engage young adults) for over 10 years. Recently he served as Director of Vocational and Spiritual Formation at Trinity Lutheran College where many of the spiritual practices in this workshop were developed. Erik is the founder of “Come Alive Consulting” which offering coaching, workshops, practices, and resources to individuals and communities looking to deepen their sense of vocation and spiritual formation.

Annemarie_Russell.JPGAnnemarie Russell is a singer/songwriter, writer, and English teacher. Independent, truthful, and fiercely optimistic about what's possible, her unapologetic songwriting leaves listeners inspired, challenged, and hopeful. At Trinity Lutheran College, she was part of the development team for the spiritual practices in this workshop, and is a practitioner in the art of accompanying people in vocational discernment and spiritual discovery. Annemarie brings her own creative flair and practices to the work of story sharing, artistic expression, and spiritual formation as she seeks to live into the intersection of faith, art, and story.

Session: Listening for the Sound of the Genuine:  Re-forming our sacred identity and vocations through holy listening, storytelling, and embodied spiritual practices
Shortly before he died, Rev. Dr. Howard Thurman addressed the students of Spelman College with the following words: “There is something in every one of you that waits, listens for the genuine in yourself—and if you cannot hear it, you will never find whatever it is for which you are searching … and if you cannot hear the sound of the genuine in you, you will all of your life spend your days on the ends of strings that somebody else pulls.” We live in a society where identity is defined either by what we consume or by biological/cultural/economic factors seemingly outside of our control. Society sees vocation as those occupations which fuel consumption or that soothe the victims of injustice who “spend their days on the ends of strings somebody else pulls.” In these sessions, we will take the opportunity to slow down and practice the ancient arts of holy listening, storytelling, and theological reflection as we seek to connect more deeply to the “Sound of the Genuine” and re-form our understanding of who God has created us to be. Through music, writing, and embodied spiritual practices we will delve into those inward and outward pressures that have shaped and continue to shape us, as we re-form a sense of how God is calling us to live out justice seeking vocations in the world. In “practicing the practices,” participants will be equipped to take these tools home to continue the ongoing process of individual and community re-formation in their contexts.

Nadia Bolz-Weber

Nadia_Bolz_Weber_photo.jpgNadia Bolz-Weber is the author of two New York Times bestselling memoirs: Pastrix; The Cranky, Beautiful Faith of a Sinner & Saint (2013) and Accidental Saints; Finding God in All the Wrong People (2015). She is an ordained Lutheran pastor (ELCA) and still works as the founding pastor of House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, Colorado. Nadia travels domestically and internationally as a speaker and has been featured on NPR's Morning Edition, On Being with Krista Tippett, Fresh Air, CNN, and in the Washington Post, Bitch magazine, and The Daily Beast. Nadia lives in Denver with her family and her Great Dane, Zacchaeus.

Session: Sex and Christianity

August 11-17, 2018

Elisabeth Cherland

Elisabeth_Cherland.jpgGuest Village Musician
Elisabeth is a Lutheran church musician, choir director, singer, violinist, music educator, and former Village Musician originally from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. She has degrees from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, VanderCook College of Music in Chicago, and she is currently a DMA student in the Choral Conducting program at the University of Washington. Elisabeth lives in Seattle with her partner Kent, and two sons (Elijah and Leif). She loves hymns, doughnuts, knitting, leading group singing, and has a new appreciation for sunshine after a Seattle winter!

Interfaith Dialogue Week: August 12-18, 2018

Holden Village is pleased to announce that our annual Interfaith Dialogue Week will be co-sponsored by the Treacy Levine Center for 2018-2020. The week will feature well-known faith leaders, theologians, peacemakers, and artists who will focus on building interfaith dialogue and help us learn and live together through these challenging times. The Treacy Levine Center has designated $7,500 for 2018-2020. 

