Summer Teaching Faculty

2019 Summer TEACHING FACULTY

Holden's visiting summer faculty form the backbone of our educational programming. View the information below to learn more about each of Holden's 2019 visiting faculty members and their sessions.

2018 Recommended Reading

June 10-14, 2019

PASTOR RON RUDE

Rude_Ron.jpgPastor Ron Rude brings creativity to Christian theology and the natural science, believing their interplay teaches Christians and others much about faithful/sustainable living. He is the Lutheran campus pastor (ELCA) at the University of Arizona. Interests include hiking, organic gardening, presidential history, music and travel.

Ron has taught courses at Holden Village, the University of Arizona’s Osher Lifelong Learning Institute, Chicago Theological Seminary, and in various forums and workshops. An author of two books, “Abel Emerging” and “ReConsidering Christianity” – his particular teaching style is the weaving of history, biblical theology, and the modern sciences into a thoughtful and practical theology for living faithfully and sustainably in God’s world today.

He holds degrees from Gustavus Adolphus College and Luther Seminary and has served congregations in New York, Minnesota, and Colorado. His wife, Nancy, works at Habitat for Humanity. Their daughter, Angela, is a social worker in Salt Lake City, and their other daughter, Jen, is ELCA campus pastor at PLU in Tacoma WA.

Sessions: God’s story of life and God’s story of Jesus through New Eyes
The natural sciences have opened us to new understandings that are quite different from Reformation times and even biblical worldviews. What are the implications and possibilities of seeing God’s story of life and God’s story of Jesus in new ways. Is it time for a new Reformation?


FR. ROBERT ROSSI

Rossi_Fr_Robert.jpgFr. Robert Rossi has been a member of the Crosier Order for 55 years and a Catholic priest for 48.  He has had a very active and satisfying ministry that has included pastoral and educational services, writing, leadership in the Crosier Order and missionary work in the Congo and Brazil.  Throughout the years, wherever he has been, he has given special attention to Christian formation through teaching, retreats and spiritual direction. He continues to dedicate his time to those services as a staff member of Crosier Village Ministries in Phoenix, where he is known as an innovator and effective minister.  He is now engaged in Christian formation programs and a veterans' ministry called CrossWalk and a 2-yr. training program in Spanish for lay Latino spiritual directors which he himself designed and directs.   His experience has given him a very wide view and appreciation of the Church, as well as a great sensitivity to other peoples’ cultures in Africa, South America, Asia and Europe.  As a Crosier religious, he has been shaped by the spirituality of the Cross to stand by his brothers and sisters who suffer in any way and accompany them to new hope. 

Session: Cross Spiritual Exercises

The CROSS SPIRITUAL EXERCISES, inspired by the Paschal Mystery of Jesus, lead a person thoughtfully and prayerfully through experiences of the Cross toward transformation and more effective ministry. The Exercises are comprised of four movements, each of which includes instruction and a reflection exercise that deals with a personal experience of suffering.  The Exercises focus on spiritual growth through suffering and, with the accompaniment of a skilled “cross-coach,” aid the person to face the challenges of suffering courageously. The Exercises help the participant understand and accept the Cross as always giving promise of healing, more abundant life, greater freedom and deeper hope. As a result, the Christian is empowered to better serve the advancement of the Kingdom of God.

DR. OCTAVIO CARRASCO

Carrasco_Octavio.jpgOctavio Pascal Carrasco is an historian of American culture and music with special interest in the processes of social change, cultural resistance, and the religious imagination. As an undergraduate student at Princeton University, he was blessed to work with Br. Cornel West, exploring the religious dimensions of Tupac Shakur’s music and death. He completed his Masters Degree at Starr King School for the Ministry in Berkeley, CA with Rev. Dr. Gabriella Lettini. As the ’11-’12 Hilda Mason teaching fellow he developed and taught the course Music & Art for Social Change . He was further blessed to complete his PhD work with Br. West, Daisy Machado, and Troy Messenger at Union Theological Seminary in NY, focusing on “the long sixties” as a period of profound awakening in American history. Octavio’s primary mode of transportation is walking, using the “eyes in his feet” to remain connected with his surroundings. His academic studies are grounded in his time living in Guatemala, Spain (Barcelona is his favorite world city!) and the Czech Republic. He can be found teaching English as a second language wherever there are students and juggling book loans at ALL the local libraries.

Sessions:
Rituals of Resistance: 500 years of Religious Adaptation inGuatemala
The Holy Week/ Semana Santa rituals that happen every year in the Guatemalan highlands reveal important aspects of North American history and Christianity. On the one hand, there are the traditionally Christian rituals of Palm Sunday, Good Friday and Easter carried out in the center of town. On the other hand, woven through the entire period of Lent, there are other older rituals interspersed, disguised, and interpolated by Maya traditionalists. During Holy Week, these two perspectives come together to enact the death of Jesus and the symbolic start of a new ceremonial year. This does not reflect a simplistic history of conquest and domination, but rather a history of adaptation, creativity, reflection and resistance. In this section, we will explore the ways the Tz’utujil Mayas of Guatemala interpreted and absorbed Christianity to protect and prolong their way of life.

The Religious Dimensions of Popular Music

In what ways does music speak to, or provide a vehicle for, the religious experience? Does music evoke the sublime, or does it corrupt the performers and listeners? These are questions that have been debated for 1000 years or more in worship settings. Examples include concern about emotions and dancing, controversy around women taking part in church choirs, as well as more recent legends of the Devil waiting at the crossroads, and the cyclical generational concern over the music of the youth. Yet music as we know it grew out of a religious setting in the first place. While emerging forms of music are almost always shunned or labeled as dangerous, we are entering a time when popular music is one of the centers of cultural identity and performance. This section will explore the religious roots of music, as we know it while inviting us to interrogate how we think of the religious/secular divide. How we understand the religious impulse relates to what we can understand music to be. Furthermore, we will explore how music accompanies, provokes and responds to social change.


Borderlands Religion and the Residue of History

The United States of America exists on a landmass with contested significance. The place names reflect the many histories of the land and the people on it, even as mainstream society tends to overlook that history. Some scholars argue that the entire southern half of the country exists as remnants of Spanish-American borderlands dating from the 1700s. In this framing, the borderlands are a space between settled colonies where a decidedly unique blending of cultures took place. This gives rise to a culture that was neither Spanish nor English, nor strictly indigenous, but rather separate from all three. If we consider the complex relationship of the cultural encounter of Europeans, Africans and Aborigines that defines U.S. history, it becomes

imperative to consider the ways the entire country is a borderlands. This moves beyond our modern conceptions of states and connects us back to the process of settlement, displacement, and development that is going on even now. We will look at the example of the city of Santa Fe, New Mexico to open up this concept and encourage discussion and reflection.


LAURA NORTON

Norton_Laura.JPGLaura Norton is an artist whose spiritual practice includes weekly creating calligraphic designs which are used in churches across the U.S. and Canada, aiming to visually enliven biblical texts from the lectionary. A professional calligrapher, she works with a wide variety of media to add hand-lettered words to paper, silk, windows and walls. In addition to buses, walls and baptismal fonts around Holden Village, her award-winning calligraphy can be seen on a new mural in downtown Bellingham and in her synod’s Advent Devotional, as well as in the book, Backstory Preaching by Lisa Cressman. Laura is on the board of directors and teaches Calligraphy on Silk at the Grunewald Guild, an art & faith retreat center near Leavenworth, WA. At her home church in Bellingham, WA, she founded and serves as chair of Justice Seekers, working on anti-racism (particularly in the ELCA) and such other justice-related issues as are addressed in the Reclaiming Jesus statement. Laura is an enthusiastic mountain trail runner, a parent to two creative adult children, and is married to a fellow former CPA and appreciator of craft beers. Laura's work can be seen at www.LettersAloft.com and @lettersaloft on Instagram.

Session: Re-formation of WORDS: Literally Lettering as Spiritual Practice
Spending time literally (re)forming words can be a meditative experience and can help to focus the attention on that which is held to be sacred. This session will include viewing powerful examples of words interpreted visually through calligraphy or hand lettering--including the art of the Saint John's Bible and Sr. Corita Kent--and a time of Vision Divina. Demonstrations of techniques for forming and enhancing letters and sacred words such as justice, inclusion, faith, gratitude, mercy, love will be followed by hands-on practice where participants may embellish several pages in a journal which may be used for further personal reflection or class note-taking. The breath and hand movements participants bring to these words inherently bring them to life in ways that are as unique as a fingerprint! "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God and the Word was God." John 1:1

DR. SARAH MAHLER KRAAZ

Kraaz_Sarah.jpgSarah Mahler Kraaz is William Harley Barber Distinguished Professor, Professor of Music and College Organist at Ripon College in Ripon, Wisconsin, where she teaches piano and organ and courses in music history, Women in Music, Music and War, and Music and Art. Dr. Kraaz has researched and performed on historic organs in Italy, Germany, and Scotland, In 2012 and 2016, she taught courses in music and art to American undergraduate students in Florence, Italy. Dr. Kraaz has composed a number of works for organ solo and choir as well as settings of Scottish folksongs, and she writes reviews and articles for The Diapason, an international journal devoted to the harpsichord, organ, and church music. She founded and directed a children's choir at First Congregational Church UCC in Ripon from 1995-2005, where she also served as organist and director of the Senior Choir until 2012.  Dr. Kraaz enjoys gardening, swimming, and reading in her spare time. She plans to retire from fulltime teaching in May, 2019, at which time she looks forward to traveling and promoting literacy by becoming a reading volunteer in elementary schools.

Sessions: War and Music
This course is a survey of music written during and about wars in modern times. After an introduction to war music from the ancient world to the 19th century, we will focus on the Civil War, World Wars I and II, the Vietnam conflict, with an emphasis on American musical culture in each. In class, we will listen to music and discuss the meaning of lyrics and how the cultural, economic, and political environments of each era shaped the music. Larger questions, such as the use of music to manipulate public opinion, to protest war, and even music used as a weapon of war, will be raised and debated.

DR. LAURA HARTMAN

Hartman_Laura.jpgLaura M. Hartman teaches environmental studies at Roanoke College in Virginia. Though she is trained in the study of Christian ethics, her oversized environmental conscience has propelled her toward work on issues such as consumption, food justice, climate change, transportation, ecological restoration, and climate engineering. She lives in Roanoke, Virginia, with her wonderful wife, Anne, and incomparable 3rd-grade son, Theo.

Sessions: The Christian Consumer
Rampant consumerism and runaway consumption may be bad; but what does good consumption look like? What -- if anything -- would Jesus buy? Holden Village is a wonderful setting to contemplate our consumption. In this course we examine consumption with help from several thinkers drawn from the Christian tradition. Our takeaway will not be a list of do's and don'ts, but rather a method of discernment that allows us to move from overwhelm to grace as consumers, citizens, and above all as Christians, in our global, fragile, beautiful world. These sessions are based on a book I wrote, The Christian Consumer: Living Faithfully in a Fragile World (Oxford, 2011).

DR. JUSTIN KIGGINS

Kiggins_Justin.jpgJustin Kiggins, Ph.D., is a Neuroscientist and open science advocate at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative in Redwood City, CA.  Justin’s research focuses on how the brain makes sense of visual processing... how the raw patterns of light that fall on the retina become the meaningful signals in the brain that represents objects, concepts, and ideas. Justin received his PhD in Neurosciences at UC San Diego, where he studied auditory processing in European starlings. He is active in the Open Science movement and online science communication.

Sessions:
Wild brains: Where is that?
Animals large and small need to figure out where things are that they hear. A barn owl needs to dive after a mouse that it hears. A cricket needs to follow the song of a prospective mate. A bat needs to figure out where their echo returned from. This session will explore the ways that diverse animals face similar challenges and how their brains have evolved to solve them.

Wild brains: Where am I?
Whether migrating across a continent or exploring for food, animals need to keep track of where they are. Butterflies use polarized sunlight to figure out which way is north, while rats and other mammals build and maintain a map of their local environment in their brains. This session will explore the diverse strategies that animals have evolved to figure out where they are in the world.

Wild brains: What did you say?
Vocal communication is critical to animals in every corner of the globe. Prairie dogs and vervet monkeys both have symbolic vocalizations they use to warn each other about predators. Songbirds of all shapes and colors and sizes learn to sing their songs & their brains toggle between fipracticefl and fiperformancefl modes. Killer whale pods maintain different dialects, which are influenced in part on what kind of food they hunt. This session will explore the diverse ways that animals use vocal signals to communicate and what is unique and not-so-unique about human speech and language.

DR. ALEXA DOEBELE

Doebele_Alexa.JPGGuest Village Musician
Dr. Alexa Doebele is associate professor of music and Director of Choral Activities at Concordia University Wisconsin, where she conducts three choirs in addition to teaching undergraduate and graduate courses in music education, conducting, and choral literature.  She is a frequent clinician, adjudicator, and guest conductor, and is active as an editor of choral music. Prior to her arrival in Wisconsin, Dr. Doebele served as the Director of Music at Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Wheat Ridge, Colorado.  Her research interests intersect with her faith life through her study of the choral music of J. S. Bach and William Byrd. She is also active as both a solo and choral singer, most recently with Vox Antiqua, an early music ensemble for which she was also the artistic director, and previously with the Milwaukee Choral Artists, the Colorado Conductors’ Chorus, and the Ars Nova Singers.  She completed a bachelor’s degree (double major in vocal performance and German language and literature) at Washington University in St. Louis and her Master of Music Education and Doctor of Musical Arts degrees at the University of Colorado.

June 17-21, 2019

PROFESSOR HAL TAUSSIG

Taussig_Hal.jpgHal Taussig is a recently retired professor and United Methodist pastor.  The most recent of his 14 published books is Re-Reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Loss and Trauma and A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.  His mediography includes The New York Times, Time Magazine, The Daily Show, People Magazine, Newsweek Magazine, National Public Radio, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC, the Bob Edwards Show on Sirius Radio, The History Channel, and the Washington Post.  In additional to speaking gigs around the country and internationally, he is a consultant for his bishop as a consultant in strategic planning.

FR. ROBERT ROSSI

Rossi_Fr_Robert.jpgFr. Robert Rossi has been a member of the Crosier Order for 55 years and a Catholic priest for 48.  He has had a very active and satisfying ministry that has included pastoral and educational services, writing, leadership in the Crosier Order and missionary work in the Congo and Brazil.  Throughout the years, wherever he has been, he has given special attention to Christian formation through teaching, retreats and spiritual direction. He continues to dedicate his time to those services as a staff member of Crosier Village Ministries in Phoenix, where he is known as an innovator and effective minister.  He is now engaged in Christian formation programs and a veterans' ministry called CrossWalk and a 2-yr. training program in Spanish for lay Latino spiritual directors which he himself designed and directs.   His experience has given him a very wide view and appreciation of the Church, as well as a great sensitivity to other peoples’ cultures in Africa, South America, Asia and Europe.  As a Crosier religious, he has been shaped by the spirituality of the Cross to stand by his brothers and sisters who suffer in any way and accompany them to new hope.

Session: Cross Spiritual Exercises
The CROSS SPIRITUAL EXERCISES, inspired by the Paschal Mystery of Jesus, lead a person thoughtfully and prayerfully through experiences of the Cross toward transformation and more effective ministry. The Exercises are comprised of four movements, each of which includes instruction and a reflection exercise that deals with a personal experience of suffering.  The Exercises focus on spiritual growth through suffering and, with the accompaniment of a skilled “cross-coach,” aid the person to face the challenges of suffering courageously. The Exercises help the participant understand and accept the Cross as always giving promise of healing, more abundant life, greater freedom and deeper hope. As a result, the Christian is empowered to better serve the advancement of the Kingdom of God.

