Summer Teaching Faculty

Holden's visiting summer faculty form the backbone of our educational programming. View the information below to learn more about each of Holden's 2017 visiting faculty members and their sessions.

This summer, we gathered around the theme "Beginning Together." The summer theme brings attention and hope to the difficult task of beginning again. Holden's new beginnings, post-fire and post-remediation, offered a chance to explore the boundaries of our lives together and to explore the healing of our nation during a time in which divisiveness and fear spread at an ever-increasing pace. We seek to use this opportunity to find togetherness when we share differing beliefs. We seek to explore new beginnings as the land in this valley recovers after fire. We seek to explore the future of this place now that many years of construction have ended.

June 11-17, 2017

Hal Taussig

Bio: Hal Taussig is Visiting Professor of New Testament at Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he has taught since 1998. He also is Professor of Early Christianity at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia. He has retired from 30+ years as a United Methodist pastor and now is specially assigned by his bishop as a consultant to local congregations. Among his 14 authored books is the recent A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.

Session: "In All Fears and in Trembling Boldness: Encountering New Scriptures and a Vulnerable God"
As a part of the Living Word programming at Holden, we are looking at a broad series of first and second century texts both within the traditional New Testament and in a number of newly discovered texts from the earliest Christ movement.  We consider especially in view of trying times in the U.S. today how these ancient texts might offer new frames of reference for how our relationship to the divine can unfold.

Suggested Resources:
A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21
st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts
The Thunder: Perfect Mind
(Palgrave Macmillan)
Re-reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Loss and Trauma (Palgrave Macmillan)
In the Beginning Was the Meal: Social Experimentation and Early Christian Identity (Fortress Press)
Wisdom’s Feast: Sophia in Study and Spirituality
(Third edition, Apocryphile Press)
A New Spiritual Home: Progressive Christianity at the Grass Roots (Polebridge Press)


Dr. Katrina Hay

Bio: Dr. Katrina Hay is an associate professor of physics at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington. Her interests in energy, astronomy and music lead to an application approach to teaching physics. She conducts research in observational astronomy and fluid dynamics. Community outreach is one of Katrina’s passions. She designed her department’s first physics demonstration show; presented an astronomy lecture series to inmates at the Washington Correction Center for Women; and created a physics blog to shed light on the thoughts and activities of physicists. In 2015, she wrote, illustrated and independently published the children’s book Little Bear’s Big Night Sky. She believes that the value of physics is that it is a not only knowledge, but also a skill.

Sessions:

  • What is energy? What powers our devices?: Thinking like physicists to solve real-world problems, we discuss basic energy forms and how energy transfers.
  • Our Energy Future: Innovations in responsible use of Earth's resources: Innovations and impacts of energy sources, including hydroelectric, wind, nuclear, ocean wave and geothermal.
  • Our Place in the Universe: Cosmology of space and time: Cosmology reveals elegant structure, physics of space, illusion of time, and the mysterious link between them.

Suggested Resources:
Fabric of the Cosmos
by Brian Greene
Physics for Future Presidents by Richard A. Muller
National Geographic overview of Alternative Energy

Nature’s Spotlight on Alternative Energy

Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey


Kristen Benson, Ph.D., LMFT, CFLE

Bio: Kristen Benson is an Associate Professor of Human Development and Family Science at North Dakota State University. She is a licensed marriage and family therapist and Certified Family Life Educator. Kristen’s research and clinical focus is on providing inclusive and supportive therapy to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) people and relationships. Her current research explores the experiences of parents raising transgender and gender creative children. Kristen is a clinical fellow of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and a member of the National Council on Family Relations. Kristen is a member of First Congregational United Church of Christ, in Moorhead, MN, where she has led adult education on being an inclusive faith community to transgender people.

 Sessions:

  • Understanding Gender Identity and Gender Diversity: This workshop explores gender identity terminology, self-exploration of gender, and inclusive gender diversity.
  • Supporting Gender Creative Children: This session will explore key issues unique to families with transgender and gender creative children and youth.  
  • Creating a Gender Inclusive Faith Community: This session will address the ways that faith communities can become inclusive to gender diversity.

Suggested Resources:

The Transgender Child: A Handbook for Families and Professionals  by Stephanie A. Brill and Rachel Pepper
The Transgender Teen: A Handbook for Parents and Professionals Supporting Transgender and Non-Binary Teens  by Stephanie A. Brill and Rachel Pepper
Gender Spectrum
Family Acceptance Project
Gender Identity and Our Faith Communities: A Congregational Guide for Transgender Advocacy (Human Rights Campaign)
The Religious Institute: Transgender Resources
A Practice Spirit, Do Justice Toolkit: Faithfully Responding to Anti-LGBTQ Legislation (National LGBTQ Task Force)
The Institute for Welcoming Resources


Laura Norton

Bio: Over the last 30 years, Laura Norton has been a joyful practitioner, student, and teacher of the letter arts, studying with world-renowned calligraphers and participating in several international calligraphy events in addition to year-long master courses in various letter forms and techniques. She weekly creates hand-lettered lectionary artwork for use by faith communities (www.LettersAloft.com). She has given presentations on the Saint John’s Bible and the role the arts play in faith expression and in the spiritual imagination which moves us to act with justice and compassion. Laura serves on the Board and faculty of the Grunewald Guild (Plain, WA) and creates art in Bellingham, WA.

Session: "Wild” Calligraphy
The handwritten word is wildly alive because, unlike a digital font, it bears witness to every heartbeat, every breath taken by the calligrapher. We will work with letterforms using a variety of tools and our own hands, beginning with an introduction to (or refresher on) the beautiful Italic hand--majuscules and minuscule--and progressing through the week to practice flourishing and some lively variations on Italic to awaken the individual style of each participant. God has given each of us something important to say, and calligraphy is a powerful, visual way to say it!

Suggested Resources:

The Art and Craft of Hand Lettering by Annie Cicale
The Speedball Textbook by Joanne Fink
Written Letters by Jacqueline Svaren
Foundations of Calligraphy by Sheila Waters


Molly Secor-Turner, Ph. D, RN

Bio: Molly Secor-Turner is an Associate Professor in the School of Nursing and Department of Public Health at North Dakota State University. She also serves as the Director of Programs for the non-profit organization, For the Good PERIOD. Her research examines the influence of social context on adolescent health. In particular, she uses her research to advocate for the health and well-being of adolescents from a human rights perspective. Her research bridges across place through the universal experience of adolescence from rural North Dakota to rural Kenya and among high-risk youth in Fargo.