Interfaith Dialogue Faculty for the week of August 12-18, 2018 include:

Rev. Terry Kyllo, Imam Adam Jamal, & Yohanna Kinberg

Human beings are facing three challenges: 1) What gives life meaning? 2) How will we live with each other given our cultural differences? 3) How will we live as a part of the earth’s ecosystem, while respecting it and future generations?  Anxiety about these challenges are creating deep anxiety and a sense of despair about the future. We wonder if we can find a way through these challenges. Each of the three Abrahamic traditions began in such times of change. An Imam, a Rabbi and a Pastor will reflect on these challenges, the gifts that each tradition can offer and how we can learn and live together through these challenging times.

Terry_Kyllo.jpgThe Rev. Terry Kyllo is an ELCA pastor serving as the director of Neighbors in Faith an interfaith effort to recognize Muslims as neighbors and partners in building a more peaceful world, authorized by the Episcopal and Lutheran churches in western Washington. A graduate of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, he has been a pastor since 1991 and has served in partnership between Episcopalians and Lutherans since 2004. He is the author of two books, Being Human and Apprenticeship. He feels that interfaith dialogue is essential in learning to live with each other given our cultural differences. He and his wife Sheryl live in Anacortes, WA. They have two daughters. Terry was the recipient of the Faith Action Network Interfaith Leadership Award in 2016, the Interfaith Leadership Award from the Muslim Association of Puget Sound in 2017, and the Sultan and Saint Peace award in 2017.

Adam_Jamal.pngImam Adam Jamal is the Executive Director of Education and Assistant Imam at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound or MAPS in Redmond, WA. He was born and raised in Houston, Texas. He truly believes in the ability of faith to bring communities together. His current focus at MAPS is to help American Muslim youth face the challenges of growing up in a climate of rising Islamophobia. With his traditional training in Islam and a Master’s in Education, he hopes to dispel stereotypes and misconceptions about Islam and Muslims.

Kinberg_Yohanna.jpgYohanna Kinberg, a lifelong resident of the Pacific Northwest, and a second generation Rabbi. She has served the greater Seattle area as a Rabbi for 15 years. Rabbi Kinberg is a graduate of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College and currently serves a Reform congregation, Kol Ami, in Woodinville, WA. She is married to Rabbi Seth Goldstein and is mother to two boys, Ozi and Erez.



Session: Abrahamic Traditions: Discovering our Common Humanity in a Time of Anxiety

Human beings are facing three challenges: 1) What gives life meaning? 2) How will we live with each other given our cultural differences? 3) How will we live as a part of the earth’s ecosystem, while respecting it and future generations. Anxiety about these challenges are creating deep anxiety and a sense of despair about the future. We wonder if we can find a way through these challenges. Each of the three Abrahamic traditions began in such times of change. An Imam, a Rabbi and an Pastor will reflect on these challenges, the gifts that each tradition can offer and how we can learn and live together through these challenging times.



John Noltner

John_Noltner.jpgJohn is a Minnesota-based photographer. For 25 years he has made images for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. In 2009 he founded A Peace of My Mind, a multimedia arts project that explores our common humanity through portraits and storytelling as he asks people from across the country to consider the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?”

Session: A Peace of My Mind
Photographer John Noltner drove 40,000 miles across the country asking people the simple question, "What does peace mean to you?" In a world that asks us to focus on what can separate us, A Peace of My Mind asks us to rediscover the common humanity that connects us. Join John in conversations about how storytelling can connect us. Sessions will revolve around the inspiring stories in his series as everyday Americans share their experiences of hope, forgiveness and transformation. Themes of individual sessions will include:

-be willing to sit with uncomfortable realities
-look for solutions
-stay at the table
-stay true to your values
-try again
-forgive

 

Additional faculty for the week of August 12-18, 2018:


Glenn Jordan

Glenn_Jordan.jpgGlenn is a native of Bray in Co Wicklow in Ireland and has been living in Northern Ireland since 1987. For 15 years he has worked on Skainos Square a transformative urban regeneration project in the inner city of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is currently pursuing doctoral studies in Isaiah looking at the issue of imagination and community transformation. He enjoys sport, particularly rugby, cycling and football, walking his two dogs, listening to music and blogging on the crooked shore.