DR. JACQUELINE BUSSIE

Bussie_Jacqueline.jpgDr. Jacqueline Bussie is an award-winning author, professor, theologian, and student of life in all its messy beauty. She is a nationally renowned public speaker and much sought-after workshop facilitator. Her first book, The Laughter of the Oppressed (2007), won the national Trinity Prize. Her 2nd book, Outlaw Christian: Finding Authentic Faith by Breaking the Rules (2016) won the 2017 Gold Medal Illumination Award for Christian Living. Publisher's Weekly declared her 3rd and latest book, Love Without Limits: Jesus’ Radical Vision for a Love with No Exceptions (August 2018) "a must read for all Christians interested in inclusivity in their communities." An active servant-leader in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, Jacqueline teaches religion, theology and interfaith studies classes at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota, where she also serves as the Director of the Forum on Faith and Life--the college's interfaith resource center. Jacqueline’s favorite classes to teach include The Problem of Evil, Modern Christian Thought, Religion and Literature, Faith in Dialogue, and Compassion and Hope. Every day she is amazed and grateful that she actually gets paid to do the three things she loves most: 1) interact with incredible students, 2) write, and 3) try to make the world a more compassionate place. In her free time, Jacqueline loves to: read books, ride in the front car of roller coasters, take ballroom dance classes with her husband, and travel to any place she has never been before. She is a huge fan of long walks, laughter, the band Bon Iver, the smell of honeysuckle on a hot day, and her husband’s fantastic fajitas. Her favorite place to write is next to any body of water. Though Jacqueline hails from Florida, she now lives in Fargo, North Dakota—which is all the proof she needs that God’s sense of humor is alive and well.

Sessions:
Becoming Outlaw Christians: 3 Rules Christians Should Break
This workshop is based on the award-winning book Outlaw Christian, by Jacqueline Bussie. In this highly interactive workshop, Jacqueline will share with participants her journey to find authentic faith by breaking the rules. After discussion of the 3 rules Jacqueline believes Christians should break, participants will be encouraged to follow in the footsteps of Jesus and to courageously share their ‘scars’ with one another. After discussing the biblical command to ‘teach one another how to lament,” (Jeremiah 9:20), participants will write and share their own short laments.

Love Without Limits: Learning to Love across Difference in these Divided Times
Do you find yourself longing for practical strategies about how to love across difference in these troubled times? In this session, Jacqueline Bussie will share practical strategies from her critically acclaimed new book Love Without Limits—a memoir and how-to-guide for love across differences such as faith, passport, political party, skin color, and sexuality. Jacqueline will also share the fascinating dramatic backstory behind the book, which was censored by her original Christian publisher for its positive, humanizing stories about LGBTQ folks and Muslims, but then found a new publisher through a viral social media post.

Love Without Limits: Interfaith Peacebuilding & Islam 101
How do we become interfaith leaders and proponents of a love that excludes no one in a world rife with interreligious conflicts? In particular, how do we deepen Christian-Muslim relations and help others to overcome anti-Muslim bigotry in today’s divided world? In this session, based on the book Love Without Limits by interfaith activist and interfaith studies professor Jacqueline Bussie, participants will learn the basic ground rules of interfaith relationships, discuss the contemporary costs and joys of being interfaith peacebuilders, and develop basic literacy about Islam beyond media sound bytes.

DR. JUSTIN KIGGINS

Kiggins_Justin.jpgJustin Kiggins, Ph.D., is a Neuroscientist and open science advocate at the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative in Redwood City, CA.  Justin’s research focuses on how the brain makes sense of visual processing... how the raw patterns of light that fall on the retina become the meaningful signals in the brain that represents objects, concepts, and ideas. Justin received his PhD in Neurosciences at UC San Diego, where he studied auditory processing in European starlings. He is active in the Open Science movement and online science communication.

Sessions:
Wild brains: Where is that?
Animals large and small need to figure out where things are that they hear. A barn owl needs to dive after a mouse that it hears. A cricket needs to follow the song of a prospective mate. A bat needs to figure out where their echo returned from. This session will explore the ways that diverse animals face similar challenges and how their brains have evolved to solve them.

Wild brains: Where am I?
Whether migrating across a continent or exploring for food, animals need to keep track of where they are. Butterflies use polarized sunlight to figure out which way is north, while rats and other mammals build and maintain a map of their local environment in their brains. This session will explore the diverse strategies that animals have evolved to figure out where they are in the world.

Wild brains: What did you say?
Vocal communication is critical to animals in every corner of the globe. Prairie dogs and vervet monkeys both have symbolic vocalizations they use to warn each other about predators. Songbirds of all shapes and colors and sizes learn to sing their songs & their brains toggle between fipracticefl and fiperformancefl modes. Killer whale pods maintain different dialects, which are influenced in part on what kind of food they hunt. This session will explore the diverse ways that animals use vocal signals to communicate and what is unique and not-so-unique about human speech and language.

PROFESSOR CHRISTA OLSON

Olson_Christa.jpgChrista Olson teaches about writing, rhetoric, and visual culture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she is an Associate Professor of English. As a rhetorical historian, Christa is interested in how pictures have shaped values and beliefs and how they prompt us to act. In her teaching and her writing, she uses that focus on pictures to illuminate issues related to nationalism, social movement, and democracy in the Americas. In addition to researching 19th and early 20th century visual culture in Latin America, she regularly writes about news photography for a popular audience on the site Reading the Pictures, and she is at work on a book about photography and the contemporary U.S.-Mexico border.

Sessions:
Photography and Social Justice
What difference does photography make? Most of usd being transfixed by a picture--seeing a sight that horrifies, saddens, or enlivens us. Sometimes, those pictures prompt us to active response. Whether our responses are active or apathetic, though, we still attribute a great deal of power to pictures. We worry that they mislead us, we assume they affect others, and we claim they can make change. This session invites reflection on and discussion of powerful pictures. We will start with historical photographs, especially from the U.S. Civil Rights Movement, and move into the present, aiming to understand how pictures catalyze social change and why they don't always.

The U.S.-Mexico Border in Pictures
Though Donald Trump's promise to build a "big, beautiful wall" inaugurated a new era of U.S.-Mexico border images, the border has prompted picture-making for as long as it has existed. Our era's anxiety is the most recent in a long history of border fears and border looking. The number, prevalence, and power of our contemporary photographs, however, demand attention. What are we looking at when we look at the U.S.-Mexico border? This session will highlight the different ways that photographers have shown the border over the last few years and invite reflection on how those ways of looking shape public conversation and personal feelings about migration, the nation, and social justice.

Looking Ethically
When natural disasters strike, when violence takes lives, when injustice causes suffering, we often first encounter the tragedy's magnitude by looking at photographs. But even as those photographs raise awareness and sometimes spark action, there is a danger to them, an ethical risk well-captured by the term "disaster porn." Does "regarding the pain of others" (as Susan Sontag put it) call us to compassion or does it merely horrify us and so make us feel as though, by looking, we have already done enough? In this global moment when there is no shortage of horrible scenes to view, we need ethical ways of looking. This session invites participants to reflect on and build tools for just, compassionate viewing.

DR. PAUL OLSEN

Olsen_Paul.jpgPaul was born in Wisconsin, raised in Minnesota, and college educated (B.A. history & English) at Luther College in Iowa.  He then earned a Ph.D. in English at the University of Oregon with a dissertation on African American Literature, and he taught English and coached track at Augustana College in Illinois until recent retirement. That's a lot of movement and should include thousands of miles on his bicycle during a summer trip down the Mississippi by boat (with his bike thrown in) from Minneapolis to Missouri.
With two literature courses he initiated the African American studies program at Augustana that eventually became a complete "Africana Studies Major" with courses from several disciplines. He also teaches a course titled "Literature of Faith and Doubt" that  includes writers from many genres and different countries who have found redemption and hope even in the face of spiritual vulgarity and evil. Paul and life partner Jeanne, who was a hospital chaplain for 27 years, have two adult sons living in Los Angeles.  Travel to California for them has become routine!

Sessions:
Reading from David James Duncan's "The Brothers K”
“The Brothers K" (NOT the Russian novel "The Brothers Karamozov") is full of humor--while being profound, sensitive, and insightful. We'll laugh out loud!  We will sigh.  We will cheer!  We will have tears.

Modern African American fiction writers
A look at themes in Frederick Douglass' slave narrative as shared by modern writers Alice Walker in "The Color Purple," and Toni Morrison in "Song of Solomon."

Can poetry, describe our 21st century?  Can poetry help us EXPERIENCE our lives from a new awareness?
Whether it's Wordsworth (English, early 19th century), Frost (American, 20th century), or Mary Oliver (20th-21st century), we can better understand our own "human condition" by just feeling the rhythms and seeing the images of poetry.

LEAH YELLOWBIRD

Yellowbird_Leah.JPGIntricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.
Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

LINDA BREITAG & RAY MAKEEVER

Breitag_Linda.jpgCreative song writers and musicians based in Minneapolis, MN.  They weave fiddle and flute tunes with songs to make you laugh, move, and want to live a bigger life.








KELLY & GEOFF CARLISLE

Guest Village Musicians
Carlisle_Kelly.jpgKelly Carlisle likes to compose, arrange, and lead music for the church. He is currently serving as Musician at St. Mark Lutheran Church in Salem, Oregon where he gets to do all of those things! He and his son Geoff are returning to Holden for their third time to serve together as Village Musicians.  Kelly just retired from K-12 Public Education, having taught high school choir for the first half of his career before becoming a school and district administrator. Kelly is now an Assistant Professor and Director of Administrative Licensure at George Fox University in Oregon. He has always been an avid cyclist and is now trying his hand at raised bed gardening. Kelly and his wife Nancy enjoy trying to keep up with their three grown children and daughter-in-law, and would be delighted to show you pictures of their adorable grandson.

Carlisle_Geoff.jpgGeoff Carlisle was raised in Happy Valley, Oregon, and began playing viola at 11. According to his parents, he chose the instrument for its potential to earn him a college scholarship because "nobody wants to play it." He attended St. Olaf College, majoring in music and environmental studies. At St. Olaf, he enjoyed performing in 35 states, as well as Morocco and Spain. In his senior year, he was selected as the concerto competition winner for the St. Olaf Orchestra. He currently resides in Austin, Texas, where he teaches 8th grade science, is the assistant principal violist in the Austin Civic Orchestra, and enjoys training for triathlons.

June 24-28, 2019

DAVID CAMPTON

Campton_David.jpgA Methodist Minister, currently superintendent of the South and Central Belfast Circuit, and superintendent of the Belfast Central Mission.










DR. NATHANIEL VAN YPEREN

Van_Ypeen_Nathaniel.jpgDr. Van Yperen is Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota, where he teaches courses in Religion and Ecology, the theological ethics of Martin Luther King Jr., and the television series "The Wire," among others. He earned the Ph.D. and M.Div. at Princeton Theological Seminary. He is completing a book on wilderness entitled Promised Land, under contract with Lexington Books. He lives with his partner, two children, and enthusiastic dog in St. Paul.

Sessions:
Re-Formation in the Wilderness
This session explores the relationship between the domestic and wild through the history and ideology of wilderness in America. Together we will explore the development of the wilderness idea in the United States, encounter the works of recent environmental writers, and consider how wilderness can be a paradigm for thinking about justice and responsibility in conversation with the legacies of prophetic leaders, such as Martin Luther King Jr.

JACK JEZREEL

Jezreel_Jack.jpgJack Jezreel received his B.A. degree in Religion and Philosophy from Furman University in 1979 and his Master of Divinity degree from the University of Notre Dame in 1982. From 1983- 88, Jack was a member of a Catholic Worker community, during which time he helped supervise a soup kitchen and three hospitality houses for men and women who were homeless. Jack also became interested in sustainability issues and was involved in organic agriculture from 1985 - 2000. Jack has worked for over thirty years in parish social ministry. For eight of those years, Jack served as the Minister of Social Responsibility at Church of the Epiphany in Louisville, Kentucky where he developed the JustFaith program, a formation program that prepares participants for the work of charity, solidarity and justice, now used in parishes across the country. Over fifty thousand people in over 120 dioceses across the country have participated. Jack is the founder of and Senior Advisor for JustFaith Ministries, which creates and supports formation processes intended to inspire commitment to social mission. He is a popular and well-traveled speaker and teacher, sometimes described as the “Johnny Appleseed” of the U.S. Catholic Church's social mission. Jack is the author of A New Way to Be Church: Parish Renewal from the Outside In (Orbis Press), released September 2018. He lives in Louisville, Kentucky, is married with Maggie, and they have three adult daughters.

Sessions:
Transformed People, Transformed Church, Transformed World
The sessions will explore the linkage between spirituality and action, between personal transformation and social transformation by looking at the Hebrew Scriptures (Session 1), the Gospels (Session 2) and the compelling language of "encounter" that Pope Francis has emphasized (Session 3).  These three sessions will explore the meaning and message of the Hebrew Scriptures, the Gospels, and the idea of encounter (encuentro) made popular by Pope Francis as they relate to the interconnectedness of personal and social transformation.

PASTOR VERlON BROWN

Brown_Verlon.JPG

Verlon Brown works on the streets of Seattle with homeless addicted people. The very people his mother told him to avoid. He also serves as pastor at Central Lutheran Church on Capitol Hill. Before moving to Seattle, he worked with homeless people in Washington, D.C. and then did a stint as Village Pastor at Holden in the early 1990s. He also plays harmonica in a blue-grass band.

Sessions:
Who becomes homeless and why?
An experiential game that explores the unexpected and traumatic life events that lead to 
homelessness.  I developed this experiential game over my 30 years of working with homeless 
people in  Washington, D.C. and Seattle to teach both adults and youth what causes 
homelessness (poverty, addiction, sexual abuse, violence, mental illness, disability, childhood neglect, etc.), how difficult it is to move out of homelessness, and the choices that have to be 
made in order to survive on the streets. 

Racism 2.0
An opportunity to go beyond a simple introduction to racism that most progressive whites 
receive in a oneday workshop, a magazine article, a segment on a TV talk show, or a class back 
in college.  Participants will see just how much racism permeates our history and society. 
Through selected videos and discussion, they will learn that being nice to black people and 
having a black friend is not nearly enough to combat racism.

How to disrupt America's racist system of oppression
Some concrete things that anyone can do to change the system of oppression that dominates our society.
The purpose of this session is to give participants 5 tools that will help them confront racism. We will see racism as a systemic issue and not just an individual issue. Racism is not just 
individual actions but is baked into our everyday lives. We will find our strengths and summon 
the courage to change our world and ourselves with practical solutions and discussion. 

LINDA JENSEN

Jensen_Linda.JPGLinda first arrived in Holden as a child in August of 1951 when the Village was a mining community. Linda has volunteered with museum projects since 1999. Her goal is to help people understand the activities and folks who are part of the 100 plus years of history in this beautiful valley.

Sessions:
Bridging Two Communities
Slide presentation showing the many parallels between the two communities of Holden Mine and Holden Village.

Holden History Early Years    
Three short DVDs with pauses for commentary: ”Forerunners,” the 1961 Work Group, ”Upbuilders,” the 1962 Work Group, “Holden in the '60s and Early ‘70s.”

Miner’s Village Walk
Take a walk through the Miner’s Village with a former resident and learn about life in the Mining days through the eyes of a child.