Sessions:

  • The Story of Menstrual Hygiene Management in rural Kenya: Menstruation is an experience for adolescent girls worldwide. However, girls in resource poor areas, such as rural Kenya, face unique challenges related to menstruation management, leading to 3.5 million missed learning days per month for adolescent girls. Links between school attendance and menstruation are further compounded by socially embedded gender-based barriers and poverty. This session will describe human rights-based strategies to improving the health and well-being of adolescent girls in rural Kenya centered around menstrual hygiene management.
  • Building Partnerships to Work for Global Health: This session will discuss the process and lessons learned building cross-cultural, interdisciplinary partnerships to address global health challenges. In particular, the presenter will share lessons learned and effective strategies for developing global partnerships to engage in community-based and culturally sensitive programs in rural Kenya. Starting a human rights-based non-profit organization to address the relationship between menstrual hygiene and girls’ education will be used as an exemplar.
  • Preparing Menstrual Hygiene Kits for Rural Kenya: In this session, participants will have the opportunity to learn how to prepare menstrual hygiene kits for adolescent girls in rural Kenya. The demonstration will include how washable sanitary pads and distribution bags are made. In addition, we will discuss elements of menstrual hygiene education and approaches to mindful, intentional distribution of over 8,000 pads to rural Kenya.


Matthew Olson: Guest musician

Bio: Based in Minneapolis, Matthew leads a diverse career as a conductor, choral composer, educator, church musician, and arts administrator. He is Founding Artistic Director of Oratory Bach Ensemble, a professional baroque orchestra and chamber choir. Additionally, he serves as: Assistant Conductor of the 40-voice professional choir, The Singers; professor of music and voice at North Hennepin Community College; and Director of Choral Ministries at Westwood Lutheran Church. As a professional singer, he has performed, recorded, and toured with many ensembles including the St. Olaf Choir, The Singers, The Carnegie Hall Festival Choir, The Minnesota Orchestra, The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, The Orchestra of St. Luke’s (NYC), and The Detroit Symphony Orchestra. As a composer, his original works and arrangements are published by Colla Voce and Santa Barbara Music, and are performed throughout the U.S., Europe, South American, and Australia. And as a singer/songwriter exploring the divide between classical and indie rock genres, he made his debut as part of Minnesota Public Radio’s widely acclaimed series, Works for Words.

June 18-24

Hal Taussig

Bio: Hal Taussig is Visiting Professor of New Testament at Union Theological Seminary in New York, where he has taught since 1998. He also is Professor of Early Christianity at the Reconstructionist Rabbinical College in Philadelphia. He has retired from 30+ years as a United Methodist pastor and now is specially assigned by his bishop as a consultant to local congregations. Among his 14 authored books is the recent A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts.

Session: "In All Fears and in Trembling Boldness: Encountering New Scriptures and a Vulnerable God"
As a part of the Living Word programming at Holden, we are looking at a broad series of first and second century texts both within the traditional New Testament and in a number of newly discovered texts from the earliest Christ movement.  We consider especially in view of trying times in the U.S. today how these ancient texts might offer new frames of reference for how our relationship to the divine can unfold.

Suggested Resources:
A New New Testament: A Bible for the 21
st Century Combining Traditional and Newly Discovered Texts
The Thunder: Perfect Mind
(Palgrave Macmillan)
Re-reading the Gospel of Mark Amidst Loss and Trauma (Palgrave Macmillan)
In the Beginning Was the Meal: Social Experimentation and Early Christian Identity (Fortress Press)
Wisdom’s Feast: Sophia in Study and Spirituality
(Third edition, Apocryphile Press)
A New Spiritual Home: Progressive Christianity at the Grass Roots (Polebridge Press)

 

Barbara Rossing

Bio: Barbara Rossing is a professor of New Testament at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, where she also directs the seminary’s environmental ministry emphasis. Her publications include The Rapture Exposed: The Message of Hope in the Book of Revelation (Basic Books, 2004); Journeys Through Revelation: Apocalyptic Hope for Today (Presbyterian Church USA, 2010); “Revelation” in The Fortress Commentary on the Bible (2014), and articles and book chapters on the Bible and ecology, including the Lutheran World Federation's publication "Creation-- Not For Sale." She chairs the Society of Biblical Literature's Ecological Hermeneutics section, and is active in public theology in both the scholarly academy and the church, working on climate change and the Bible. She received the MDiv degree from Yale University Divinity School, and the ThD from Harvard University. Barbara Rossing first came to Holden as waitri in 1973 and also served as Village pastor 1986-88.

Session: Radicalizing Our Roots in Scripture: "All Things New"


Ben Stewart

Bio: Ben teaches worship and ecotheology at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago where he is professor and director of advanced studies. After serving as Village pastor in 2000-2003, he studied at the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Philadelphia (STM) and Emory University (PhD). His first book, A Watered Garden: Christian Worship and Earth’s Ecology, was published in 2011. His research on the natural burial movement recently included a 300 mile backpacking trip visiting dozens of backcountry wilderness cemeteries in Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

Session: Rediscovering Earth Wisdom in Ritual and Daily Life
Are you searching for a deeper ecological spirituality? Many Christians instinctively look to the first chapters of Genesis: 7 days of creation, the Garden of Eden, Noah’s Ark. But there’s an additional (and often-overlooked) strand of creation imagery in scripture: the wisdom tradition. This tradition accents wonder and humility, commonalities between humans and other animals, the natural life cycle, and a shared quest for knowledge. We’ll explore this tradition to discover how it can enrich our personal spirituality and communal life especially through ritual and attention to the natural cycles of the earth.

Suggested Resources:

  • Sisters of Dust, Sisters of Spirit: Womanist Wordings on God and Creation by  Karen Baker-Fletcher
  • Wisdom’s Wonder: Character, Creation, and Crisis in the Bible’s Wisdom Literature by William P. Brown
  • Old Testament Wisdom, Third Edition: An Introduction by James L. Crenshaw
  • Treasures Old and New: The Images in the Lectionary by Gail Ramshaw
  • Gaia and God: An Ecofeminist Theology of Earth Healing by Rosemary R. Ruether
  • The Mystery of Death by Dorothee Sölle
  • “The Place of Earth in Lutheran Funeral Rites: Mapping the Current Terrain.” Dialog 53, no. 2 (June 1, 2014):118–26 by Benjamin M. Stewart
  • A Watered Garden: Christian Worship and Earth’s Ecology by Benjamin M. Stewart


dan spencer

Bio: Dan Spencer is Professor of Environmental Studies and has taught at The University of Montana since 2002.  Some of his areas of teaching and research interest include ecological ethics, ethical issues in ecological restoration, and globalization, justice, and environmental issues in Latin America and Southeast Asia.  He was born and raised in California, and received his B.A. in Geology from Carleton College, Minnesota in 1979, and his Masters (1983) and Ph.D. (1994) in Environmental Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, New York.  He is the author of Gay and Gaia: Ethics, Ecology and the Erotic, published by The Pilgrim Press (1996) and most recently co-authored a book with Laura Stivers and Jim Martin-Schramm: Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach, available through Orbis Press.  Dan has been teaching at Holden since 1986 and most recently participated in the Holden Autumn Sojourn during September 2016.