Session: Border Crossings with Ruth: Reflection on the Text
Glenn will focus on the book of Ruth to help us discern how our biblical text can speak to the public discussion about the various forms of borders we construct between peoples.


Dr. Larry Rasmussen

Larry_Rasmussen.jpgLarry L. Rasmussen is Reinhold Niebuhr Professor Emeritus of Social Ethics, Union Theological Seminary, New York City.  His book, Earth-Honoring Faith: Religious Ethics in a New Key, received the Nautilus Book Awards as the Gold Prize winner for Ecology/Environment and as the Grand Prize winner for best 2014 book overall. He has been the organizer of the decade project on Earth-Honoring Faith at Ghost Ranch. An earlier volume, Earth Community, Earth Ethics, won the prestigious Grawemeyer Award in Religion of 1997. He served as a member of the Science, Ethics, and Religion Advisory Committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and was a recipient of a Henry Luce Fellowship in Theology, 1998-99, the Burnice Fjellman Award for Distinguished Christian Ministries in Higher Education, the Joseph Sittler Award for Outstanding Leadership in Theological Education, and the UNITAS (Distinguished Alumnus) Award from Union Theological Seminary, New York. From 1990-2000 he served as co-moderator of the World Council of Churches unit, Justice, Peace, Creation. He and Nyla live in Santa Fe, New Mexico. They are Santa Fe County Master Gardeners.

Session: Earth-Honoring Faith: Bible and Ethics—A New Conversation
Earth is changing in ways it hasn’t for hundreds of thousands of years. At the same time, Christianity is breaking away from its millennium-long geographical and cultural center in the Euro-West. This sets the stage for a new conversation—re-reading Scripture in light of our deeply altered context. How does the Bible now shape our collective identity and inform our character and conduct?

 

 

Laura Norton

LauraNorton.JPGLaura Norton is a Bellingham, WA artist whose “grace and grit in modern calligraphy” bring alive words of justice and faith using bamboo and metal pens, goose quills, sable brushes, Japanese stick ink, wax, and acrylic—on walls, windows, silk, clothing, and paper. In addition to teaching art and calligraphy, she delights in giving presentations on the arts’ connection to faith and justice. Laura’s art for the Revised Common Lectionary has been used by congregations throughout the U.S. as well as the U.K. and Australia and she continues the joy-filled discipline of creating new calligraphic designs weekly for subscribers of many denominations. She has participated in numerous international calligraphy conferences and has studied with master calligraphers from around the world, including Donald Jackson, artistic director of the Saint John’s Bible and Scribe to the Queen Elizabeth II. Her two-year experience traveling through all 48 contiguous states in an RV with her young family shaped her sense of adventure and of kinship with people of all socioeconomic levels. Laura currently serves as Chair of the Justice Committee at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church in Bellingham, WA and on the Board of Grunewald Guild in Plain, WA.

Sessions:

Justice-seeking Artists: Art and Influence in Modern Culture
Artists help to create social change and push for justice in ways that are uniquely arresting and influential. We’ll look at work by such artists as Kehinde Wiley, Janet McKenzie, Mickey McGrath, Corita Kent, and Elizabeth Catlett and contemplate their impact on racial and social justice in the U.S.

“Justice Journals”
Participants will create journals and be introduced to tools & techniques for hand lettering as a way to amplify meaningful quotes on justice, compassion, or other theme. Design and embellishment ideas will help to bring important words and ideas newfound vigor and life.

Prayerful, Powerful Posters
Create a sign or poster which expresses a motto or declaration using your own hand lettering, vibrant color, and captivating design. Signs and posters might be displayed in yards, car windows, or in public rallies.


Rachel Forde & Jennifer McIntyre

Forde_Rachel.jpgRachel Forde has an attorney at the Snohomish County Public Defender Association for 12 years. She received a Washington Defender Association President’s Award in 2007 and served on the WDA Board of Directors from 2008-2013. She currently serves on the Washington State Bar Association Legislative Committee. She is a 2005 graduate of Indiana University School of Law in Bloomington, IN.  Rachel also has an extensive background in politics including working for Gore, Kerry and Obama presidential campaigns.