DR. STEVEN JENSEN & DR. SHIRLEY FELDMANN-JENSEN

Jensen_Steve.jpgDr. Steven Jensen is an advisor and educator in disaster risk management with thirty-eight years international experience and a strong grasp of global trends. His focus on emerging patterns of risk places Dr. Jensen in a unique position to advance how uncertainty and change is addressed. A formative experience for Dr. Jensen was managing refugee camps for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Southeast Asia. Subsequent experience includes firefighting, emergency management, and academic practices in both New Zealand and the United States. Field work has taken him to East Africa, the Philippines, China, Japan, Mexico and El Salvador. Dr. Jensen is a leader on the Scientific Advisory Council for the Red Cross, helping shape their work globally.

Feldmann_Jensen_Shirley.jpgDr. Shirley Feldmann-Jensen has policy expertise at the intersection of disaster risk management and public health. Spanning a range of public health, disaster risk management, and instructional settings, she has both domestic and international experience. The emphasis of her research and didactic work is around policy influences for practice, evaluation and improvement processes. She earned her Doctoral degree in Policy, Planning and Development from the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy. Dr. Feldmann-Jensen also holds a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from California State University of Long Beach, and a graduate certificate in Health Emergencies in Large Populations from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Undergraduate work was at the University of Minnesota. Additionally, she holds several certifications from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Feldmann-Jensen is currently a Lecture and Program Coordinator for the Emergency Services Administration Master of Science program at California State University Long Beach; where she is dedicated to fostering students in the process of synthesizing disaster patterns and building adaptive capacity in the communities they live and work.

Sessions:
Systems thinking, Faith, and Adaptation
Across our country and in much of the world there are some great things afoot and there are troubling trends. We will explore the possibilities and perils through a systems perspective, which enables better understanding of the complex risks humanity faces and how we can be constructive agents of change.

DR. ABBY GOLD

Gold_Abby.JPGAbby Gold is keenly interested in the aspects of culture and society that create environments for promoting health for all individuals, rather than just for the few that can afford to keep themselves and their own families healthy. Abby is Acting Chair and Associate Professor in the Department of Public Health at North Dakota State University (NDSU). Her research focus is in public health, nutrition, communication, and she has a strong interest in the intersection between health and agriculture from a social science perspective. Abby teaches public health to those who are seeking to bridge the gap between public health and health care systems in order to infuse population health principles, primary prevention, and cost savings through disease prevention into the health care system. Dr. Gold is a community engaged scholar, she is actively involved in developing access to healthy foods at a state and local level through the work of the Minnesota Food Charter, the Cass Clay Food Partnership, and the Prairie Roots Food Coop. Abby's colleague, Kathy Draeger, once said that Abby embodies the notion of “community-engaged faculty.” 

Sessions:
Activate and Build Community through Food
Food knits a community together in multiple ways. Food encompasses every wellness element: physical, spiritual, emotional, intellectual, and environmental. This three session class will use an asset-based community development approach to build relationships through food activities and activism in the community.

LINDA BREITAG & RAY MAKEEVER

Breitag_Linda.jpgCreative song writers and musicians based in Minneapolis, MN.  They weave fiddle and flute tunes with songs to make you laugh, move, and want to live a bigger life.








JOHN THOMPSON

Thompson_John.jpgJohn Thompson has a fine arts degree from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He started carving in 1990, making a carousel in Missoula Montana. He is now a printmaker that spends most of his time carving wood and some stone carving. He has been teaching printmaking workshops since 1980, and carving workshops since the early 2000s.  You can see some of his work at www.hobbyhorsearts.com.

Sessions:
Beginning Relief Carving

The sessions will focus on safety, tools, learning a bit about the wood, and hands-on tool use. The sessions will continue with fine tuning designs and carving time.  The sessions will conclude with problem solving, demo of "carving in the round”, how to sharpen tools and the types of tools one might want to purchase.

LEAH YELLOWBIRD

Yellowbird_Leah.JPGIntricate, graceful, thought provoking and prolific – these are all words that have been used to describe the elaborate masterwork of Leah Yellowbird. Originally a traditional bead-worker, she identifies strongly with her First Nations Algonquin-Metis and Anishinaabe heritage. At a young age, Yellowbird learned from her extended family how to follow traditional beading patterns and has been working in this medium her entire life. This knowledge, combined with her creative eye and exploration of color, has spilled over into the realm of painting, and she is now well regarded for her work in all mediums (painting being her most recent). After a rough period in her personal life that involved a death and the end of a relationship, Leah took a break from everything and decided to pick up a paintbrush, something that had been absent from her hand for two decades. The result of this creative time brought significant public interest to her work.

Yellowbird had her first solo exhibition at the American Indian Community Housing Organization (AICHO) in 2013 and has since had her work on display at a variety of prominent spaces, including the Macrostie Art Center, Plains Museum of Art, and the Tweed Museum of Art. She was the Grand Rapids artist in residence from 2015 until 2016 there, her studio was open to the public and she created some of her most popular pieces to date.

Yellowbird describes her process in the context of survival; painting and beading are like breathing to her. She draws inspiration from the traditional art forms of her ancestors while adding a modern voice to the imagery, the result of which evokes a sense of nostalgia and wonder. Her work is a visual manifestation of time, each dot embodying a moment and prayer. Using precision, pressure and symmetry, her pointillistic style leaves viewers humbled and curious – they walk away having seen something they’ve never seen before.

STEVE WOLBRECHT & RON PANGBORN

Wolbreacht_Steve.jpgGuest Village Musicians
While Steve Wolbrecht’s day job is as an engineer for Honeywell Aerospace, his vocation is in music. He is the lead composer for Dead Gentlemen Productions and Zombie Orpheus Entertainment, having scored a dozen feature and short films to date, and routinely serves as a substitute accompanist for Lutheran churches in the Tacoma area.

Pangborn_Ron.jpg

Ron Pangborn has been an active member of the Detroit musical community since the mid 1970"s.  As a drummer, he has toured and recorded extensively with internationally know artists in multiple genres.  Ron is the music director of Hope Community Church in Detroit and produces podcasts and web content for the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Detroit. Along with his wife Pam and daughter Jules, the Pangborns have been coming to Holden for over 20 years as both guests and staff. Let the joyful noise continue!!!






July 1-5, 2019

DAVID CAMPTON

Campton_David.jpgA Methodist Minister, currently superintendent of the South and Central Belfast Circuit, and superintendent of the Belfast Central Mission.








DR. NATHANIEL VAN YPEREN

Van_Ypeen_Nathaniel.jpgDr. Van Yperen is Visiting Assistant Professor of Religion at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minnesota, where he teaches courses in Religion and Ecology, the theological ethics of Martin Luther King Jr., and the television series "The Wire," among others. He earned the Ph.D. and M.Div. at Princeton Theological Seminary. He is completing a book on wilderness entitled Promised Land, under contract with Lexington Books. He lives with his partner, two children, and enthusiastic dog in St. Paul.

Sessions:
Re-Formation in the Wilderness
This session explores the relationship between the domestic and wild through the history and ideology of wilderness in America. Together we will explore the development of the wilderness idea in the United States, encounter the works of recent environmental writers, and consider how wilderness can be a paradigm for thinking about justice and responsibility in conversation with the legacies of prophetic leaders, such as Martin Luther King Jr.

DR. ERIC D. BARRETO

Barreto_Eric.jpgEric D. Barreto is Weyerhaeuser Associate Professor of New Testament at Princeton Theological Seminary and an ordained Baptist minister. The author of Ethnic Negotiations: The Function of Race and Ethnicity in Acts 16 (Mohr Siebeck, 2010), the co-author of Exploring the Bible (Fortress Press, 2016), and editor of Reading Theologically (Fortress Press, 2014), he is also a regular contributor to ONScripture.org, the Huffington Post, WorkingPreacher.org, and EntertheBible.org. For more, go to ericbarreto.com and follow him on Twitter (@ericbarreto).

Sessions:
Believing and Belonging in Luke-Acts
Survey after survey demonstrates that ethnic diversity is only increasing in recent days and yet many of our churches remain culturally homogeneous. What might a church that invites diversity look like? We will turn to the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles to wonder together how God's gift of diversity might take root in our lives together. Too ofter, our tendency has been to imagine that our faith “solves” the "problems" of diversity by making us all one, the same. In contrast, the author of Luke-Acts views our differences as a gift to be treasured not a difficulty to be overcome.

JASON DEROSE

DeRose_Jason.jpgJason DeRose is Western Bureau Chief and Senior Editor at NPR News. He edits stories from Colorado to Hawaii and oversees national coverage of religion, LGBTQ issues, and Native American issues. Before joining NPR, he was a senior editor and correspondent at WBEZ - Chicago Public Radio, where he covered religion and belief. He holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a bachelor’s degree from St. Olaf College. Jason spent many wonderful hours working at his college’s public radio station. Outside of work, he is an overly-active member at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, California, where he chairs the congregation's seminary internship committee. Jason loves reading sad novel but is really quite funny in person.

Sessions:
Religion & Public Life: The Journalist and the Theologian
The intersection of religion and public life is at the heart of many conflicts in American life, from immigration and LGBTQ issues to race relations and reproductive rights. These sessions will examine news coverage of tensions surrounding these topics between and among people of faith, between people of faith and non-religious people, and within individuals. Among the questions we'll address: What role should secular news organizations play in covering religion and belief? What theological role does public discourse play in clarifying and shaping belief and practice? 

LINDA JENSEN

Jensen_Linda.JPGLinda first arrived in Holden as a child in August of 1951 when the Village was a mining community. Linda has volunteered with museum projects since 1999. Her goal is to help people understand the activities and folks who are part of the 100 plus years of history in this beautiful valley.

Sessions:
Bridging Two Communities
Slide presentation showing the many parallels between the two communities of Holden Mine and Holden Village.

Holden History Early Years    
Three short DVDs with pauses for commentary: ”Forerunners,” the 1961 Work Group, ”Upbuilders,” the 1962 Work Group, “Holden in the '60s and Early ‘70s.”

Miner’s Village Walk
Take a walk through the Miner’s Village with a former resident and learn about life in the Mining days through the eyes of a child.

DR. STEVEN JENSEN & DR. SHIRLEY FELDMANN-JENSEN

Jensen_Steve.jpgDr. Steven Jensen is an advisor and educator in disaster risk management with thirty-eight years international experience and a strong grasp of global trends. His focus on emerging patterns of risk places Dr. Jensen in a unique position to advance how uncertainty and change is addressed. A formative experience for Dr. Jensen was managing refugee camps for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in Southeast Asia. Subsequent experience includes firefighting, emergency management, and academic practices in both New Zealand and the United States. Field work has taken him to East Africa, the Philippines, China, Japan, Mexico and El Salvador. Dr. Jensen is a leader on the Scientific Advisory Council for the Red Cross, helping shape their work globally.

Feldmann_Jensen_Shirley.jpgDr. Shirley Feldmann-Jensen has policy expertise at the intersection of disaster risk management and public health. Spanning a range of public health, disaster risk management, and instructional settings, she has both domestic and international experience. The emphasis of her research and didactic work is around policy influences for practice, evaluation and improvement processes. She earned her Doctoral degree in Policy, Planning and Development from the University of Southern California Sol Price School of Public Policy. Dr. Feldmann-Jensen also holds a Master of Public Health (MPH) degree from California State University of Long Beach, and a graduate certificate in Health Emergencies in Large Populations from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Undergraduate work was at the University of Minnesota. Additionally, she holds several certifications from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Dr. Feldmann-Jensen is currently a Lecture and Program Coordinator for the Emergency Services Administration Master of Science program at California State University Long Beach; where she is dedicated to fostering students in the process of synthesizing disaster patterns and building adaptive capacity in the communities they live and work.

Sessions:
Systems thinking, Faith, and Adaptation
Across our country and in much of the world there are some great things afoot and there are troubling trends. We will explore the possibilities and perils through a systems perspective, which enables better understanding of the complex risks humanity faces and how we can be constructive agents of change.

DEBORAH ADAMS DOERING & GLENN N. DOERING

Doering_Deborah___Glenn.jpgDeborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts.  Deborah and Glenn emphasize both experiences and artifacts as they work with communities and individuals, drawing upon Coreforms and cultural Keywords as invitations to interact. Coreforms for DOEprojekts are the zero (circle), one (vertical line), hyphen (horizontal line), tilde (swash) and period (point). These forms are connected through movement. More about Coreforms and Keywords can be seen at: http://doeprojekts.org/coreforms-and-keywords-thoughts-on-invitations-to-interact/

Deborah received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When not working in collaboration, her individual works focus on the relationship of the keywords Nature and Technology, and can be seen at www.DeborahDoering.com. Glenn received his MS in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago. His individual works explore the keywords Biology, Body, and Fashion. He creates unique wearable objects that can be seen at https://www.instagram.com/parlaarte/

Sessions:
“Socially-Engaging Stories and Symbols”

Collaborative artists Deborah and Glenn Doering, along with workshop participants, will read and respond to readings that are “keywords” or “key topics” in contemporary culture. Topics may include the following, depending on participants’ selection: Identity, Body, Community, Country/Nation, Environment, Pragmatism, Taste, and Art (or others that relate to the 2019 theme). After reading and discussing the keyword(s), participants will be offered a number of basic techniques to respond visually to the topic, if they so choose.

DAVID WESTERLUND

Westerlund_David.jpgDavid approaches life and the world with a growing curiosity, wonder, and a posture of "Yes". He savors Ignatian and Jesuit spirituality and longs to enter the Story more each day, sensing the deep, present, joyful Love of Jesus, who calls us Beloved. David lives in Bellingham, Washington and is the founder of BePresentDiscoverJoy. He facilitates improv workshops for non-profits, businesses, schools, churches, and for people who are currently or formerly incarcerated, and in recovery from addiction. His workshops are designed for participants to cultivate presence, discover joy, and build resilience. He believes "that what we practice at a small scale can reverberate to the largest scale. (Adrienne Maree Brown)". David was formerly the Director of Development and jail chaplain at Tierra Nueva – a non-profit ministry that comes alongside incarcerated and immigrant people in the Skagit Valley of Washington State. He absolutely delights in being a father to his sixteen-year-old daughter. And he has discovered that when they are present with each other, they discover joy, and this builds resilience in their cherished relationship, giving them courage for living their lives. For more info: BePresentDiscoverJoy.com

Sessions:
Improv Re-forms us into Present People
Improv Re-forms us into People Who Discover Joy
Improv Re-forms us into People Who Build Resilience
We live in times of increasing uncertainty, isolation, and fear. Gabor Mate says the question is not, "What are we going to do about it?" But rather, "Who are we going to be in the face of it?" How do we re-form ourselves (as individuals and communities) to be resilient people in the face of uncertainty? Applied improvisation teaches us to be present, tune into each other, and support one another. Within the context of play and the vulnerability-support matrix, joy naturally emerges! Because it's embodied learning it more easily globalizes into our whole selves and communities; it re-forms our way of being in the world. These sessions will focus on being present, discovering joy, and building resilience all within an interactive context of foundational improvisation games. Absolutely no theatre experience necessary.

JOHN THOMPSON

Thompson_John.jpgJohn Thompson has a fine arts degree from the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. He started carving in 1990, making a carousel in Missoula Montana. He is now a printmaker that spends most of his time carving wood and some stone carving. He has been teaching printmaking workshops since 1980, and carving workshops since the early 2000s.  You can see some of his work at www.hobbyhorsearts.com.

Sessions:
Beginning Relief Carving

The sessions will focus on safety, tools, learning a bit about the wood, and hands-on tool use. The sessions will continue with fine tuning designs and carving time.  The sessions will conclude with problem solving, demo of "carving in the round”, how to sharpen tools and the types of tools one might want to purchase.