Session: Deep Time and Christian Responses
Dan will use the documentary, “The Journey of the Universe” to introduce the theme of “deep time”, the Universe’s/Earth’s history, and our place in it.  Participants will watch the film, and then have subsequent classes on The Geological Story of the Pacific Northwest; Climate Change, Faith & Ethics; and Biomimicry and Sustainable Energy: Living on and with the Earth.

Suggested Resources

  • Journey of the Universe by Brian Swimme and Mary Evelyn Tucker


PETER Hernes

Bio: Peter Hernes is a professor at the University of California in Davis, CA, specializing in river biogeochemistry, but extending more broadly into any environment that contains naturally formed organic compounds. He teaches a range of courses, ranging from hardcore aqueous geochemistry to water quality geared toward non-science majors to graduate writing courses to first-year seminars on environmental poetry and classic environmental literature. As an avid hiker, his interest in the environment is not just professional, but personal. Prior to landing in Davis, Dr. Hernes completed his bachelor's degree at Luther College, his master's and Ph.D. at the University of Washington in Seattle, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of South Carolina.

Sessions:

  • The climate change wild child – is it nature or nurture? Climate change is complex, but the individual pieces are not. Let's discuss basic scientific principles and discuss primary facts that lead scientists to conclude that human activity is the greatest contributor to current climate change
  • Are human values compatible with environmental sustainability? Society assumes technology will solve environmental problems, but maybe we need a cultural revolution.  Let’s look at several environmental crises related to sustainability, examine the links between human values and environmental problems and envision a kind of society that would be more compatible with environmental sustainability
  • What the FRACK! Ingenious, earthquakes, energy boon, fossil fuel addiction, jobs, water pollution: what's not to love? Participants will learn how the basic process of hydrofracking works, discuss regulatory challenges of hydrofracking and linkages to climate change (coal vs. natural gas vs. renewable fuels).

Suggested Resources:


maureen ayers looby, md mph

Bio: Dr. Ayers Looby is an obstetrician and gynecologist at Fairview Lakes Medical Center near Minneapolis, MN.  She has special interests in infertility and minimally invasive pelvic surgery and also enjoys doing legislative advocacy on a local and national level.  She has a background in music, with a degree in voice performance from University of Wisconsin-Madison, as well as public health, with a degree in epidemiology from the University of Minnesota.  

Session: Women's Health: Dr. Ayers Looby will initially focus on young women’s health, including common medical conditions in young women, the hormone cycles, as well as infertility and pregnancy.  She will spend a second hour discussing issues related to mature women’s health, including menopause and prevention of chronic disease.

 

peggy haug

Bio: As the grand-daughter of American watercolorist Charles E. Burchfield, Peggy comes by her drawing and painting skills naturally. She focused on water color landscapes until the early 2000’s when she expanded to “whimsical botanicals”, nature journaling, and visual journaling.

Session: Visual Journaling
Are you a journaler? Well, why not write on plain white paper when you could write on decorated pages?  Using simple techniques, we will make our own journal, using fun and simple ways to decoarate the pages in your journal before you write, copy a poem or Bible verse, take notes, or sketch things in Nature.  You will discover that you return time and again to your journals, to reread parts and marvel at memoires and experiences that have been preserved in your journal.

 

LINDA Jensen

Bio: Linda first arrived in Holden as a child in August of 1951 when the Village was a mining community.  Linda has volunteered with museum projects since 1999. Her goal is to help people understand the activities and folks who are part of the 100 plus years of history in this beautiful valley.

Sessions:

  • Miner's Village Walk: Take a walk through the Miner’s Village with a former resident, and learn about life in the Mining days through the eyes of a child.   
  • Bridging Two Communities: Slide presentation showing the many parallels between the two communities of Holden Mine and Holden Village
  • Holden History Early Years: Three short DVD’s with pauses for commentary: ” Forerunners,” the 1961 Work Group, ”Upbuilders,” the 1962 Work Group, and “Holden in the 60’s and Early 70’s”


Matthew Olson: Guest musician

Bio: Based in Minneapolis, Matthew leads a diverse career as a conductor, choral composer, educator, church musician, and arts administrator. He is Founding Artistic Director of Oratory Bach Ensemble, a professional baroque orchestra and chamber choir. Additionally, he serves as: Assistant Conductor of the 40-voice professional choir, The Singers; professor of music and voice at North Hennepin Community College; and Director of Choral Ministries at Westwood Lutheran Church. As a professional singer, he has performed, recorded, and toured with many ensembles including the St. Olaf Choir, The Singers, The Carnegie Hall Festival Choir, The Minnesota Orchestra, The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, The Orchestra of St. Luke’s (NYC), and The Detroit Symphony Orchestra. As a composer, his original works and arrangements are published by Colla Voce and Santa Barbara Music, and are performed throughout the U.S., Europe, South American, and Australia. And as a singer/songwriter exploring the divide between classical and indie rock genres, he made his debut as part of Minnesota Public Radio’s widely acclaimed series, Works for Words.

 

June 25 - July 1

dan Spencer

Bio: Dan Spencer is Professor of Environmental Studies and has taught at The University of Montana since 2002.  Some of his areas of teaching and research interest include ecological ethics, ethical issues in ecological restoration, and globalization, justice, and environmental issues in Latin America and Southeast Asia.  He was born and raised in California, and received his B.A. in Geology from Carleton College, Minnesota in 1979, and his Masters (1983) and Ph.D. (1994) in Environmental Ethics from Union Theological Seminary, New York.  He is the author of Gay and Gaia: Ethics, Ecology and the Erotic, published by The Pilgrim Press (1996) and most recently co-authored a book with Laura Stivers and Jim Martin-Schramm: Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach, available through Orbis Press.  Dan has been teaching at Holden since 1986 and most recently participated in the Holden Autumn Sojourn during September 2016.

Session: "Earth Ethics: A Case Study Approach to Current Environmental Issues"
In this week, I’ll use the case method approach that my co-authors and I developed in our book, Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach, to introduce an interactive way to consider issues of ecological justice and environmental sustainability.  Using a set of interactive “spectrum exercises,” we’ll map out some of the key questions that shape earth ethics, and then use subsequent sessions to discuss some of the case studies in the book.  We’ll also look at how to apply the ethic of ecological justice to many of the issues Holden has faced and continues to face as a retreat center inholding in wilderness faced with significant environmental remediation issues.