McIntyre_Jennifer.jpgJennifer is Assistant Director of Snohomish County Public Defender Association and an affiliate Instructor of Law at University of Washington overseeing the Street Law Clinic. Snohomish County Public Defender Association provides legal defense to indigent people accused of crimes. The Street Law Clinic is an outreach program for law students to educate high school students in basic concepts of law.

Sessions:

From Incarceration to Re-formation – Increasing Mercy and Grace in the Justice System
Overview of alternatives to incarceration, therapeutic courts and their outcomes and how citizens can promote these options in their communities.

From Incarceration to Re-formation – Bail as an injustice for the poor
Bail is used as a means of keeping the accused incarcerated before a finding of guilt. The use of bail is an injustice to the poor, leaving those without to face pressure to plead guilty to a crime for which they might be innocent.

From Incarceration to Re-formation – Welcoming modern day lepers back to our communities
The most vilified people in our society are those who have been convicted of crimes, sex crimes being by far the worst. Many individuals convicted of crimes of violence, sex, and dishonesty are eventually released and need to be reintegrated into society instead of outcast for the good of everyone.

Dr. Anthony Bateza

anthony_bateza.jpgAnthony Bateza earned degrees from Iowa State University (B.S, 2002), Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago (M.Div., 2006), and Princeton Theological Seminary (Ph.D., 2017). Dr. Bateza is a specialist in Martin Luther, moral theology and Christian ethics. His research examines Luther’s understanding of human agency and his relationship with the virtue tradition. His other scholarly interests include the broader Augustinian tradition, the impact of Luther’s thought on 19th century philosophy, and questions of race, identity, and social justice. Anthony is an ordained pastor in the Lutheran Church (ELCA). He lives in Northfield with his wife, Cynthia, and two young children, Austen and Magdalene. In his free time he enjoys cycling, board games, gardening and cooking.

Session: Courage in Fearful Times: Letters and Lesson from Christian Traditions
In this session we will explore Christian understandings of, and responses to, fear in our lives, and particularly as fear has been understood by those who have worked to uncover and challenge racism in the United States. We will undertake this task by focusing on Biblical lessons and powerful letters from past and present figures. We will begin our week by asking some foundational questions about what fear is, and how it is is understood as a friend and foe in the Biblical tradition. In our second session we will look at biblical and theological resources (e.g., St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Martin Luther) for combatting fear, with special attention to the virtues of honesty, courage, and hope. In our final sessions we will look at letter writing in the Bible and today as ways of responding to the fear and despair that contiue to haunt and threaten justice. In these sessions we will take up figures such as St. Paul, Martin Luther King Jr., James Baldwin, and Ta-Nehisi Coates.

August 18-25, 2018

Elizabeth Damico

Elizabeth_Damico_teaching_faculty_2018_teaching_staff.pngGuest Village Musician
Pastor Elizabeth is originally from the northwest corner of Minnesota and studied music (piano/voice) and religion at Concordia College in Moorhead, MN. After college she moved to the Pacific Northwest to work full time in music ministry and there she developed her love for the mountains and working with people in the church! Elizabeth strives to create community and joy through music making, moving through a variety of styles to bring God’s Word to the heart of people in worship. Elizabeth attended Luther Seminary and received her Master of Divinity in 2012. She has served as village musician and pastor at Holden Village, and associate pastor of worship at Westwood Lutheran church in St. Louis Park, MN and is now thrilled to be serving the amazing people of Memorial Lutheran Church of Afton as Senior Pastor. Elizabeth is blessed to travel through this life with her spunky, smart daughter, Micaela (former mayor of Holden Village)!