TODD DRAKE

Drake_Todd.jpgTodd Drake is a human rights photographer and social practice artist based in Brooklyn, NY. Originally from the North Carolina, Drake creates art which addresses human rights issues among marginalized communities. Working collaboratively with community members, Drake creates images that are both specific and universal and reveal his concern for the most basic of human rights - to be considered fully human.

Recipient of a Rockefeller Fellowship, numerous Fulbright-Hayes, North Carolina Arts Council, and Department of Education grants, Drake has exhibited across the United States and internationally including exhibitions in Jerusalem, Ramallah, Saudi Arabia and Bahrain.  He has also authored and designed books used extensively in educational setting including Going to Carolina del Norte (design and photography by Drake, authored by Dr. Hannah Gill ), Feeling a Type of Way,  and A Journey Like Us -Getting from There to Here. The latter is used in programing in international high schools.

Sessions:
Let Your Life Speak - Re-formation of personal narrative and self-portrayal
Todd Drake, Human Rights Artist, will share the Quaker practice of Letting Your Life Speak.  Beginning with his own artistic and faith journey, Drake will engage students in activities and discussions that help them define, visualize, and share their own life’s voice. Students will leave create a written narrative and photo collage and the joy of having shared in community.

DR. TOD Trimble

Trimble_Tod.jpgGuest Village Musician
Following work in Greenville, Pennsylvania, as tenured associate professor of music, chair of the department, and director of the college choir at Thiel College (ELCA), I worked for over a decade administering national and international conferences for college and university music faculty. I now serve as organist and director of music ministries at St. Paul Lutheran Church (ELCA) in Missoula, Montana. Initially trained at Millikin University (Decatur, Illinois), I was a student of Richard Hoffland. (Hoffland also taught alongside Paul Christiansen in the Christiansen Choral Summer Workshops.) I later received degrees from the Universities of Denver (Master of Arts, Choral Music), Wyoming (Master of Science, Psychology), and Illinois (Doctor of Musical Arts, Choral Music). My wife, Monica, is a medical social worker. We have three grown children: Claire, a federal court administrator in Portland, Oregon; Grace, a costumer working for Radio City Music Hall’s Rockettes in New York City; and Dan, who works for a florist in Missoula, Montana. 2019 will be the second year I have served for a week as Visiting Musician at Holden Village.

July 8-12, 2019

Dr. Fred Niedner

Niedner_Fred.jpgDr. Fred Niedner is an ordained Lutheran pastor who spent his adult life teaching biblical studies in Valparaiso University's Department of Theology. In his alleged retirement, he does teaching that requires no grading, writes for multiple publications that support the ministry of proclamation, and risks a fortnightly editorial on the Sunday op-ed page of the Chicago Tribune's northwest Indiana edition (Post-Tribune). He and his family have spent time at Holden regularly since 1992, and Fred served two terms on Holden's board of directors.

Sessions:
The Life of Re-

Biblical studies that take up the necessity and role of re-demption, re-pentance, re-birth, re-formation, re-newal, re-surrection, and re-hearsal.  The life of a Christian is a continual process of re-penting of the same old ills, re-learning the good news, re-directing our lives, and re-hearsing the messianic feast.

Rev. Dr. Roger Scholtz

Scholtz_roger.jpgOver the past 25 years Scholtz has pastored four congregations in diverse contexts as an ordained minister in the Methodist Church of Southern Africa (MCSA). He has also served as the interim senior pastor at Hyde Park UMC in Tampa, Florida. He’s passionate about communicating the gospel in ways that bring the scriptures alive for people navigating the challenging intersection of faith and life in our contemporary, ever-changing culture. Scholtz believes that the building of radically inclusive, richly diverse missional communities of reconciliation and hope is a key need for our time. Christ-centered servant leadership, solidarity with the poor, empowering the voiceless, celebrating diversity, non-judgmentalism, compassion for the earth, creative storytelling, laughter and authentic worship are essential values for realizing this vision to which he is deeply committed. Scholtz has a PhD in Biblical Studies, and serves on the faculty as an adjunct at the Seth Mokitimi Methodist Seminary in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa. He is an advocate for the full inclusion of LGBTIQA people within the church, and has been at the forefront of the MCSA’s doctrinal engagement with the LGBTIQA conversation for the past fourteen years. Scholtz is married and has four children (and has the dubious distinction of arguably being the only person to ever go down Africa’s highest water slide in a Carducci suit!)

Dr. Daniel Castillo

Castillo_Daniel.pngDaniel Castillo is Assistant Professor of Theology at Loyola
University Maryland, where he also contributes to the Environmental Studies and Peace & Justice Studies programs. He earned his PhD at the University of Notre Dame in 2014. Dan's teaching and research focuses on the intersection of liberation theology, environmental ethics, and the theological interpretation of scripture. He has published essays in these areas in journals such as Theological Studies, Political Theology, and Scripture. His forthcoming book is entitled: An Ecological Theology of Liberation: Salvation and Political Ecology (Orbis Books). Dan lives in Baltimore with his wife Erika and their two children, Frances and Martin.

Sessions:
For God so Loved the World: Salvation, Liberation, and Care for Creation

What is the relationship between the mystery of salvation, liberation, and care for creation? 
This three-part sequence develops an interpretation of salvation history that demonstrates a positive relationship between the terms in question. Beginning with the theological 
anthropology of Genesis 2 – 4 , we examine hos scripture conveys the view that God creates the view that God creates the human person to be in intimate communion with God,
neighbor, and earth (and how sin disorders this threefold sense of communion). In the second 
session, we explore the ways in which the gifts of manna and law, as well as the voices of the 
prophets, function to reorient the people of God toward the work of serving and caring for 
creation so as to reestablish the person's communion with God, neighbor, and earth. The third 
session examines the creational themes of the gospel of John and draws out an implicit "Final 
Adam" Christology in the fourth gospel. For John, Jesus is the one who restores the threefold 
communion that was lost through "the sin of Adam." In the fourth gospel, the resurrection 
signifies the inbreaking of a redeemed creation.

Dr. Jason A. Mahn

Mahn_Jason.jpgJason A. Mahn is a professor of religion and director of the Presidential Center for Faith and Learning at Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois. He teaches about God, interfaith cooperation, environmental ethics, social justice, vocation, and religious responses to suffering at Augustana, and also frequently speaks at churches and within Lutheran higher education circles.  He has authored or edited four books, including Becoming a Christian in Christendom: Radical Discipleship and the Way of the Cross in America's “Christian” Culture (Fortress, 2016) and Radical Lutherans/Lutheran Radicals (Cascade, 2017).  One of Jason's deep joys is to teach “Creator, Creation, and Calling” to Augustana students at Holden Village  during “J-Term” and join them in building igloos, skiing, and stoking  the furnace called Dante. Another joy is to return in the summer with his spouse, Rev. Laura Evans Mahn, and their two sons, Asa and Gabe, to teach, hike, laugh, and practice living well.

Sessions:
"In the World but Not of It": Christian Good News in a World of Bad News

How might Christians retrieve (and re-live!) the "good news" of biblical texts that are all-too-familiar to many of us? Could we re-view and re-vision them in all their wonderful strangeness? How might we retrieve and relive them in a world filled with the bad news of ecological degradation, the scapegoating of "outsiders," the equation of Christian churches and culture with "white space," economic and white privilege, and violence against enemies, women, and others? This session will lead participants through familiar biblical texts and introduce them to some compelling Christian voices that help us to live faithfully and joyfully  as Christians in--but not of--a world  that is too often filled with bad news.

Dr. Lynn Roger Willis

Willis_Lynn.jpgLynn Roger Willis was born (1942) and raised in San Diego, California. In 1966, he graduated in pharmacy from Oregon State University and married Frances Boltz, of Glendora, California. In 1970, he received a PhD in pharmacology from the University of Iowa, spent 3 years in post-doctoral research training at the Mayo Clinic, and, in 1973, joined the faculty of the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis where he conducted basic biomedical research and taught pharmacology. Lynn received numerous awards for his teaching until he retired in 2006. Lynn and Fran raised 3 children and enjoy 5 grandchildren.
Lynn and Fran have been active members of Pilgrim Lutheran Church in Indianapolis for over 40 years. Fran sings in the choir, Lynn teaches adult bible classes. Both have held congregational offices. Lynn and Fran winter in San Diego and attend Grace Lutheran Church, where both he and Fran were baptized as infants. Lynn also teaches bible classes at Grace.
Lynn still presents lectures on a variety of drug-related topics. He has been a forensic consultant and an expert witness in lawsuits against purveyors of dietary supplements of dubious safety and efficacy.  For fun, Lynn enjoys reading, fishing and woodworking. He and Fran, who is an avid fan of Jane Austen, have lately taken up English country dancing. Fran loves it; Lynn, not so much…

Sessions:
Coming to Grips with the Confusing World of Nonprescription Medications
Walk into any drug store looking for a nonprescription (over-the-counter) remedy for, say, your cold, hay fever or headache, and you'll find yards of racks, stacked 4 or 5 shelves high, offering dozens of products for each and every ailment. These products range from conventional brand-name or generic remedies to dietary supplements, herbal medicines and homeopathic nostrums, each claiming to do for you what no other product can. How do you select the product that's right for what ails you and, more important, actually does what the label claims? Well, that's what this series of classes is all about, and the early answer to the previous question is that selecting the right remedy is actually easier than it looks. Along the way, we'll discuss -- and dismiss -- a few of the more persistent myths about self-medication and medicine in general. We'll also discuss the good, the bad, and the ugly of so-called "alternative medicine," and we'll try to reconcile some of the more confusing and contentious aspects of legalized marijuana, the opioid epidemic and the unexpected attractiveness of "vaping" among young people. By the end of this series, you'll have the tools for selecting nonprescription remedies such that you'll be the one in charge of making the decision of what to buy, not the advertisers.

Jason DeRose

DeRose_Jason.jpgJason DeRose is Western Bureau Chief and Senior Editor at NPR News. He edits stories from Colorado to Hawaii and oversees national coverage of religion, LGBTQ issues, and Native American issues. Before joining NPR, he was a senior editor and correspondent at WBEZ - Chicago Public Radio, where he covered religion and belief. He holds a master’s degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School and a bachelor’s degree from St. Olaf College. Jason spent many wonderful hours working at his college’s public radio station. Outside of work, he is an overly-active member at St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, California, where he chairs the congregation's seminary internship committee. Jason loves reading sad novel but is really quite funny in person.

Sessions:
Religion & Public Life: The Journalist and the Theologian
The intersection of religion and public life is at the heart of many conflicts in American life, from immigration and LGBTQ issues to race relations and reproductive rights. These sessions will examine news coverage of tensions surrounding these topics between and among people of faith, between people of faith and non-religious people, and within individuals. Among the questions we'll address: What role should secular news organizations play in covering religion and belief? What theological role does public discourse play in clarifying and shaping belief and practice? 

Dr. Tim Muir

Muir_Tim.jpgTim Muir is an Associate Professor of Biology at Augustana College in Rock Island, IL with a PhD in Zoology from Miami University (Ohio). As an ecological physiologist he studies and teaches about how the internal workings of animals are both suited to, and influenced by, their environments. Tim's research focuses on freeze-tolerance and energy management in dormant animals. His studies have been published in several peer-reviewed journals and covered by the mainstream press. His current research projects include investigations of tiger beetle cold tolerance and modeling energy use in hatchling painted turtles over a natural nine-month period without eating. Tim uses his broad training in biology to help his students have an integrative view of life on Earth and is equally delighted to talk about small-scale molecular physiology and large-scale global ecology.

Sessions:
Exploring our Summer World
Summer is a time of plenty for most animals - a time to eat and grow and mate and multiply. It fulfills the hopefulness of spring and makes satisfying fall's senescence. But summer's bounty does not come cheap. For some animals, a successful summer is the reward for a frugal winter, whereas for others, summer's main purpose is to provide for the upcoming winter. In this series, participants will discuss a few selected chapters from Bernd Heinrich's Summer World: A Season of Bounty.

Deborah Adams Doering & Glenn N. Doering

Doering_Deborah___Glenn.jpgDeborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts.  Deborah and Glenn emphasize both experiences and artifacts as they work with communities and individuals, drawing upon Coreforms and cultural Keywords as invitations to interact. Coreforms for DOEprojekts are the zero (circle), one (vertical line), hyphen (horizontal line), tilde (swash) and period (point). These forms are connected through movement. More about Coreforms and Keywords can be seen at: http://doeprojekts.org/coreforms-and-keywords-thoughts-on-invitations-to-interact/

Deborah received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When not working in collaboration, her individual works focus on the relationship of the keywords Nature and Technology, and can be seen at www.DeborahDoering.com. Glenn received his MS in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago. His individual works explore the keywords Biology, Body, and Fashion. He creates unique wearable objects that can be seen at https://www.instagram.com/parlaarte/ 

Sessions:
 “Socially-Engaging Stories and Symbols”
Collaborative artists Deborah and Glenn Doering, along with workshop participants, will read and respond to readings that are “keywords” or “key topics” in contemporary culture. Topics may include the following, depending on participants’ selection: Identity, Body, Community, Country/Nation, Environment, Pragmatism, Taste, and Art (or others that relate to the 2019

theme). After reading and discussing the keyword(s), participants will be offered a number of basic techniques to respond visually to the topic, if they so choose.

Rev. Dr. Asa Lee

Lee_Asa.jpgRev. Dr. Lee currently serves as Associate Dean for Community Life and Director of African American Church Studies at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. He has spent twenty years in congregational life as a worship leader, Christian educator, and pastoral leader. He works with churches, and denominational leaders on matters of Christian formation, leadership education and faithful diversity outreach. He earned the Doctor of Ministry degree in Educational Leadership at Virginia Theological Seminary after having earned his Master of Divinity degree cum Laude from Wesley Theological Seminary. He completed his Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education, Magna cum Laude from Hampton University.

Cooper Sherry

Sherry_Cooper_copy.jpgGuest Village Musician
Cooper Sherry got his start on the organ bench, watching with his 7-year-old-eyes as the pastor’s wife played Bach after each service. From there he was hooked, studying organ and choral conducting in college, teaching middle school choir classes in the years to follow, and always keeping a church job so he could do what he loves most. In recent years, he has become a full-time church musician, heavily influenced by the global music of Bread for the Journey and by his wife Sarah, with whom he has begun to write hymns. Yet – he still likes to play a good Bach fugue for the postlude, ideally following a global sending hymn! He currently directs two adult choirs, one youth choir, and three children’s choirs at his church, along with planning and playing two weekly worship services – one which is traditional with organ liturgy, and one which is blended with global music, jazz, and progressive hymns. Sherry and his wife have written over 20 hymns together, and enjoy leading people in song and worship.

 

July 15-19, 2019 Interfaith Dialogue Week

Dr. Fred Niedner

Niedner_Fred.jpgDr. Fred Niedner is an ordained Lutheran pastor who spent his adult life teaching biblical studies in Valparaiso University's Department of Theology. In his alleged retirement, he does teaching that requires no grading, writes for multiple publications that support the ministry of proclamation, and risks a fortnightly editorial on the Sunday op-ed page of the Chicago Tribune's northwest Indiana edition (Post-Tribune). He and his family have spent time at Holden regularly since 1992, and Fred served two terms on Holden's board of directors.

Sessions:
The Life of Re-
Biblical studies that take up the necessity and role of re-demption, re-pentance, re-birth, re-formation, re-newal, re-surrection, and re-hearsal.  The life of a Christian is a continual process of re-penting of the same old ills, re-learning the good news, re-directing our lives, and re-hearsing the messianic feast.