Suggested Resources:
Earth Ethics: A Case Method Approach by James Martin-Schramm, Daniel Spencer, and Laura Stivers

 

peder jothen

Bio: Peder Jothen teaches in religion at St. Olaf College. A graduate of the University of Chicago Divinity School, he teaches classes in Bible, theology and ethics. Current and past courses include "Christianity and Social Power," "Christian Ethics: Life and Death," "Christian Aesthetics and Ethics," "Christian Theology and Human Existence," "Theology and Creation," and "Living Faith: Theology and Practice at Holden Village." Currently, his research revolves around questions of moral formation and practice, especially in relation to technology, culture, and art. His first book, "Kierkegaard, Selfhood, and Aesthetics: The Art of Subjectivity" was published in 2014 by Ashgate Publishing.

Session: Living Word

peter hernes

Bio: Peter Hernes is a professor at the University of California in Davis, CA, specializing in river biogeochemistry, but extending more broadly into any environment that contains naturally formed organic compounds. He teaches a range of courses, ranging from hardcore aqueous geochemistry to water quality geared toward non-science majors to graduate writing courses to first-year seminars on environmental poetry and classic environmental literature. As an avid hiker, his interest in the environment is not just professional, but personal. Prior to landing in Davis, Dr. Hernes completed his bachelor's degree at Luther College, his master's and PhD at the University of Washington in Seattle, and a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of South Carolina.

Sessions (please note suggested pre-reading):

  • Joy and Responsibility in Nature (Sand County Almanac): Aldo Leopold's enthusiasm for nature is infectious, but with joy also comes responsibility. Pre-session: If you are attending, please read excerpts from Leopold's A Sand County Almanac
  • This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. The Climate
    Pre-session: If you are attending please read excerpts from Klein's This Changes Everything
  • The End of Nature: Is any part of nature untouched, or have humans superseded everything?
    Pre-Session: If you are attending please read excerpts from Bill McKibben's The End of Nature

Suggested Resources:


kaethe schwehn

Bio: Kaethe Schwehn is the author of Tailings: A Memoir (which won the Minnesota Book Award for creative nonfiction and details a year she spent living at Holden from 2001-2002), Tanka & Me (a chapbook of poems), and The Rending and the Nest (a post-apocalyptic novel forthcoming in 2018). She currently teaches creative writing and composition at St. Olaf College.  Holden has been a part of her being for as long as she can remember. 

Sessions:

  • Writing the Landscapes We've Loved: Facing climate change can make us feel both helpless and hopeless.  Writing about the places we've loved--from mountain peaks to tailing piles, from backyard lots to white sand beaches--can remind us both of our complex relationships with nature and creatively re-energize us to enter the world "down lake" with a refreshed understanding of sacred settings.
  • I, Too, Sing America: From Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing" to Langston Hughes' anguished response, "I, Too, Sing America," poets have wrestled with trying to sing the voice of "we" in a country that is rangy and rebellious and vibrantly diverse.  In this session we'll look at a few poems that attempt to encapsulate the "we" of America before attempting our own communal poem ("I Hear Garbology Singing?")
  • Writing the Bible: From "The Red Tent" to "The Testament of Mary" to "The Gospel According to Jesus Christ," our literary landscape is populated with Biblical re-imaginings.  In this session we will consider a few excerpts from popular historical fiction novels and then practice writing our way into beloved Bible stories.  How might reading and writing Biblical re-imaginings offer us a renewed connection to God?

Suggested Resources:

  • Quarantine by Jim Crace
  • Tailings: A Memoir by Kaethe Schwehn


Claire Smith

Bio: Claire Smith has known and loved Holden for 27 years. Currently in the Masters of Social Work program at University of Washington, Claire is intent on studying the many frameworks for understanding oppression and liberation. She hopes to use this understanding and her love of language to slowly deconstruct unjust systems and rebuild right relationship in all interactions. Claire got her BA in English Literature & Hispanic Studies at Pacific Lutheran University. She received her training in intercultural communication and facilitation through the Krista Foundation for Global Citizenship and Kaleidoscope Institute Northwest. Claire served for 2 years with Jesuit Volunteer Corps Northwest -- 1 year in Portland, OR advocating with Latinx survivors of intimate partner violence and 1 year in St. Xavier, MT working with some of the coolest kids on the Crow Reservation.

Sessions:

  • Do I have a culture? Our current U.S. atmosphere is one of overt racial injustice and political polarization. How do we address these issues? How do we engage in loving community across so much Difference? The first session will focus on the first important step towards intercultural relationship-building: understanding where we come from and what our culture is. Come explore these themes through a variety of exercises, facilitated discussion, and guided meditation.
  • "Sticky" Moments & Cultural Differences: Most of us can identify with that feeling of unease that comes after an encounter across racial/cultural Difference. Perhaps you've thought: "Was that insensitive of me? Why did those people respond to me that way? We were just so different." These sticky moments are formative moments for many of us that we keep coming back to. This session invites exploration of those sticky cross-cultural moments. We will gently delve into these discomforts and go deeper in our understanding of culture by exploring group identities, specifically racial experiences and communication styles.
  • Living Faithfully, Navigating Cultural Differences: How are we called as people of faith to live into loving community across Difference? This session focuses on recognizing the power dynamics that surround culture and finding a way forward. Through guided reflections, discussions, and text study, we ask what our growing cultural awareness calls us to do, be, or change.

 

Mike VanQuickenborne

Bio: Mike VanQuickenborne is a tenured philosophy instructor at Everett Community College, and has taught philosophy at a variety of colleges on both sides of the Cascade crest. He is a graduate of St. Olaf College, earned a Master of Arts in Philosophy from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and did graduate coursework at Purdue University. Along with a slate of introductory philosophy courses, he has taught “Philosophy in the Cinema” since 2000. In 2008 with the help of a grant from Humanities Washington, he organized the world’s first philosophical film festival, “Philosophy in the Dark.” He has been a member of the Humanities Washington Speakers Bureau since 2015 and will continue with Humanities Washington to offer presentations on philosophy around Washington through 2018. His other main area of interest is in the philosophy of religion.

Sessions:

  • Should I take the blue pill? The Matrix and Waking Life as invitations to philosophical questioning: Mike will share how film can motivate some of the most compelling philosophical questions ever considered.
  • Is there any winning the battle for Truth?  The Battle of Algiers and Adaptation as examples of postmodernism: Mike will look at the postmodern challenge to the notion of Truth.
  • Life, the Universe, Religion and Film: The Seventh Seal, Contact, and the Song of Sparrows: Mike will look at films that offer a thoughtful consideration of some challenges for religious faith.
  • "The Good Game: On the moral value of sports" A 75-minute presentation/discussion on the intersection of sports and ethics

Suggested Resources:

We will be looking at clips from the films The Matrix, Waking Life, The Battle of Algiers, Adaptation, The Seventh Seal, Contact, and The Song of Sparrows.