August 20-24, 2018

Cecilia Porter

Cecilia_Porter.jpgCecilia Porter holds a bachelor’s degree in anthropology from the University of Victoria, and a master’s degree in archaeology from the University of Calgary. In between she worked on the central coast of BC on archaeological projects that made it a priority to collaborate with indigenous nations and work within their frameworks. For her Masters degree her research once again focused on working with an indigenous nation, this time the Inuit of northern Hudson Bay who wished to reach beyond their remote Arctic location to tell their youth and all the world about their impressive history, in order to bridge gaps between peoples. This work is important on an international level because knowledge and understanding fights racism and discrimination. Porter has travelled extensively to places such as Africa, South America, Greenland and tiny indigenous villages in the Canadian Arctic and northwest coast, expanding her worldview.

Sessions:

Arvia'juaq National Historic Site: a case study in overcoming barriers of culture, language, and remoteness  
In the North of Canada, accessible by a gravel landing strip or ship in the summer and by only a snow landing strip the rest of the year, lies the tiny Inuit community of Arviat. This community is the guardian of a significant cultural and archaeological site: Arvia'juaq National Historic Site. The elders of Arviat  desired a way to bring Arvia'juaq to their youth and to the wider world, as they know that knowledge is power for their youth and is the first step to respect and understanding from the outside world. In partnership with the University of Calgary the Arvia'juaq Virtual Tour was created. This session will discuss the Arvia'juaq  project as well as the challenges of overcoming remoteness and promoting understanding and engagement across cultures, languages and geography, in the face of deeply embedded racism.

Re-Forming relationships with our Indigenous Peoples: Residential Schools, Reconciliation and the Church
In the US, as in Canada, indigenous children were required - sometimes forcibly taken- to attend schools with the express intent of "educating the savage out of them". These schools were run by churches and many abuses occurred there. In this session we will discuss the legacy of residential schools, moves towards reconciliation and what role church members may have in this process.

Seeing the landscape like an Archaeologist
Archaeology changes the way you see the world. Evidence of human activity is written on the earth all around us, and for the most part we walk right past it. For this session we will take a walk to Winston Camp and see the landscape the way an archaeologist does. There are more subtle things to see than concrete formations!


Pastor David Nagler

David_Nagler.jpgPastor David Nagler is a born and raised Southern Californian. His degrees are from Humboldt State University, University of Redlands, and Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. He has served congregations in Encinitas, San Diego, and Bend, Oregon. For 2 years, he served in Madagascar in a project that started interfaith dialogue between Christian and Muslim communities. From 2012 until January of 2015 he was the CEO and Pastor for Central City Lutheran Mission in San Bernardino. CCLM is a social ministry of the ELCA that provides housing, food, education, health care, and empowerment for the most vulnerable people in a city of extreme poverty. Currently he serves as pastor at Christ Lutheran Church in Pacific Beach, California. He has twin daughters and is married to Ivy Nagler who teaches yoga and economics for the University of Redlands.

Session: What in the World? – The Adaptive Change Facing the Church
The goal of the sessions will be to examine the myriad of competing forces facing the church in America with a prayerful eye toward what God is doing in our midst. We will look at the historical motivations for the current shape of things. We will listen to the metaphors of Jesus in his parables to open us up to new possibilities and finally we will dream together about what we might become.


Heather Murphy

Heather_Murphy.jpgHeather is a Pacific Northwest notecard artist, watercolorist, nature writer and wildlife biologist. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Washington in Wildlife Habitat Management; and a Forest Technology degree from Wenatchee Valley College. While studying the sciences, she took drawing courses at WVC and UW. Focused on watercolor Heather was mentored by Los Angeles painter, Barbara Kerwin and New Zealand artist David Barker. Walleye Cards, LLC and Wildtales Journals, Heather’s naturalist notecard and journal business, was founded in 1997. Her small independent business donates over 10% of sales to conservation and arts organizations. Retired from the U.S. Forest Service as a wildlife biologist; Heather’s career spanned from 1974 to 2005. She is currently a nature journal instructor and a consulting wildlife biologist. She continues to lead Citizen Science programs as a volunteer for the U.S.F.S.

Session: Nature Hikes and Field Notes