Rev. Terry Kyllo

Kyllo_Terry.jpgThe Rev. Terry Kyllo is a Lutheran pastor serving as the director of Neighbors in Faith. He began this work part-time in September of 2016 and full-time in September 0f 2017. A graduate of the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, he has been a pastor since 1991 and has served in partnership between Episcopalians and Lutherans since 2004. He is the author of two books, Being Human and Apprenticeship. Terry was the recipient of the Faith Action Network Interfaith Leadership Award in 2016, the Interfaith Leadership Award from the Muslim Association of Puget Sound in 2017, the Sultan and Saint Peace award in 2017, and the Muslim Association of Puget Sound 2018 “Inbound Good” award for a non-Muslim who benefitted the Muslim Community.

Imam Adam Jamal

Jamal_Adam.jpgImam Adam Jamal is the Executive Director of Education and Assistant Imam at the Muslim Association of Puget Sound or MAPS in Redmond, WA. He was born and raised in Houston, Texas. He truly believes in the ability of faith to bring communities together. His current focus at MAPS is to help American Muslim youth face the challenges of growing up in a climate of rising Islamophobia. With his traditional training in Islam and a Master’s in Education, he hopes to dispel stereotypes and misconceptions about Islam and Muslims.

Rabbi Yohanna Kinberg

Kinberg_Yohanna.jpgYohanna Kinberg, a lifelong resident of the Pacific Northwest, and a second generation Rabbi. She has served the greater Seattle area as a Rabbi for 15 years. Rabbi Kinberg is a graduate of the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College and currently serves a Reform congregation, Kol Ami, in Woodinville, WA. She is married to Rabbi Seth Goldstein and is mother to two boys, Ozi and Erez.

Sessions:
Abrahamic Tradition and Our Common Future
Rev. Terry Kyllo, Imam Adam Jamal and Rabbi Yohanna Kinberg will lead sessions focusing on interfaith dialogue and introductions to their faith traditions.

Rev. Dr. Asa Lee

Lee_Asa.jpgRev. Dr. Lee currently serves as Associate Dean for Community Life and Director of African American Church Studies at Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington, DC. He has spent twenty years in congregational life as a worship leader, Christian educator, and pastoral leader. He works with churches, and denominational leaders on matters of Christian formation, leadership education and faithful diversity outreach. He earned the Doctor of Ministry degree in Educational Leadership at Virginia Theological Seminary after having earned his Master of Divinity degree cum Laude from Wesley Theological Seminary. He completed his Bachelor of Arts degree in Music Education, Magna cum Laude from Hampton University.

PAstor Matt Gordon

Gordon_Matt.jpgMatt and his wife, Miranda, were married in June 2000 and moved from Texas to the Pacific Northwest. IT was there that they fell in love with the outside work and each other.  Matt has worked in the arenas of youth and family ministry, new church planting, and as a senior pastor. He graduated from Texas Christian University and Pacific School of Religion, He also teaches religious studies at Linn-Benton Community College. They have three children.

Sessions:
Love and Compassion in Eastern Tradition
At their core, all religions teach love and compassion. We will draw on the wisdom of Eastern Traditions to inform our desire to be a more compassionate people.

Jannele Mastin

Mastin_Jannele.jpgJannele Mastin is an art director turned art educator. She is passionate about prompting students to use art as way to investigate and communicate social justice issues and their own identity in Christ. She is also fascinated with the role creativity plays in corporate worship and how these art-filled experiences (liturgical art) shape the imagination and the spirit of individuals and communities. Jannele lives, works and worships in the Kansas City area with her husband and two daughters.

July 22-26, 2019

Rev. Dr. Paul Rohde

Rohde_Paul.JPGPaul is a hiker, camper, cyclist, cook, piano player, and avid reader.  A doctoral project in pilgrimage theology grew out of his love for travel and words--how do we narrate the journey?  His book, And Grace Will Lead Me Home, is a glimpse into that learning.  Favorite pilgrimages include Taize, the Camino de Santiago, Tanzania, the 1994 Lillehamm Paul is a hiker, camper, cyclist, cook, piano player, and avid reader.  A doctoral project in pilgrimage theology grew out of his love for travel and words--how do we narrate the journey?  His book, And Grace Will Lead Me Home, is a glimpse into that learning.  Favorite pilgrimages include Taize, the Camino de Santiago, Tanzania, the 1994 Lillehammer Olympics, and, of course, Holden.   All of this will inform how we respond to change—as individuals and as local and global communities.

He loves teaching at Holden for all the ways wilderness and community open our senses, inform our questions and enliven our imagination and hilarity.  Paul is campus pastor at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, SD and a spiritual director. He is married to Susan, they have three grown daughters and more and more grandchildren.  Some combination of them hope to hike out of the village at the end of their 2019 stay.

Session:
What will shape the future?

The pace of change in this moment is well documented and experienced intensely.  These sessions will explore historical periods that have undergone great change to overhear how communities interpreted and navigated them and explore imagination for our own time.

Dr. Roy Hammerling

Hammerling_Roy.pngDr. Roy Hammerling, a PhD graduate of the University of Notre Dame in Church History, has been a Professor of Religion at Concordia College for over 20 years. His books include A History of Prayer: The First to the Fifteenth Century and The Lord’s Prayer in the Early Church: The Pearl of Great Price. He has written articles and lectured on Martin Luther, the history of Christian Spirituality, religion and fantasy, religion and film, Islam, and religion in modern culture. He travels regularly with students and alumni groups for Concordia College across Europe, Turkey, and Egypt. Likewise, he is a consultant for a documentary film company, Endless Eye Productions (www.endlesseye.com). The documentaries he has worked on range from “Message from the East” about one of Pakistan’s founding fathers, Allama Muhammad Iqbal to “My Country No More” about the Williston oil boom.  He is the co-founder of PACODES (Panyijiar Community Development Services) a local North Dakota non-for-profit organization that works with the Lost Boys and Girls of Southern Sudan (www.pacodes.org).  He is also an ELCA pastor who has served parishes in Pittsburg and Williston, ND in the 1980s. The son of German-Russian immigrants, Dr. Hammerling has been a guest lecturer in Pakistan, Europe, and the USA.

 

Sessions:
Fantasy and Religion: The True Myths of JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis
"Fantasy and Religion: The True Myths of JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis" will look at how the lives and writings of Tolkien and Lewis made them two of the most popular and influential authors of the past century.  Session 1 will introduce the lives of Tolkien and Lewis and how their friendship led them to re-form literature and create stories of wonder and mystery which have resonated with audiences around the globe. Session 2 specifically will focus on Tolkien's view of overcoming evil in the world by means of using stories, which in turn help his readers love God, creation, and neighbor. Session 3 will focus on Lewis's view of Joy as a secret to the meaning of life. 

Dr. Laurence Furr

Furr_Laurence.jpg Dr. Laurence Furr is Cantor at Trinity Lutheran Church, Ft. Worth, Texas. Dr. Furr is also a Certified Clinical Musician and Certified Therapeutic Harp Practitioner and works as a therapeutic musician at JPS Health Network and Vitas Hospice. His Bachelor of Music degree is in Organ Performance from the University of Texas at Arlington. He later received a Master of Music degree in Organ Performance from Texas Christian University. Dr. Furr earned his Ph.D. at The University of Texas at Arlington. His area of study was humanities and music history -- studying ways in which music and art affect humanity and culture. In 2014, after two years of study, Dr. Furr became a Certified Clinical Musician. Continuing with two more years of therapeutic music studies, he became a Certified Therapeutic Harp Practitioner through the International Harp Therapy Program in 2016. He plays the Celtic harp and Native American flute at the hospital in Surgery, ICU, ER, NICU, Oncology, CCU, and other departments. In 2018 he completed his studies to become a Certified Aromatherapist from the New York Institute of Aromatic Studies. During the academic year 1992–93, Dr. Furr was a Fulbright Scholar at the Royal Superior Conservatory of Music of Madrid (Spain) studying harpsichord with Genoveva Gálvez. He has served as Dean for the Fort Worth Chapter of the American Guild of Organists. Dr. Furr resides in Fort Worth, Texas with his husband, Matthew Naughton, a chef with degrees in food science, and their two Cavalier King Charles Spaniels, Mary Catherine and Bella.

Sessions:
Harp Therapy Sound Bath
Come immerse yourself in a "harp and sound" bath which will cleanse your soul through music, mediation, and prayer. Offered by Certified Harp Therapy Practitioner, Dr. Laurence Furr.

Synesthesia, Therapeutic Music, and Meditation
Dr. Furr will discuss the use of synesthesia--crossing of the senses- for creating beautiful melodies and improvisations. He uses anything he can to develop and create these melodies including memory, color, sounds from nature, shapes, and smells, especially the use of essential oils. The class will conclude as participants smell specific essential oils as Dr. Furr plays pieces which were inspired by that particular essential oil. These will include selections from his recent CD entitled “Ylang Ylang.  Class members will be invited to share their own thoughts and experiences and invited to mediate and pray during the closing improvisations.

Therapeutic Music in Healing Services
In the Evangelical Lutheran Worship book, there is a healing service outlined on page 276 in the section entitled Life Passages. There is evidence that certain musical progressions are able to help a person to first soothe and relax, then music to go deep into the soul for contemplation, prayer, and release, and finally music to lift the spirits.Ð'dIreland's ancient harpers had 3 strains of music, called the Suantraighe, Goltraighe, and Geantraighe. Discover how these "strains" can be transferred to the modes of Mixolydian, Aeolian, and Ionian to intensify the effectiveness of healing services and bedside visitations.

Dr. Kendra Mohn

Mohn_Kendra.jpgDr. Kendra Mohn is Lead Pastor at Trinity Lutheran Church, Fort Worth, TX, where she has been on staff since 2010. She has served in a variety of capacities in the Northern Texas-Northern Louisiana Synod of the ELCA, including Chair of the Leadership Development Team, Faculty at the Parish Lay Mission Academy, and Keynote Bible Study Leader at Synod Assembly. She coordinates the John H. Tietjen Speaker Series at Trinity, is a frequent presenter and teacher, and works as an academic mentor for seminarians in the TEEM program, an alternative ordination track for emerging ministries in the ELCA.

Mohn holds a PhD in Biblical Studies from Brite Divinity School at Texas Christian University, where she has also taught courses. Her academic work focuses on how gender, empire, and power intersect in the New Testament. She also holds degrees from Luther Seminary, St. Paul, MN (MDiv), the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (MA-Historical Musicology), and Luther College, Decorah, IA (BA-Cello Performance and Communication/Linguistics). She is a current member of the Board of Regents for Texas Lutheran University. A native of Iowa, Mohn is married to Rev. Erik Gronberg, PhD, Bishop of the NT-NL Synod of the ELCA. They have 3 children and a rescue cat and reside in the Westcliff neighborhood of Fort Worth.


Sessions:
Masculinity, Empire, and the Word
In recent years, masculinity has emerged as an important theme in US culture as well as in theology and biblical studies. In these sessions, participants will learn about concepts of masculinity in the first century Roman Empire (primary context for the New Testament), engage masculine figures in the Gospel of Matthew in light of those concepts, and explore the implications of this dynamic for contemporary individuals and communities of faith.

In these sessions, participants will be introduced to cutting-edge biblical scholarship. While the idea of the Roman Empire as context for the New Testament has been gaining momentum over the last 10 years, the language of empire is still new to many and provides a fresh way of engaging the text. At the same time, issues of masculinity recently have come to the forefront in gender studies as well as in more mainstream discourse in US culture and politics.

Austen Hartke

Hartke_Austen.jpgAusten Hartke is the author of Transforming: The Bible and the Lives of Transgender Christians, a new book on theology and personal narratives published by Westminster John Knox Press in 2018. He is also the creator of the YouTube series Transgender and Christian, which seeks to understand, interpret, and share parts of the Bible that relate to gender identity and the lives of transgender individuals. Austen is a graduate of Luther Seminary’s Master of Arts program in Old Testament/Hebrew Bible Studies, and is the winner of the 2014 John Milton Prize in Old Testament Writing from the same institution. He has spoken at conferences all over the country, including The Reformation Project Conferences in 2014 and 2017, the Philadelphia Transgender Wellness Conference in 2016 and 2018, and the 2018 Why Christian Conference. He also enjoys speaking at colleges and universities, and working with gender-diverse youth and families as the Faith Coordinator for the nonprofit group Gender Spectrum. As a transgender person of faith, Austen's greatest passion is helping other trans and gender-non-conforming people see themselves in scripture.

Sessions:
Reconstructing Community with Our Transgender Siblings
Has someone in your church come out as transgender and you're not really sure what that means? Have you heard about Deuteronomy 22:5, but you're left wondering if that's really the last word on gender diversity? Maybe your church is already LGBTQ+ affirming, but you're not sure where to go from here. This course will give you the language and history you need to understand gender diversity in our modern context, as well as a place to wrestle with your questions. Come explore the biblical texts related to gender identity, find out how transgender people of faith are bringing in the Kingdom, and learn what you and your community can do to help.

Dr. Peter Hernes

Hernes_Peter.pngPeter Hernes is a professor at the University of California in Davis, CA, specializing in river biogeochemistry, but extending more broadly into any environment that contains naturally formed organic compounds. He teaches a range of courses, ranging from hardcore aqueous geochemistry to water quality geared toward non-science majors to graduate writing courses to first-year seminars on environmental poetry and classic environmental literature. As an avid hiker, his interest in the environment is not just professional, but personal. Prior to landing in Davis, Dr. Hernes completed his bachelor's degree at Luther College, his master's and PhD at the University of Washington in Seattle, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of South Carolina. He and his wife have three children, three dogs, three cats, and more than three bicycles.

Sessions:
The climate change wild child – is it nature or nurture?
Climate change is complex, but the individual pieces are not. It shouldn't be controversial.

How many people can live on the Earth?
Our population is growing exponentially but the Earth has finite resources. Are we headed toward catastrophe?

The Happiness Machine
Our world is dominated by power structures, and the nature of these structures dictate our personal lives, our conflicts, our values, and not surprisingly, our impact on the environment. "The Fable of the Happiness Machine" is a parable that lays bare the collateral damage of power, and we will explore several different interpretations of the parable.

Dr. Cynthia Moe-Lobeda

Moe-Lobeda_Cynthia.jpgHolds a joint appointment at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary and Church Divinity School of the Pacific. 










Kai Carlson-Wee

Carlson-Wee_Kai.jpgKai Carlson-Wee is the author of RAIL (BOA Editions, 2018). He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, AGNI, New England Review, The Southern Review, Gulf Coast, and The Missouri Review, which awarded him the 2013 Editor’s Prize. His photography has been featured in Narrative Magazine and his award-winning poetry film, Riding the Highline, has screened at film festivals across the country. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he lives in San Francisco and teaches poetry at Stanford University.

Sessions:
The Journey Within
Leo Tolstoy wrote, “All great literature is one of two stories; a person goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town.” What did he mean by this? What constitutes a journey and what do our own experiences of travel and transformation offer our writing? What do they offer our communities? In this workshop we’ll be looking at the structures of travel narratives, spiritual quests, moral crossroads, inner and outer journeys, and asking ourselves how to develop evocative writing out of our own personal adventures. All writing abilities welcome!

Zach Busch & Leah Bergman

Busch_Zach___Bergman_Leah.jpgGuest Village Musicians

Zach Busch is the minister of Worship and Music at University Lutheran Church of Hope in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where he has served since 2015. Zach is a graduate of Luther College (B/A in music) and Luther Seminary (Master of Sacred Music). Zach takes special interest in exploring how the youngest generations interact with God and finding language for God beyond the established church. He leads music for a millennial church start in downtown Minneapolis and lead music weekly at Luther Seminary. Passionate also about music’s restorative and justice-making qualities, Zach is the assistant conductor the Voices of Hope women’s choir at Shakopee Correctional facility. He collaborates actively around the Twin Cities metro, has toured nationally as a member of the National Lutheran Choir, and music directs musical theatre. Zach writes and arranges music and pursues a number of other artistic and spiritual endeavors that color his work as a church leader.