 

Alan Storey

Bio: Alan is a Gospel story-teller located in Cape Town South Africa.  Alan serves in and through the Central Methodist Mission and is an ordained Methodist minister.  Alan was the last conscientious objector brought to trial in Apartheid South Africa for refusing military conscription.  Alan specializes in facilitating Diversity Engagement encounters.

These encounters expose entrenched dynamics of power, privilege and prejudice and attempt to heal the divisions that still divide us.  Alan believes: To take the whole bible literally is an absurdity; Jesus would much rather be followed than worshiped; The division of the world into "saved" and "un-saved" is hate speech; The holy land is not a place to visit but every place to value; There are around 7.2 billion chosen people in the world; The day will come when all guns will be turned into ploughshares (Alan is chairperson of Gun Free South Africa); An anti-queer Church is an anti-Christ Church; Inequality is the weapon of mass destruction. And much more…

Session: "Biblical reflections on these days of our Lives"
Dancing between the biblical text and our present context

 

kelly carlisle: guest village musician

Bio: Kelly Carlisle played his first worship service in the fourth grade and has been a church musician ever since. While studying music education and singing in the choral groups at Pacific Lutheran University he also performed and toured with the group 'Spiritborne' for three years. He taught choral music from 1983 to 2001 and continued his studies at Portland State University, and during that time was very active as a clinician, adjudicator, and guest conductor.

 

Geoff Carlisle: Guest Village Musician

Bio: Geoff Carlisle was raised in Happy Valley, Oregon, and began playing viola at 11. According to his parents, he chose the instrument for its potential to earn him a college scholarship because "nobody wants to play it." He attended St. Olaf College, majoring in music and environmental studies. At St. Olaf, he enjoyed performing in 35 states, as well as Morocco and Spain. In his senior year, he was selected as the concerto competition winner for the St. Olaf Orchestra. He currently resides in Austin, Texas, where he teaches 8th grade science and plays in the Austin Civic Orchestra.

 

July 2 - 8

Bishop patricia lull

Bio: Patricia Lull serves as the bishop of the Saint Paul Area Synod of the ELCA. She acquired nearly four decades of experience in parish ministry, campus ministry, seminary administration and a faith-based non-profit before taking on the role of bishop. With a longstanding interest in the creative convergence of theology, cultural phenomena and the ongoing reformation of the church, in recent months she has been chewing on a new understanding of vocation, suited to the global and political realities of this century.

Sessions: "Against the Grain: Vocation in a Time of Resistance"
Over the past several decades in America communities of faith have rediscovered a voice and passion for witness in the public square. Community organizing efforts, partnerships with local schools and hunger relieving initiatives and advocacy work for the common good are widespread. But what happens when an election reveals a different national agenda? In these five sessions, participants will consider the re-forming work of vocation in a time of resistance. Using presentations, short readings and small group discussion, participants will be challenged to embrace their own vocation in a fresh way.

Suggested Resources:

  • "Fear of a Black Mother" by Shannon Gibney and "Fighting the Oppressive Whiteness" by Rodrigo Sanchez-Chavarria, both published in A Good Time for the Truth: Race in Minnesota
  • Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance
  • "The Simplicity of the Christian Life" by William Stringfellow, published in A Private and Public Faith
  • Public Faith by Miroslav Volf
  • "Job and Vocation: Discerning the Difference" by Nora Tubbs Tisdale. Reflections Vol 99 No 1
  • "Good Work is Our Gift to the Future" by Joan Chittister. Reflections Vol 99 No 1
  • "Living Amid Empire As Neighborhood" by Walter Brueggemann, published in Reality, Grief, Hope: Three Urgent Prophetic Tasks
  • Bias and the Pious: The Relationship Between Prejudice and Religion by James E. Dittes
  • Christ and Culture by H. Richard Niebuhr
  • Vocation by Douglas J. Schuurman

 

elizabeth person

Bio: Elizabeth Person is an illustrator and designer based in Everett, Washington. Using pen and watercolor, she sketches from life and creates "illustrative infographics," featuring Northwest themes and geography. Her artwork can be spotted on event posters, at northwest art festivals, in Metsker Maps of Seattle and on the blog Live in Everett. She has served as a Cultural Arts Commissioner for the City of Everett since 2011. In the winter/spring of 2015 she was thrilled to be an Artist-in-Resident at Holden Village. Her love for maps map result from her tendency to get lost.

Sessions:

  • You Are Here: An interactive class about maps and place: We will explore the significance, intrigue and history of maps, with a bit of map-making thrown in. Geography is both global and personal, so we'll discover the ways that stories can be mapped, through several interactive projects. No drawing or way-finding skills required!  
  • Map-Making/Art (Mapping Your Life): Have you ever considered the unique map that makes up your life experiences? We will create individualized maps that may defy conventional geography, but will perfectly mimic the landscape of your life. No drawing skills required!

Suggested Resources:

  • Maphead by Ken Jennings
  • A Field Guide to Getting Lost by Rebecca Solnit
  • On Trails by Robert Moor

 

jason derose

Bio: Jason is the Western Bureau Chief & Senior Editor for Religion at NPR News. You hear his work on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition even though you don’t hear my voice.  He is a council member at my congregation — St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Santa Monica, where he chairs the seminary internship committee.  Jason volunteers as a mentor for student journalists through NLGJA: The Association of LGBT Journalists and is active in the Religion News Association. He graduated from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota, with majors in English & religion. He has an M.Div. from the University of Chicago Divinity School. Jason also studied at the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago and Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

Sessions:

  • The Listening Room - A Sense of Place: Stories can take you to places you’ve never been and may never go. We may live in a hyper-visual world, but the pictures are better on the radio. An old tag line in a public radio marketing campaign was, “NPR takes your there.” Stories can take you to places you’ve never been and may never go: to a bluff in Montana to hear wolves, or a neighborhood in Washington, D.C. to meet residents, or a field in Wyoming to learn how to hunt with a falcons. In this session, we’ll explore how audio can create a sense of place.
  • The Listening Room - Revealing Characters: Characters come alive through stories.
    People in news stories sometimes appear more as anecdotes than as three-dimensional characters. Rather than reducing people to serve the purposes of a story, the best stories allow characters to develop into fully realized human beings. In this session, we’ll explore how characters can come alive in audio stories. 
  • The Listening Room - Encountering Conflict: Stories about conflict can help listeners empathize with people unlike themselves. Journalists are often accused of focusing almost exclusively on conflict. That’s true, but not for cynical reasons. Rather, good stories involve tension — the various sides striving for what each believes is right. Conflict can be more than person versus person. The best stories develop multiple tensions: person vs. nature, person vs. self, etc. In this session, we’ll explore how conflict keeps you listening and helps you care.

Suggested Resources:

  • Out on the Wire: Storytelling Secrets of the New Masters of Radio by Jessica Abel
  • Reality Radio: Telling True Stories in Sound edited by John Biewen and Alexa Dilworth

 

nancy winder

Bio: Nancy Winder is an ELCA pastor. She has been involved at Holden Village since she was on volunteer staff in 1971. One of the first Lutheran women ordained, Nancy was the Village Pastor from 1976-1978, and again in 2009-2010. In between she served congregations in the Greater Seattle area, especially Faith Lutheran from 1981-2009. She most recently served as Assistant to the Bishop for Candidacy for the Northwest Washington Synod. Nancy has been on Teaching Faculty at Holden many times, especially for Bible Study, mystery fiction, and the work of the Inklings (C.S. Lewis, Dorothy L. Sayers, J.R.R. Tolkien and others). She was the Teaching Staff Coordinator in 1997 and 2007 as well. Nancy also plays viola and is choir singer, and she enjoys cooking, reading, knitting, and travel. She is married to Holden's Museum Director, Larry Howard, and they live in Seattle.

Sessions:

  • A New Creation Comes to Life and Grows: St. Paul's Re-creation Theology: The letters of Paul provide us with wonderful language about a new creation in Christ. Looking at these texts, we'll explore how they inform our own lives and our communities.

  • A New Creation Comes to Life and Grows: American Culture and Paul’s Proclamation of Freedom in Christ: On the Fourth of July we’ll explore how we view freedom in America and the biblical texts about freedom in Christ.

  • A New Creation Comes to Life and Grows: Grace in the New Creation - Luther's Use of Paul's Letters: We'll explore how Martin Luther used Paul's writings as a core element of the theology of the Reformation.

  • A New Creation Comes to Life and Grows: How Paul and Luther Influence Life and Community Today: We'll explore the gifts in the writings of Paul and Luther that help shape our community life in church and culture.

  • A New Creation Comes to Life and Grows: Holden Village and St. Paul’s Re-creation Theology

 

ron young

Bio: Currently, Ron serves as Consultant for Jewish, Christian and Muslim religious leaders of the National Interreligious Leadership Initiative for Peace in the Middle East.  He and his wife lived in Jordan for three years, representing Quakers, and regularly visited Israel, the West Bank and Gaza, Egypt, Syria and Lebanon. Ron has led a dozen interfaith trips to the region. In 1962-64 he worked with Rev. Jim Lawson in a black Methodist congregation in Memphis. During the Vietnam War Ron served as National Youth Secretary for the Fellowship of Reconciliation and then National Peace Education Secretary for the American Friends Service Committee. He has had op-ed articles on U.S. policy in the Middle East published in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times and in the local Everett Herald. His memoir, Crossing Boundaries in the Americas, Vietnam and the Middle East, was published in 2014.

Sessions:

  • Welcome to the Contemporary Middle East: The Middle East, past and present, with particular focus on current situations in Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Iran and DAESH (ISIS), considering the roles of religion, countering stereotypes, and viewing the Iran Nuclear Deal as a source of hope for the future.
  • Israeli-Palestinian Peace Is Still Possible? Why is the Israeli-Palestinian difficult to resolve? Why did six US peace initiatives fail? Why still two states and what can be done now to keep the prospect for peace alive?
  • Meeting Our Muslim Neighbors Near and Far: What do we need to know about Islam and Islamophobia? Who are our Muslim neighbors and how do we get to meet and know them? How can we act ins solidarity with our Muslim neighbors against prejudice and hate crimes?
  • Crossing Boundaries in the Americas, Vietnam and the Middle East: A reading and Q&A, from Ron's memoir, Crossing Boundaries in the Americas, Vietnam and the Middle East, about which former ELCA Presiding Bishop wrote, “Crossing Boundaries is more than one person’s memoir. Ron Young’s life is a witness that the deepest chasms that divide us as people, including race, politics, and religion – with their complexities, histories, and seemingly irresolvable conflicts – call us to renewed resolve to be about God’s work of reconciliation, justice and peacemaking.”
  • Reflections for Today from a Visit to Vietnam Fifty Years After the American War: Both Ron and his wife, Rev. Carol Jensen, were anti-war activists in the 1960s – Carol in Seattle and Berkley with the Ecumenical Peace Institute, Ron as national staff with FOR and AFSC. This was Ron’s fifth visit to Vietnam, having made trips to the South and the North during the war, and again in 1995 to attend the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Vietnam-USA Friendship Society.

Suggested Resources:

  • On the Middle East, participants can check on the Web for the Arab Human Decelopment Report (2002), plus follow-up reports and an article by Ambassador Daniel Kurtze, “Dealing with Daesh (ISIS): Stay the Course.” 

  • On the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict, David K. Shipler’s book Arab and Jew: Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land (revised and updated 2015) and T. Gitlin and L. Liebovitz, Chosen Peoples: America, Israel and the Burdens of Election. 

  • On Islam and Muslims,  Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf, What’s Right with Islam: A New Vision for Muslims and the West, and Todd H. Green, The Fear of Islam: An Introduction to Islamophobia in the West. Also check out, The Quran with References to the Bible.


katie monsen

Bio: Katie Monsen is a lecturer in Environmental Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, where she teaches courses in agroecology, climate, freshwater ecology, and watersheds. She also teaches the introductory course for the Sustainability minor and with the Rachel Carson College. She earned her PhD at UCSC, a masters in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology from Iowa State University, and a bachelors degree from Pacific Lutheran University.

Sessions:

  • The Great, Wide C around Us: Exploring the Carbon Cycle and Reforming Our Carbon Footprints: What is all the fuss with carbon? Explore its cycling in our world and what your C footprint means.
  • Carbon at the Table: Examining the Intersections of Climate and Agriculture: Can agriculture help slow climate change? We will explore reformations of the food system.
  • Secrets of the Not-So-Deep: Macroinvertebrates of the Re-formed Creek: Get your feet wet as we examine Railroad Creek's water quality by sampling its aquatic organisms.

Suggested Resources:

  • What We Know about Climate Change by Kerry Emanuel
  • Drawdown: The Most Comprehensive Plan Ever Proposed to Reverse Global Warming edited by Paul Hawken
  • "Climate Change and Food Systems" by Sonja Vermeulen, Bruce Campbell, and John Ingram. Published in the Annual Review of Environment and Resources 2012, Vol 37.
  • "Soil as Carbon Storehouse: New Weapon in Climate Fight?" by Judith Schwartz. Published at Yale Environment 360, March 4, 2014.
  • "Livestock and Climate Change" by Robert Goodland and Jeff Anhang. Published in World Watch, Nov./Dec. 2009.
  • Guide to Freshwater Macroinvertebrates

 

steve wolbrecht: Village musician

Bio: While Steve’s day job is as an engineer for Honeywell Aerospace, his vocation is in music. He is the lead composer for Dead Gentlemen Productions and Zombie Orpheus Entertainment, having scored a dozen feature and short films to date, and routinely serves as a substitute accompanist for Lutheran churches in the Tacoma area.