Leah Bergman is the Minister of Worship, Music, and Children’s Programs at First Presbyterian Church in Iowa City, IA. She received a bachelor’s degree in cello performance and music education from The Ohio State University where she studied with William Conable and Mark Rudoff. She attended Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN as a Master’s of Music student under the mentorship of Paul Westermeyer. While living in the Twin Cities, she performed with various ensembles including singing with the National Lutheran Choir. Since being back in Iowa City she has enjoyed playing with the Iowa City Community String Orchestra, Iowa City Community Theater, and City Circle Acting Company, as well as playing and singing around town and at church as much as possible. When she is not involved in music, Lean enjoys cooking, knitting, coloring, sewing and reading about Laura Ingalls Wilder.

July 29-August 2, 2019

Professor Hal Taussig

Taussig_Hal.jpgHal Taussig is a recently retired professor and United Methodist pastor.  The most recent of his 14 published books is Re-Reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Loss and Trauma and A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.  His mediography includes The New York Times, Time Magazine, The Daily Show, People Magazine, Newsweek Magazine, National Public Radio, the Philadelphia Inquirer, the Brian Lehrer Show on WNYC, the Bob Edwards Show on Sirius Radio, The History Channel, and the Washington Post.  In additional to speaking gigs around the country and internationally, he is a consultant for his bishop as a consultant in strategic planning.

Dr. Patrick Reyes & Heather Wallace

Reyes_Patrick.jpgDr. Patrick B. Reyes is the Director of Strategic Partnerships for Doctoral Initiatives at the Forum for Theological Exploration. He is the first Latinx director of the doctoral initiatives, which celebrated 50 years of supporting scholars of color through fellowships in 2018. He is the author of the book Nobody Cries When We Die: God, Community and Surviving to Adulthood. He presents, lectures, and consults on creating conditions for people of color to thrive not only in institutions of higher learning such as Yale, Princeton, University of California system, and many other Universities, but also in non-profits, private industry, and "think tanks" inside prison. In 2017 and 2018, he was recognized as a "Great Teacher and Preacher," by Children's Defense Fund, alongside civil rights leaders Rev. James Lawson; co-founder of the UFW and Presidential Medal of Freedom award winner, Dolores Huerta; MacArthur Genius Grant and Pulitzer Prize Winning author, Taylor Branch, among others. His current project is building leadership access programs for black and brown young adults who live in "education deserts" in places like California's Central Valley, on reservations, and the literal deserts of the southwest. 

Wallace_Heather_1.jpgHeather Wallace has a passion for stories. She grew up in East Tennessee listening to both her father and grandfathers retelling family stories. At a young age her aunt introduced her to the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough Tennessee and she was hooked. She's now makes an annual pilgrimage to spend three days sitting at the feet of tellers like Carmen Agra Deedy, Donald Davis, Elizabeth Ellis, and Sheila Kay Adams. She considers herself to be an expert listener and a novice teller with a passion for sharing the joys of storytelling with others.

 

Professionally, Heather is a program manager for the Forum for Theological Exploration in Decatur, GA. She provides leadership and support for FTE Grant Initiatives, Discernment Retreats, and the Christian Leadership Forum. She previously worked in high school youth theological programs at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago. While studying for her Master's in Social Justice and Community Development at Loyola Chicago's Institute of Pastoral Studies she supported the Hegeler Carus Foundation. Personally, Heather lives in Atlanta, GA with her spouse Jamie and fur-child of the dog persuasion, Conner. Though raised by a Brethren and Presbyterian, she is a lifelong-Lutheran (Ask her and she'll tell you the story). She is an active member of St. John's Lutheran Church, Atlanta.

Session:
Stories That Lead

How do we come to know, tell, and create the stories that inspire our religious communities to live and thrive? Drawing on their work with national religious leaders and religious communities of color who are in crisis, Reyes and Wallace will lead participants through a practice of storytelling that focuses on the life-giving narratives that nourish the bodies, souls, and minds of leaders and their communities. Through a creative, communal, and poetic practice, participants will each walk away knowing, telling, listening, and reflecting on the stories that can lead, enhancing each participant's ability to lead with empathy and compassion.

Dr. Stephen Volz

Volz_Stephen.jpgStephen's life has been nourished by a dense tangle of Lutheran and international roots. His father Carl was the son of a Lutheran minister and was himself a professor of early church history at Luther Seminary in St. Paul. His mother Lydia was born and raised in India as the daughter of a Lutheran missionary couple who worked in Tamil Nadu for 40 years. Stephen's childhood included extended stays in Europe during his father's sabbaticals, and his undergraduate studies at Valparaiso University focused on European history and philosophy. Stephen's interest in Africa began as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Botswana during the late 1980s, and after teaching social studies at a Lutheran high school in New York City for seven years, he completed a PhD in African History at the University of Wisconsin. The focus of his research is on African responses to Christianity and colonialism, and he has been teaching African history and international studies at Kenyon College in Ohio since 2004. After visiting Holden Village numerous times during the past 30 years, he is delighted to be here this summer again as a teacher.

Sessions:
African Christianity
As the number of church-going Christians is declining in the U.S. and Europe, Africa is becoming the center of world Christianity, with more Christians than any other continent. As Africa has become "Christianized", Christianity has also become "Africanized." How and why has that happened, and what are the implications for Christianity in Africa and in other parts of the world? In an attempt to answer those questions, Volz's sessions will explore three topics related to the growth of Christianity in Africa: 1) translation of the Bible into African languages, 2) establishment of African control over their churches, and 3) the popularity of Pentecostalism.

Dr. Eric S. Eitrheim

Eitrheim_Eric.jpgEric S. Eitrheim, PhD is currently beginning his 3rd year as a faculty member at the University of Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City, OK) working in various areas of environmental chemistry and radiochemistry. His previous work at the University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA) includes characterization of liquid and solid wastes from unconventional drilling (i.e. hydraulic fracturing.) Notably, he explored TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive materials) from flowback water and bit cuttings that are produced in large quantities at each well site. He has previously been to Holden Village as a student at Luther College in Decorah, IA studying Environmental Ethics ad later a summer kitchen volunteer. During the Environmental Ethics class, he met his wife Sarah, who also has fond memories of hiking and fellowship at Holden.

Session:
Scientific Literacy and the long-tern ethics surrounding energy production, storage, and waste
Scientific literacy and misconceptions remain a barrier for advancing environmental ethics, policy, and meaningful progress in responsible energy production. Scientific literacy is not about the general population knowing a specific collection of facts, but rather the method for determining the legitimacy of a data source. The matter of scientific literacy is overarching and not exclusive to individual groups, including religious and political groups. Even our own lack of understanding with what is dangerous to us has grave implications for the way in which we produce, store, and use energy sources.

Chuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman

20170821_ChuckPegImage_JohnNoltner.jpgChuck + Peg are artists and the Executive Directors of Holden Village. They have a shared ministry of reconciliation rooted in community building and shared artwork, a prophetic ministry which has taken them into some of the most intractable places of religious and political conflict around the globe. Through their studio Genesis + Art, they have worked in Belfast, Northern Ireland, as well as Israel/Palestine, India and many communities here in the USA. Their work in Belfast over many years runs especially deep - at the core of their sense of call to the Village to build innovative new programs for Holden in its ongoing process of healing.

Peg worked for the Hallmark Company for over 20 years, leaving her career as a Creative Director of Retail Product Development to come to Holden. Chuck has a Master of Arts in Art + Theology / Missions from Luther Seminary, St. Paul. He was Vice President of Design for a Kansas City design firm and an Associate Creative Director for the Walt Disney Company.

Kai Carlson-Wee

Carlson-Wee_Kai.jpgKai Carlson-Wee is the author of RAIL (BOA Editions, 2018). He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, the Sewanee Writers' Conference, and his work has appeared in Ploughshares, Best New Poets, AGNI, New England Review, The Southern Review, Gulf Coast, and The Missouri Review, which awarded him the 2013 Editor’s Prize. His photography has been featured in Narrative Magazine and his award-winning poetry film, Riding the Highline, has screened at film festivals across the country. A former Wallace Stegner Fellow, he lives in San Francisco and teaches poetry at Stanford University.

Sessions:
The Journey Within
Leo Tolstoy wrote, “All great literature is one of two stories; a person goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town.” What did he mean by this? What constitutes a journey and what do our own experiences of travel and transformation offer our writing? What do they offer our communities? In this workshop we’ll be looking at the structures of travel narratives, spiritual quests, moral crossroads, inner and outer journeys, and asking ourselves how to develop evocative writing out of our own personal adventures. All writing abilities welcome!

Dr. Tim Gustafson

Gustafson_TIm.jpgResident Musician
Tim Gustafson (Gus) is a singer-songwriter who performs solo and in four bands in Minneapolis/St. Paul. He sees music and songwriting as acts of creating not just music but community and solidarity for justice, peace, and care of the earth. He has an MA in New Testament Studies from Luther Seminary and a PhD in English from the University of Iowa. He has been writing songs since he was 15. Gus attends University Lutheran Church of Hope (where he contributes worship music), serves on the board of Lutheran Campus Ministry, teaches Community Education guitar classes, and teaches writing courses at the University of Minnesota. He and his wife, Ann Agrimson, have two adult children, and enjoy canoeing and camping.

Pastor David Nagler

NAGLER_DAVID__Staff75.jpgPastor David Nagler is a born and raised Southern Californian. His degrees are from Humboldt State University, University of Redlands, and Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. He has served congregations in Encinitas, San Diego, and Bend, Oregon. For 2 years, he served in Madagascar in a project that started interfaith dialogue between Christian and Muslim communities. From 2012 until January of 2015 he was the CEO and Pastor for Central City Lutheran Mission in San Bernardino. CCLM is a social ministry of the ELCA that provides housing, food, education, health care, and empowerment for the most vulnerable people in a city of extreme poverty. Currently he serves as pastor at Christ Lutheran Church in Pacific Beach, California. He has twin daughters and is married to Ivy Nagler who teaches yoga and economics for the University of Redlands.

Elisabeth Cherland

Cherland_Elisabeth.jpgGuest Village Musician
Elisabeth is a Lutheran church musician, choir director, singer, violinist, music educator, and former Village Musician originally from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. She has degrees from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, VanderCook College of Music in Chicago, and she is currently a DMA student in the Choral Conducting program at the University of Washington. Elisabeth lives in Seattle with her partner Kent, and two sons (Elijah and Leif). She loves hymns, doughnuts, knitting, leading group singing, and has a new appreciation for sunshine after a Seattle winter.

 

August 5-9, 2019

Glenn Jordan

Jordan_Glenn.jpgGlenn is a public theologian working with Corrymeela, the oldest peace and reconciliation organisation in Northern Ireland. Corrymeela's public theology work exists to motivate and support faith groups to widen circles of relationship, trust and witness. The work is focussed on developing faith-informed practices of reconciliation, inclusion and peace-building, supporting churches and faith communities to respond creatively and effectively to difference. Glenn also has a keen interest in the theology and process of community transformation and renewal and was the creative spark behind the innovative Skainos Square in Belfast, an award winning community regeneration project in the Inner East of the city. He is a Tedx speaker and a writer on evangelical identity in Ireland, and on urban theology and is particularly interested in the power of story to create newness. He blogs on the crookedshore.com, named after the place where he lives and walks with his wife and two dogs.

Rev. Dr. Chris Scharen & Dr. Aana Vigen

Scharen_Chris.jpgChris Scharen is the Vice President of Applied Research and the Center for the Study of Theological Education at Auburn Theological Seminary of New York. His academic research and teaching falls in the area of practical theology; focusing on forming leaders of faith and moral courage to face the big justice challenges of the 21st Century.

 


Vigen_Aana.jpgDr. Aana Vigen is an Associate Professor of Christian Social Ethics in the Department of Theology at Loyola University Chicago.










Katherine & Christopher Chatelaine-Samsen

Chatelaine-Samsen_Katherine.jpgKatie Chatelaine-Samsen is the Pastor of Mission and Outreach at First Trinity and St. Matthew’s Lutheran Churches in Washington, DC. She graduated from St. Olaf College, where she studied Political Science and Religion, and received her M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary. A calling to dwell at the intersection of faith and public life led Katie to build a career in fund development for faith-based advocacy nonprofits in Washington, DC, including Lutheran Volunteer Corps, Sojourners, and the Georgetown Ministry Center. God’s even more persistent call to pastoral ministry led her to serve in two downtown DC congregations, where she seeks to develop their collaborative partnership in mission and outreach to their neighborhoods. When Katie is not at one of the two church buildings, holding office hours in coffee shops, or going to marches with parishioners, she is happiest in running shoes, hiking boots, or exploring DC by bike with her husband, Chris.

Chatelaine-Samsen_Christopher.jpgChris Chatelaine-Samsen is the Associate Pastor for Mission and Young Adults at Georgetown Presbyterian Church in Washington, DC (and is married to Katie!). He graduated from Wesleyan University in CT thinking that he might go into finance. Fortunately, God (and the housing market crash) called him away from that and into ministry. After a stint in youth ministry, he went to Princeton Theological Seminary, and has been in the church ever since. In his church life, he attempts to lead the powerful to encounter the marginalized in the nation’s capital, while also fostering community in a city that can be deeply isolating. He also works for Wesley Theological Seminary, mentoring M.Div. candidates in intentional community and vocational discernment. When not at church, he’s happiest in hiking boots, cycling shoes, or walking with his and Katie’s goofy dog, Kisco.

Sessions:
A Tale of Two Congregations: Congregational Public Witness in the Nation’s Capital
For many, it feels a bit more like the worst of times than the best of times. Work in areas such as creation care, mass incarceration, LGBT equality, and racial justice seem to be routinely thwarted by policymakers from the local to national levels. Issues of justice that the church has advocated around seem at best stalled, and at worst backpedaling.

At the same time, the Church’s call for justice is needed as much as ever, and the public voice of the Church is being heard and reported on (faith leaders advocating for just immigration laws and enforcement are a prime example). Join us for a week of theological reflection and practical discussion of what it looks like when two very different congregations seek to assert a public voice in Washington, DC, and how you can make a concrete impact in your own community.

Dr. Eric S. Eitrheim

Eitrheim_Eric.jpgEric S. Eitrheim, PhD is currently beginning his 3rd year as a faculty member at the University of Central Oklahoma (Oklahoma City, OK) working in various areas of environmental chemistry and radiochemistry. His previous work at the University of Iowa (Iowa City, IA) includes characterization of liquid and solid wastes from unconventional drilling (i.e. hydraulic fracturing.) Notably, he explored TENORM (technologically enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive materials) from flowback water and bit cuttings that are produced in large quantities at each well site. He has previously been to Holden Village as a student at Luther College in Decorah, IA studying Environmental Ethics ad later a summer kitchen volunteer. During the Environmental Ethics class, he met his wife Sarah, who also has fond memories of hiking and fellowship at Holden.

Session:
Scientific Literacy and the long-tern ethics surrounding energy production, storage, and waste
Scientific literacy and misconceptions remain a barrier for advancing environmental ethics, policy, and meaningful progress in responsible energy production. Scientific literacy is not about the general population knowing a specific collection of facts, but rather the method for determining the legitimacy of a data source. The matter of scientific literacy is overarching and not exclusive to individual groups, including religious and political groups. Even our own lack of understanding with what is dangerous to us has grave implications for the way in which we produce, store, and use energy sources.