July 9 - 15

Kathryn Schifferdecker

Bio: Kathryn Schifferdecker is an Associate Professor of Old Testament at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, MN. She is also an ordained ELCA pastor, having served rural parishes in Iowa and Wisconsin. Her teaching interests include biblical narrative, creation theology, preaching, and questions of suffering. Kathryn is married to Doug Steinke and they have three children – Esther, Isaac, and Sarah (yes, all Old Testament names). Kathryn loves hiking, backpacking, gardening, and keeping Sabbath.

Session:  "Learning Our Place: Humility and Wonder in the Book of Job"
Participants will dwell in the book of Job and explore the questions that the book raises: Why do bad things happen to good people? Where is God in my suffering? What kind of world is this, with its great potential for joy and for pain? What is our place as human beings in this world? Special attention will be paid to the themes of humility and wonder in the book of Job, as God takes Job out to “where the wild things are” at the end of the book. Participants will explore these themes and more through lecture, discussion, meditation, music, and art.

 

Chuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman 

Bio: Chuck Hoffman + Peg Carlson-Hoffman, Holden Village Co-Executive Directors, have shared a ministry of reconciliation rooted in community building and shared artwork, a prophetic ministry which has taken them into some of the most intractable places of religious and political conflict around the globe. Through their studio, Genesis + Art, they have worked in Belfast, Northern Ireland, as well as Israel/Palestine, India, and many communities here in the USA. Their work in Belfast over many years runs especially deep - at the core of their sense of call to Holden at this time of building vital and vibrant work in developing innovative new programs for Holden in its ongoing process of healing. 

This is the creative process they bring into Holden Village and collaborative workshop settings where they facilitate dialogue through art with groups to create greater understanding among diverse people. The transformative power of art runs deep. It is at the core of their calling to Holden, especially at this time of building vital, vibrant, and innovative programs to heal the land, the community and to equip those who come to learn in the Village to find a common purpose which unites rather than divides.

Session: Art Workshop
An artistic extension and exploration alongside the theological study of Job offered by Kathryn Schifferdecker.

 

glenn jordan

Bio: Glenn is a native of Bray in Co Wicklow in Ireland and has been living in Northern Ireland since 1987. For 15 years he has worked on Skainos Square, a transformative urban regeneration project in the inner city of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is currently pursuing doctoral studies in Isaiah looking at the issue of imagination and community transformation. He enjoys sport, particularly rugby, cycling and football, walking his two dogs, listening to music and blogging on the crookedshore

Session: "Imagining Transformation"
How can we use the biblical text as a tool for sparking imagination for transformational work in the world?  I’ve worked in the inner city for nearly two decades now and am struck by how deprivation of imagination is as much an impact of poverty as any of the other more common measures of deprivation. By looking at the Scriptures together, particularly the prophets, we’ll learn how the text can fire our imagination for the challenge of change.

 

Joseph Siebert

Bio: Dr. Siebert is Emeritus Professor of Pathology in the School of Medicine, University of Washington.  Part of his graduate training and scientific research has been in the fields of evolutionary biology and physical anthropology. As a life-long Christian, he has a deep interest in the interplay of religion and evolution.

Sessions:

  • In the Beginning, God: A Christian's View of Evolution
    God’s creativity as reflected in scripture, creed, and sacrament gives us a road map for understanding evolution.
  • In the Beginning, God: Part Two - Scientific Approaches to Evolutionary Biology
    See how the many and varied efforts of scientists contribute to the understanding of evolution.
  • In the Beginning, God: Part Three - God's On-going Creation
    How do we respond to and participate in God's on-going creation?

 

thomas martin

Bio: Tom Martin grew up in Nebraska, did graduate work in the UK, is an ordained Lutheran pastor and is Associate Prof. of Religion at Susquehanna University. He specializes in New Testament, Environmental Ethics and Science and Religion courses.  His style emphasizes humor as a teaching tool and making interdisciplinary connections.
Sessions:

  • Models of God drawn from Evolutionary Theory and Cosmology
    We build models of God based on our experience of creation and scripture.  Evolution and physics suggest thinking of God as a jazz composer not a micro-manager.
  • Ecology and Self-Formation in Built Environments
    Buildings in which we live and work shape our self-formation.  A theology of the built environment helps in redesigning buildings to shape people more strongly related to nature.
  • The New Testament and De-centering Anthropocentrism
    Theology traditionally imagines God primarily concerned about human beings.  Can we de-center ourselves to allow God to care about the rest of creation?

Resources


REBECCA WEE

Bio: Rebecca is a poet and an English/creative writing professor at Augustana College in Rock Island, IL, where she has been teaching since 1994.  Her poetry collection, Uncertain Grace, won the Hayden Carruth Award for New and Emerging Poets in 2001. In 2001 she was also awarded a Witter Bynner Fellowship by U.S. poet laureate Billy Collins and the Library of Congress, and she has served as the 2nd poet laureate of the Quad Cities.  Her work has been published in journals and anthologies including Ploughshares and the Iowa Review, and she had an impatiently languishing second manuscript waiting for attention, titled Instead

Sessions:

  • Learn to Notice What You Notice: This is a creative writing workshop that will include writing prompts focused on the expansive and diminutive details around and inside us at all times.
  • My heart on a Swing Touched the Sky: This is a creative writing workshop that will include prompts focused on writing poems that praise and celebrate places, people, critters, ideas, feelings, seasons, music, food, survival, doubt – it’s a beautifully endless list.
  • Everything is punished by your absence: This is a creative writing workshop that will include writing prompts focused on poems of struggle, suffering, and loss.  There is healing in expression, even as it an be painful to examine what hurts us.  There can be great healing in making art out of our wounds.


Dr. Paul Hessburg

Session: "The Era of Megafires"
The Wildfire Project is a 60-minute, multi-media, traveling presentation hosted by Dr. Paul Hessburg (Pacific Northwest Research Station and the University of Washington), who has conducted fire and landscape ecology research for more than 27 years. The presented material comes in the form of fast-moving, short, topic-based talks interspersed with compelling video vignettes and features the work of wildfire photographer, John Marshall.

 

Elly McHan: Village Musician

Bio: Elly serves as Campus Pastor at Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, a college of the ELCA.  Her first call with the Evangelical Lutheran Church was in Jordan and the Holy Land, living in Palestine for two years. Elly also served and worked with congregations in Oslo, Norway and Salzburg, Austria.  Musically, violin and viola are a part of her daily life.

 

July 16 - 22

Gary Mason

Bio: Rev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organization based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project, which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co-existence and shared space, and it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianisation efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognized by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster. Gary is a Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peace building, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation.