Rev. Michael Coffey & Rev. Dr. Mark Washington

Coffey_Michael.jpgMichael Coffey is the Pastor of First English Lutheran Church, Austin, TX and Author of Renounce, Resist, Rejoice: Being Church in the Age of Trump. Wipf & Stock. 2017 and  Mystery without Rhyme or Reason: Poetic Reflections on the Revised Common Lectionary. Wipf & Stock. 2015.



Rev. Dr. Mark Washington is the City Manager of Grand Rapids, MI (beginning October 2018) Previously until September 2018 he was the Pastor of Vision of Hope African Methodist Episcopal Church, Austin TX and Assistant City Manager, Austin TX

Sessions:
The Ephesians 4 Project: Congregations and Interracial Fellowship
The presenters will lead sessions based on their shared experience of leading their congregations since 2015 in intentional interracial fellowship. Ephesians 4 will form the biblical basis for exploring theological, social, and spiritual issues of living as the body of Christ in diversity and unity.

The church reflects and enables the ongoing racial divisions in American society. Many congregations and denominations are racially segregated. One way to witness to the Gospel and work against racism is for congregations to enter into intentional fellowship with other congregations of different traditions and racial makeup. While denominations conduct studies and develop programs to address racism in the church, which often go on for years with little impact, local congregations can act now take bold steps in living as church together.

Elizabeth Austen

Austen_Elizabeth.jpgAs the Washington State Poet Laureate for 2014-16, Elizabeth Austen traveled to all of the state's 39 counties, offering writing workshops and giving readings. Her collection Every Dress a Decision (Blue Begonia Press, 2011) was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. She’s also the author of two chapbooks, The Girl Who Goes Alone (Floating Bridge Press, 2010) and Where Currents Meet (Toadlily Press, 2010). Her poems have been featured on The Writer’s Almanac and Verse Daily, in the Los Angeles Review, Bellingham Review and Willow Springs. She has been featured at Poets House in New York City, Minneapolis's The Loft, the Skagit River Poetry Festival, Spokane's Get Lit!, Seattle's Cheap Wine and Poetry and Bumbershoot, among others. Elizabeth produces poetry programming for NPR-affiliate KUOW 94.9 and earned an MFA at Antioch University Los Angeles. She makes her living at Seattle Children’s Hospital, where she also offers poetry and journaling workshops for the staff.

Jourdan Keith

Keith_Jourdan.jpgJourdan Imani Keith is a contributing writer for Orion Magazine. Her TEDx Talk "Your Body of Water" is the theme for King County's 2016-2017 Poetry on Buses program.  Her essays, "Desegregating Wilderness" and "At Risk" appear in the 2015 Best American Science and Nature Writing Anthology (Houghton Mifflin). Her ekphrastic poems and stories featured at the Northwest African American Museum in 2015 as part of the Glass Orchidarium exhibit and at the Seattle Art Museum's REMIX in November 2015.  A storyteller in the Griot tradition, she has been awarded fellowships from Wildbranch, Santa Fe Science Writing workshop, VONA, Hedgebrook, and Jack Straw. As Seattle Public Library’s first naturalist-in-Residence she designed "Natural Literacy," linking environmental and early childhood literacy. She continues her service to community as a Seattle Poet Populist Emeritus and received awards from University of Washington, Artist Trust, 4Culture and Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Keith’s essay collection, Tugging at the Web is forthcoming from University of Washington Press.

Andrea Sorum & Conie Borchardt

Sorum_Andrea.jpgGuest Village Musicians
Andrea Sorum serves at United Seminary of the Twin Cities as Chapel and Music Coordinator and leads KOR, a weekly interfaith sacred song circle/choir. She brings people of all backgrounds together with new, original and ancient songs taught in the oral tradition. The songs become prayers in action as they create community and harmony for that moment.
She resists the patriarchy and seeks justice in quiet ways like raising two elementary-aged sons who know how to compost and clean and in loud ways like leading songs at marches, protests and community meetings. She loves hiking, comedy, yoga and live music.

borchardt_conie1.jpgConie Borchardt (she/her or they/them) is a listener, a vibration, and a heartist working for personal healing and collective liberation.  A Gen X-er born to new and old immigrants from Europe and Asia on land first familiar to the Dakota nation and now known as Minnesota, Conie is curious about the influences that form and inform us and telling the stories of where we've been and where we are going.

Using sound and song, movement and dance, mindfulness and listening, meditation and ritual, Conie helps individuals and groups center themselves in their present reality and lovingly transforms Pain and Possibility into Power and Progress.  Conie is a Full Voice Framework™ coach, Dances of Universal Peace Leader, presenter with Music that Makes Community, spiritual director, labyrinth designer and facilitator, Interplay enthusiast, and visual artist. 

As a church musician, she stands with the Lutheran choral and organ tradition under her feet and steps forward at St. Mary's Episcopal Church and dinner church Table 229 in St. Paul, MN, to bring community together in meaningful ways with aural tradition song leading skills, an interest in embodied prayer practices, and weaving various musical styles.

August 12-16, 2019

Glenn Jordan

Jordan_Glenn.jpgGlenn is a public theologian working with Corrymeela, the oldest peace and reconciliation organization in Northern Ireland. Corrymeela's public theology work exists to motivate and support faith groups to widen circles of relationship, trust and witness. The work is focused on developing faith-informed practices of reconciliation, inclusion and peace-building, supporting churches and faith communities to respond creatively and effectively to difference. Glenn also has a keen interest in the theology and process of community transformation and renewal and was the creative spark behind the innovative Skainos Square in Belfast, an award-winning community regeneration project in the Inner East of the city. He is a Tedx speaker and a writer on evangelical identity in Ireland, and on urban theology and is particularly interested in the power of story to create newness. He blogs on the crookedshore.com, named after the place where he lives and walks with his wife and two dogs.

Karen Peters

Peters_Karen.JPGKaren Peters, M.Div., is a Senior Rosen Method Movement Teacher Trainer and an Alexander Technique Teacher. Having studied and taught Environmental and Feminist/Womanist Christian Ethics in her early adulthood, she realized that her interest in Earth and Embodiment ethics needed to be grounded in her body and her work, not just read, taught, and written about. So she embarked in an experiential education (via the Alexander Technique and Rosen Method) which deeply explored how we inhabit our bodies, and how our interactions with ourselves, each other and the world can come out of what are largely unconscious, uninhabited bodies. Alternatively, exploring how we inhabit our bodies can be an endless source of self-discovery, wholeness, and connection. Karen is Director of Rosen Method Movement at the Rosen Method Institute of Canada, and also teaches in Napa, the San Francisco/Bay Area, and Mexico City. She lives in Napa, CA, with her husband and two sons.

Sessions:
Embodied Awareness through Movement

In a Rosen Movement class, simple, range-of-motion movements teach us where and how our bodies are designed to move. The movements also help us discover patterns of tension and habits of movement that have been causing us pain or limiting our potential and give us the possibility and choice to move more freely. In the process, we breathe more freely, find better balance, increase mobility, lubricate the joints, and just plain feel better. And doing all this with embodied awareness deepens our connection to ourselves and our feeling of aliveness. Rosen Method Movement classes are for people of all kinds of abilities, and are particularly treasured in older populations; physical therapy based movements done with musical accompaniment are preventative as well as restorative, and facilitate each individual person's learning to move in their own particular body with freedom, presence, self-compassion, and ease.

Dr. Jakob Karl Rinderknecht

Rinderknecht_Jakob.jpgJakob Karl Rinderknecht is the Director of the Pastoral Institute at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. As a specialist in Christian ecumenism and theological anthropology, he uses insights gathered from the field of cognitive linguistics in order to understand how communities shape (and limit) the possibilities of thought through language, ritual, and metaphor — and how they transcend those differences in dialogue with others. His most recent book, Putting God on the Map: Theology and Conceptual Mapping (Fortress, 2018), introduces readers to recent research into how human embodiment shapes language at its deepest levels, and how attending to these realities reshapes theology. In addition to theologizing, he is an avid baker and sewer, and plays a number of instruments, including several forms of bagpipes. Jakob spent the year of 2002-03 at Holden, where he worked as the village potter and in the kitchen.

Sessions:
How to Think, Pray, and Dialogue as an Embodied Being
Human embodiment is absolutely pervasive to our experience. And yet, it is usually invisible to us unless something is going wrong. In this three-part session, we will explore how human embodiment shapes our engagement with the world, ourselves, and each other. Session one will provide an introduction to ways in which our very thinking is shaped by our bodies. Session two will delve into how embodiment shapes our engagement with the religious, including through ritual and sacraments. Session three will draw out implications for this embodiment in our engagement with people who are different from us, and who may inhabit different cultures, languages, worldviews, than us.

Rev. Erik Samuelson & Annemarie Russell

Samuelson_Erik.jpgRev. Erik Samuelson is a minister of Word and Sacrament in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and a Coach with Vibrant Faith. He has been working in the area of vocational discernment and spiritual formation (particularly in intergenerational and multi-racial communities that engage young adults) for over 10 years. Erik is the founder of “Come Alive Coaching” which offering coaching, workshops, practices, and resources to individuals and communities looking to deepen their sense of vocation and spiritual formation. www.eriksamuelson.com

Russell_Annemarie.jpgAnnemarie Russell is a writer, singer/songwriter, and English teacher whose vocation is helping others give voice to their own stories. She is also a practitioner in the art of accompanying people in vocational discernment and spiritual discovery. Annemarie brings her authenticity and optimism to the work of story sharing, artistic expression and spiritual formation as she seeks to live deeply into the intersection of faith, art and story through her teaching and songwriting. Annemarie lives in the greater Seattle area with her husband and three children. www.annemarierussell.com

Sessions:
The Art of Christian Discernment: Clearness Practice
The “Religious Society of Friends” (also known as “Quakers”) have at the heart of their common life a spiritual practice known simply as “clearness.” Clearness central to how Quakers worship, do community business, and make decisions. In recent years, Christians (and non-Christians) have rediscovered this practice and are finding that it adds a richness to their lives as individuals and in community. Clearness is a practice of gathering in community, convening and holding a holy space, allowing for long periods of silence, and listening for the voice of the Holy Spirit, the “inner teacher,” to speak to individuals and to the community as a whole. Out of the silence, this voice emerges from members the community to discern the will of God, speak truth, and bring a communal wisdom greater than an individual could possess. When a member of the community struggles with a challenge or decision that could benefit from the practice of clearness, a “Meeting for Clearness” or “Clearness Committee” can be convened, with that person’s challenge at the center.

Hallie Parkins

Parkins_Hallie.jpgResident Musician
Cellist Hallie Parkins is an avid performer, collaborator, and advocate for social justice. In 2014, she completed her undergraduate studies at Oberlin Conservatory, where she studied with Darrett Adkins. She also completed a Bachelors of Arts at Oberlin College, studying feminist and womanist religion. She grew up studying with Richard Treat at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. As an orchestral musician, Hallie has performed in concerts with the Berkeley Symphony, Oberlin Orchestra, and Oberlin Chamber Orchestra. She also plays with chamber groups around the bay area. Hallie is currently in her third year of seminary at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary. She has played in worship settings at St. Gregory’s Cathedral, University Lutheran Chapel and in interfaith services. After completing her undergraduate studies, Hallie spent a summer in Ghost Ranch on college staff where she performed weekly concerts on the trail to Chimney Rock.

Joe Davis & David Scheer (AGAPE)

Davvis_Joe___AGAPE.jpgJoe Davis is a nationally touring writer, speaker, and performer based in Minneapolis, MN. He is the frontman of emerging soul, funk, and spoken word ensemble, The Poetic Diaspora, and the co-founder/Artistic Director of H-Cubed: Harrison, Healing, Harmony; a monthly event series centered on healing through the arts. As a student and educator, he has served as a teaching artist at dozens of high schools and universities and most recently as the Artist-in-Residence at Luther Seminary, receiving a masters in Theology of the Arts.

Combining rapping, dancing, storytelling and his fluency in Spanish, AGAPE* connects with his 
listeners in a way that they really "get it". His energy is contagious, and his stories of faith 
transcend differences. Nationally acclaimed, he performs 100 times year for youth across the 
United States and has also traveled internationally with his ministry Hip Hop Outreach.  Dave is a Gustavus and Luther graduate and also serves as the Contextual Learning Coordinator for Luther Seminary.  Dave is an IDI qualified administrator and a catalyst
trainer of the Kaleidoscope Institute.

Sessions:
The R2 (Reformation Remix): An artistic exploration of race and faith in our church and world 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said that Sunday morning was the most segregated hour in America. How do we find ways to be the church together and celebrate the diversity of God’s kingdom? Poet Joe Davis and Rapper David Scherer (AGAPE*) facilitate a interactive session of personal storytelling, inspiring music/poetry, and intercultural practices that will be good conversation starters for your congregation or community about issues of race & faith.

Rev. Kirsten Laderach

Laderach_Kirsten.jpgKirsten is a minster of word and sacrament with the ELCA. She is currently living and working in Madagascar as the Country Coordinator for YAGM (Young Adults in Global Mission), a program of the ELCA. I arrived in March of 2015. Kirsten lives in Antananarivo, the country’s capital and travels throughout the island supporting the young adult volunteers and the work of church accompaniment. Prior to this call, she worked in Stockton, California as a Pastor at Zion Lutheran Church. While there, Kirsten and the congregation and worked to incorporate visual and musical arts into our ministries, worship, outreach and even the physical space.

She received the Graduate Preaching Fellowship from Luther Seminary upon graduation in May 2011 and traveled for a year in India, South Africa and Israel/Palestine. That year was a year of experientially studying wealth and poverty, racial divisions and religious pluralism and strife. Specifically, she studied Dalit Theology, Post-Apartheid/Apartheid in South Africa and walked the bible and crossed religious boundaries in Israel/Palestine. Theologically she is interested in healing and forgiveness, wholeness, resurrection and inclusion. She believes prayer and community are at the heart of all of these beautiful realities and possibilities. Her work in Madagascar keeps her focused on the need to include women in all offices of the church and society.

John Noltner

Noltner_John.jpgJohn is a Minnesota-based photographer. For 25 years he has made images for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. In 2009 he founded A Peace of My Mind, a multimedia arts project that explores our common humanity through portraits and storytelling as he asks people from across the country to consider the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?”



Paul Vasile

Vasile_Paul.jpgGuest Village Musician
Paul Vasile is a freelance church musician, consultant, and composer based in New York City. A multi-talented musician and dynamic worship leader, he is committed to building, renewing, and re-shaping faith communities through music and liturgyPaul brings over twenty-five years of ministry experience to his work as a consultant, workshop facilitator, and teacher. He is excited to help congregations broaden their repertoire of sung prayer and praise, and to demonstrate how participatory music and liturgy can energize and unify worshipers from varied backgrounds, cultures, and traditions. His skills and background make him a unique resource to congregations in transition, or those experiencing anxiety or conflict in their worship life.

 

As the Executive Director of Music that Makes Community, Paul is passionate about modeling and sharing leadership practices that sustain the musical and spiritual life of faith communities. He provides support and resources to an international network of leaders committed to practices of paperless (oral tradition) singing, grounded in a theology of welcome and generosity.  Paul is also a prolific composer of sacred music in a range of style and genres. His music is represented in Glory to God, the newest hymnal of the Presbyterian Church (USA), and he has written extensively for St. Lydia’s and Not So Churchy, innovative, justice-centered faith communities in New York City.

August 19-23, 2019

Allison Gray

Gray_Allison.jpgAllison Gray teaches New Testament and Early Christian Literature to undergraduate and graduate students at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, TX. She completed her doctoral work at the University of Chicago, writing a dissertation about how the fourth-century theologian Gregory of Nyssa used biography as a teaching tool to guide his readers toward lives of Christian virtue. In her current research, Allison continues to explore the relationship between literature and a community's education (intellectual, emotional, spiritual). Her own voracious reading habits have turned her into a lifelong learner. In her spare time, Allison can be found devouring young adult fiction and knitting intricate wool socks that are entirely inappropriate for the Texas heat.

Sessions:
Re-forming the Household of God: Slaves of Christ Jesus

In this session, participants will examine the complex and troubling metaphor "slaves of Christ Jesus" as it is used in a number of New Testament writings to describe fellowship in the household of God. Together we will analyze what and how the metaphor of slavery signified for early Christ-believers. Additionally, we'll consider how the historical realities of slavery, ancient and modern, continue to shape and complicate contemporary Christian understandings of what it might mean to be a "slave of Christ Jesus." How should Christian commitments to human dignity, justice, and equity continue to re-form our reading of metaphors for belonging in the household of God?

Re-forming the Household of God: Children and Childhood
In this session, participants will explore how the metaphor of "childhood" is used in various NT texts to signify belonging in the community of Christ-believers and to capture our human potential for spiritual development. By examining the real experiences of first-century children and what we expect of children in the contemporary world, we will begin to assess the challenges and opportunities linked to the NT image of being a child in God's household. How should Christian commitments to human dignity, justice, and equity continue to re-form our reading of metaphors for belonging in the household of God?

Re-forming the Household of God: Athletes and Soldiers
In this session, participants will explore how athletic and martial metaphors are used in various NT texts to signify belonging in the community of Christ-believers and to encourage excellence in virtue. By examining the real experiences of first-century athletes and soldiers alongside the experiences of their counterparts in the contemporary world, we will begin to assess the challenges and opportunities linked to the NT image of being an athlete and soldier in God's household. How should Christian commitments to human dignity, justice, and equity continue to re-form our reading of metaphors for belonging in the household of God?

Dr. Jakob Karl Rinderknecht

Rinderknecht_Jakob.jpgJakob Karl Rinderknecht is the Director of the Pastoral Institute at the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. As a specialist in Christian ecumenism and theological anthropology, he uses insights gathered from the field of cognitive linguistics in order to understand how communities shape (and limit) the possibilities of thought through language, ritual, and metaphor — and how they transcend those differences in dialogue with others. His most recent book, Putting God on the Map: Theology and Conceptual Mapping (Fortress, 2018), introduces readers to recent research into how human embodiment shapes language at its deepest levels, and how attending to these realities reshapes theology. In addition to theologizing, he is an avid baker and sewer, and plays a number of instruments, including several forms of bagpipes. Jakob spent the year of 2002-03 at Holden, where he worked as the village potter and in the kitchen.

Sessions:
How to Think, Pray, and Dialogue as an Embodied Being
Human embodiment is absolutely pervasive to our experience. And yet, it is usually invisible to us unless something is going wrong. In this three-part session, we will explore how human embodiment shapes our engagement with the world, ourselves, and each other. Session one will provide an introduction to ways in which our very thinking is shaped by our bodies. Session two will delve into how embodiment shapes our engagement with the religious, including through ritual and sacraments. Session three will draw out implications for this embodiment in our engagement with people who are different from us, and who may inhabit different cultures, languages, worldviews, than us.

Laura Reed

Reed_Laura.jpgComing of age during the Cold War era, Laura Reed spent her early career working with scientists and activists to reduce reliance on military force and the threats of nuclear war. She received her PhD from MIT, studying with scientists and political scientists. Her research interests include U.S. national security policy; implications of globalization for peace and security; nuclear security, nonproliferation, and disarmament initiatives; emerging norms of humanitarian intervention and collective responses to transnational problems.

Sessions:
Lives of Commitment: Re-Forming Visions of Social Change
What does it take to sustain a life of commitment that makes positive social change?  Many of us have experienced injustice or hardships that motivate us to challenge the status quo. Yet often we feel powerless in the face of forces beyond our control. This 3-part workshop identifies and develops a model of social change that draws upon the lives and stories of individuals in our community.

We are sometimes taught that it takes a trailblazer, genius or a millionaire to make a difference. But Holden Village is founded and sustained by a loose community that have pursued a life of commitment. What are the insights and lessons that we might draw upon from our experience at Holden Village?

Joe Davis & David Scheer (AGAPE)

Davvis_Joe___AGAPE.jpgJoe Davis is a nationally touring writer, speaker, and performer based in Minneapolis, MN. He is the frontman of emerging soul, funk, and spoken word ensemble, The Poetic Diaspora, and the co-founder/Artistic Director of H-Cubed: Harrison, Healing, Harmony; a monthly event series centered on healing through the arts. As a student and educator, he has served as a teaching artist at dozens of high schools and universities and most recently as the Artist-in-Residence at Luther Seminary, receiving a masters in Theology of the Arts.

Combining rapping, dancing, storytelling and his fluency in Spanish, AGAPE* connects with his 
listeners in a way that they really "get it". His energy is contagious, and his stories of faith 
transcend differences. Nationally acclaimed, he performs 100 times year for youth across the 
United States and has also traveled internationally with his ministry Hip Hop Outreach.  Dave is a Gustavus and Luther graduate and also serves as the Contextual Learning Coordinator for Luther Seminary.  Dave is an IDI qualified administrator and a catalyst
trainer of the Kaleidoscope Institute.

Sessions:
The R2 (Reformation Remix): An artistic exploration of race and faith in our church and world 
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said that Sunday morning was the most segregated hour in America. How do we find ways to be the church together and celebrate the diversity of God’s kingdom? Poet Joe Davis and Rapper David Scherer (AGAPE*) facilitate a interactive session of personal storytelling, inspiring music/poetry, and intercultural practices that will be good conversation starters for your congregation or community about issues of race & faith.

Mel Jacob

Jacob_Mel.jpgOrdained in 1974, Mel was the 7th pastor of an 18 year old S.C. “mission” congregation.  In 7 years & growth, it became self-supporting.  Seeing ministry opportunities nearby at the US Army Reserve Center, a 30-year military career unfolded.  His successes “For God and Country” included:  Rank of Colonel & prestigious awards as The Meritorious Service Medal, the prized Legion of Merit, and ELCA’s Meritorious Service Medallion.

With 5-Quarters C.P.E., Mel accepted a V. A. chaplaincy position.  There, he became an Assistant Clinical Professor with the Department of Psychiatry--Medical College of GA.  Mel was the Chaplain of the V.A.’s 1st Vietnam Vets Ward, a noted MCG Grand Rounds speaker, & a first published author on pastoral care of Vietnam vets & PTSD.

Mel is mostly identified as the Founder/Developer/Executive Director of Lutheran Counseling Services (LCS).  With his shepherding LCS became an ELCA-SMO, a LCMS-RSO, FL 501C-3, & a unique AAPC Service Center in Lutheran Services in America (receiving LSA’s Award for Excellence). With a dedicated staff, tens of thousands from all life & community spectrums were served with FL licensed mental health treatment & educational services.  In 25 years, Mel developed professional contracts & worker care services to eight FL based judicatories (including 500 clinical evaluations).  He was a consultant for congregational & agency health and continues to be a sought-after preacher/speaker & workshop leader. Mel’s credentials include FL Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist, Diplomate-AAPC, Approved Supervisor-AAMFT, and FL LMFT & LMHC Supervisor.   Personal awards included Distinguished Alumnus from Concordia University, Austin, TX., Distinguished Service Award (AAMFT) in Central FL., and ELCA’s Domestic Mission’s ‘Christus in Mundo Award’ (2016). Mel is blessed with 45-year marriage (Mary) & two daughters/sons-in-law (grandchildren 6, 3, & 1) who are building lives around human & community health care in Seattle.

Sessions:
 “Re-forming…a Time for Everything under Heaven”
Flux is constant.  Change and loss happen.  Emotions swirl.  Sometimes ambiguity arises around the loss with lack of clarity, confused meaning, and a hazy way forward.   We absorb, much less embrace, only so much at ‘a Time.’ Using the research of Pauline Boss and the backdrop of Ecclesiastes 3, we explore two types of ambiguous loss.  These will be explained and examined with the pitfalls and possibilities associated with six helpful goals to re-form this ‘season of life.’  With goals of resiliency and personal growth we live in hope.  We are in ‘it’ together.

Amanda Weber

Weber_Amanda.jpgGuest Village Musician
Recognized by the Yale Institute of Sacred Music as a conductor “of exceptional promise and 
achievement,” Amanda Weber is passionate about uniting music, art and community through her work as an artist and collaborator. Weber's recent focus has been the Voices of Hope, a women’s prison choir at the Minnesota 
Correctional Facility in Shakopee.  Founded by Weber in October 2015, the choir has grown from 15 to 50 singers and collaborated with over 200 musicians from the Twin Cities metro area. Weber’s interest in using music as a tool for social justice grew through her work at Luther Place Memorial Church in Washington, DC, where she founded Bethany’s Women of Praise, a choir for homeless women, in 2008. In addition to her work with marginalized populations, Weber is active as a conductor, singer, pianist, and composer.  She currently serves as the Interim Director of Choral Ministries at Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis.  
Weber received a Doctorate of Musical Arts from the University of Minnesota in 2018, a Masterof Music Degree in Choral Conducting at the Yale School of Music and Institute of Sacred Music in 2013, and a BA in Music and Art at Luther College in 2008.

August 26-30, 2019

Howard-Brook_Wes_and_Ferguson_Johnson_Sue.jpgWes Howard-Brook & Sue Ferguson Johnson

Wes Howard-Brook has been teaching, writing and living at the intersection of church, academy and the world since 1988. After a career as an attorney for the US federal government and Washington state governments, Wes left law practice in 1985 to earn a Master of Divinity degree at Seattle University. He has been teaching Bible and theology at Seattle University since 2003.

He has written, co-written or co-edited seven books, including two on the Gospel of John: Becoming Children of God: John’s Gospel and Radical Discipleship and John’s Gospel and the Renewal of the Church.  He is co-author of Unveiling Empire: Reading Revelation Then and Now. Wes’ recent project is the two-volumes Come Out, My People!: God’s Call Out of Empire In the Bible and Beyond. and Empire Baptized: How “Christianity” Embraced What Jesus Rejected, 2nd-5th Centuries. He has also written for numerous publications, including Sojourners, The Other Side, Tikkun Daily, and several Catholic Worker newspapers.

Sue Ferguson Johnson is a spiritual director of individuals and couples, retreat leader and Scripture teacher of many years’ experience. Formerly a psychologist, Sue left her practice to engage in full-time ministry in 2001. Sue was raised in the United Methodist Church, but with Wes is now at home in the Mennonite Church, where she has been instrumental in reshaping the local church from a committee model to a prayer-Scripture-discernment model.

Together, they share the ministry “Abide in Me,” grounded in the imagery from the Gospel of John that calls disciples to integrate the inner and outer, the mystical and prophetic, the private and public journeys. Every Thursday since  2004 they have hosted a group in their home, in which people join for prayer, Bible study, laughter and communion. They also teach and lead retreats around the Puget Sound area and across the US. Together, they have written lectionary reflections for Pax Christi USA and Radical Discipleship.net.

Sue and Wes together have five children, ages 26-41, and four grandchildren. They live outside Seattle on the edge of Tiger Mountain, where they walk most days. They seek to be open to the leading of the Holy Spirit in all that they do, in proclaiming and embodying Jesus’ Word of passionate purity in love and truth for all creation.

Sessions:
Lifting the veil on empire: the mystical-prophetic nature of apocalyptic literature
We will explore the common cultural misunderstandings of what “apocalyptic” means and introduce the cultural context and nature of the Jewish apocalyptic texts upon which the book of Revelation is grounded.

 “Write…what you see and send it to the seven churches” (Rev 1.11): the messages to the churches (Rev 2-3), then and now
Revelation begins by introducing the Risen Christ as the One empowered by God to preside over the churches. We will engage the messages relayed by John of Patmos, Revelation’s author, to the seven churches of the Roman province of Asia (Rev 2-3) and how that message resonates with our own struggle today to remain faithful amid empire.

Seals, trumpets and bowls: the “plot” of Revelation (Rev 6-16)
 
It can be difficult and confusing to decipher the complex and often wild imagery John of Patmos uses to convey the vision given to him by God. We will explore how the symbolism expresses a story of God’s journey with God’s people, from the beginning to the resurrection of Jesus and beyond.

“Fallen, fallen, is Babylon the Great!” (Rev 18.2): the vision of the collapse of empire
Revelation 17-18 offers the portrait of the “Great Whore,” Babylon, the imperial city which appears to rule the global economy. We will look at the many parallels between “Babylon” and today’s global economy, and what it might mean to “come out,” as the vision calls God’s people to do (18.4).

“I saw the holy city, New Jerusalem, coming down…” (Rev 21.2): the vision of the emergence of God’s reign, on earth as in heaven
With the image of the smoking ruins of Babylon in the background, John’s vision concludes with the joyous, abundant, beautiful scene of the emergence of New Jerusalem, the “holy city,” from God. We’ll see and hear how this vision invites us to embrace ever more fully God’s Way revealed in and through Jesus, in our individual and communal lives.

Laura Reed

Reed_Laura.jpgComing of age during the Cold War era, Laura Reed spent her early career working with scientists and activists to reduce reliance on military force and the threats of nuclear war. She received her PhD from MIT, studying with scientists and political scientists. Her research interests include U.S. national security policy; implications of globalization for peace and security; nuclear security, nonproliferation, and disarmament initiatives; emerging norms of humanitarian intervention and collective responses to transnational problems.

Sessions:
Lives of Commitment: Re-Forming Visions of Social Change

What does it take to sustain a life of commitment that makes positive social change?  Many of us have experienced injustice or hardships that motivate us to challenge the status quo. Yet often we feel powerless in the face of forces beyond our control. This 3-part workshop identifies and develops a model of social change that draws upon the lives and stories of individuals in our community.
We are sometimes taught that it takes a trailblazer, genius or a millionaire to make a difference. But Holden Village is founded and sustained by a loose community that have pursued a life of commitment. What are the insights and lessons that we might draw upon from our experience at Holden Village?

Kate Thorpe

Thorpe_Kate.jpgKate Thorpe is a doctoral candidate in English at Princeton University. Her dissertation seeks to reexamine the trope of personification in eighteenth-century poetry from Milton to Wordsworth. She is also currently completing a poetic manuscript, The Marriage of Art and Industry, about the transformation of post-industrial architecture through art in the Ruhrgebiet, Germany based on research conducted on a Fulbright Fellowship. Kate received an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and her poems have appeared in American Letters & Commentary, Court Green, Volt, and WSQ, among other literary journals. Kate teaches as a preceptor at Princeton and has taught literature and creative writing courses at the University of Iowa, Wesleyan University, and the Technical University in Dortmund, Germany.

Sessions:
Poetry of the Elements
The elements are the basic material building blocks of our world, as language is the basic medium of poetry. In this seminar, we will read and discuss poems about (and even addressed to) the elements, and then experiment with our own writing about elemental nature at Holden. Poems about the elements offer an ideal resource to think through the questions of the power and force of nature, and also the power and force of poetry. How can writing about the wind, fire, water, and earth help us to feel closer to the beautiful—but also awe-inspiring and wild, even sometimes dangerous—nature around us? And can this writing allow us to cultivate a relationship with nature that is recuperative rather than destructive? This is an especially important question in our current climate crisis, and there is nowhere better to explore and experiment with answers than at Holden, a place marked both by natural and human forces.