Sessions: The Role of the Faith Community in Building Peace and Reconciliation

  • Sessions 1 & 2: The role of reconciliation, memory, and theology on shaping the public
  • Session 3: From extremism to inclusion, what hardliners joining the Peace Process in Northern Ireland can teach a post-election United States
  • Session 4: Redirecting the church outwards

Suggested Resources

 

Nadia Bolz-Weber

Bio: Nadiz Bolz-Weber is the author of two New York Times bestselling memoirs:  Pastrix: The Cranky, Beautiful Faith of a Sinner & Saint (2013) and Accidental Saints: Finding God in All the Wrong People (2015). She is an ordained Lutheran pastor (ELCA) and still works as the founding pastor of House for All Sinners and Saints in Denver, Colorado. Nadia travels domestically and internationally as a speaker and has been featured on NPR’s Morning Edition, On Being with Krista Tippett, Fresh Air, CNN and in the Washington Post, Bitch magazine, The Daily Beast, More magazine and The Atlantic. International media coverage includes BBC World Service and The Guardian and magazine features in Germany, Poland, and Switzerland. Nadia lives in Denver with her family and her Great Dane, Zacchaeus.

Sessions:

  • Romp through the church year with sinners and saints
  • A week in the life of a neurotic preacher
  • 500 years since Luther and where are we now?

 

Jason Mahn

Bio: Hailing from Rock Island, IL, Jason is a Christian theologian who teaches courses on Luther, vocation, ecology, intentional religious communities, and contemporary Christian theology at Augustan College.  He just published “becoming a Christian in Christendom: Radical Discipleship and the Way of the Cross in American “Christian” Culture, as well as a co-authored book with four of his colleagues at other ELCA colleges: *Radical Lutherans/Lutheran radicals.  Jason is married to Laura, and ordained minister of the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ); they live and work and play with their sons: Asa (11) and Gabe (9).

Sessions: "Radical Lutherans/Lutheran Radicals"
A presentation and discussion of several radical Lutherans/Lutheran radicals (Martin Luther, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Dorothee Soelle – and maybe even you). Focusing on one figure per day, we will trace how their Christian commitments lead them to countercultural work for social justice.  Through presentation, film clips, and discussion of the book, Radical Lutherans/Lutheran Radicals (Cascade, 2017, ed. Jason Mahn), participants will (re)discover how God’s radical grace can be lived out in radical ways. 

Suggested Resources


Richie Blink

Bio: Richie Blink is the Plaquemines Community Outreach Coordinator at Restore the Mississippi River Delta and a founding member of New Harmony High School. In his roles Richie works closely with local stakeholders to ensure widespread support of sustainable coastal restoration of the Mississippi River Delta. Prior to joining the coalition Richie was employed with Plaquemines Parish Government as Coastal Zone Manager to achieve zero net loss of wetlands. Richie uses his extensive and lifelong knowledge of the Mississippi River Delta for both work and play. He has organized grassroots wetland restoration efforts that resulted in the planting of more than 15,000 cypress trees to reverse land loss and reduce storm surge near his home south of New Orleans. He serves as a board member of the Woodlands Conservancy, a nonprofit land trust organization focused on preservation of Louisiana’s coastal forest ecosystems. In his free time he guides motorboat tours into Louisiana’s coastal wetlands for Lost Lands Environmental Tours L3C. Always exploring, Richie holds a private pilot license and is a licensed boat captain.

Sessions: Dealing with Coastal Changes in the Mississippi River Delta in an Equitable and Just Way
Since European occupation of the Mississippi River Delta began, the area has transformed from a completely natural system to one controlled by humans. The changes to the natural process of the delta have brought both positive and negative realities. These sessions will describe the changes and spell out ways they can be mitigated in a just and equitable way.


Michon Weeks

Bio: Michon Weeks is a visiting assistant professor of studio art at St. Olaf College, teaching courses in drawing, painting, figure drawing, and Senior Seminars. She received her MFA in Drawing and Painting from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis and her BA from Iowa State University, Ames. Michon draws familiar objects combined with sacred texts as a way to ask questions and see metaphorical intersections. Drawing is central to the way she works. Transfiguration through abstraction has been her abiding interest. Michon created twenty etched-glass drawings for the windows of the library in Marshall, MN. The drawings depicted roadside objects of local significance. Michon was one of six Minnesota artists whose artwork was featured on a limited edition set of pint glasses sold at the Walker Art Center Shop. She has served as a creative host at the Walker Art Center for activities such as Art School: Public Practice, Tape Murals at the Drawing Club, and Thinking with a Pencil at Open Field Day. In 2015 Michon created a 27-foot long wall drawing in Old Main at St. Olaf College. The drawing depicts images of objects in her garage (hammer, bicycle, saw, grill) combined with text from Ezekiel's vision of the wheel as recorded in the Old Testament.

Sessions:

  • Capturing Beauty: Contour Drawing
    We have a natural impulse to capture beautiful or interesting things we see when traveling—which means that we are likely to take a picture with our phones. Drawing is a way to notice and remember more about the things we want to preserve. Learners will use contour line drawings to look closely and capture things of beauty and interest in a drawing journal.
  • Capturing Beauty: Drawing Conditions
    We have a natural impulse to capture beautiful or interesting things we see when traveling—which means that we are likely to take a picture with our phones. Drawing is a way to notice and remember more about the things we want to preserve. Students will learn how to foster creativity by setting particular drawing conditions to determine how, where, and what they will draw when traveling. Students will draw in a visual journal.
  • Capturing Beauty: Hiker Report
    We have a natural impulse to capture beautiful or interesting things we see when traveling—which means that we are likely to take a picture with our phones. Drawing is a way to notice and remember more about the things we want to preserve. Learners will create a “Hiker Report” of drawings and notes in their visual journals while taking a walk.

Suggested Resources

  • "The Shape of a Walk" from Wanderlust: A History of Walking by Rebecca Solnit
  • "On Possessing Beauty" from The Art of Travel by Alain de Botton


Emily Swanson

Bio: Emily Swanson is interested in the ways that language choices can influence our cultural, political, and physical world. She earned her Ph.D. in English from the University of Minnesota in 2007, with a dissertation titled, "Natural Arguments: Popular Discourse and Environmental Legislation, 1945-2007," and she spent two summers as a National Park Service ranger at Glacier National Park. She teaches writing at Anoka Technical College, where she aims to empower her students to be confident writers. She has presented at the Under Western Skies conferences and the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment conferences. When she is not teaching, she enjoys being active in the outdoors with her family.

Sessions:

  • Wilderness as a Cultural Construction: Wilderness is an historic but constantly changing idea. How do we understand wilderness in a place like Holden Village? Wilderness is an idea that has been around for millennia, but it has changed over time. From the Bible to the present, understandings in the Western imagination about wilderness have changed. As a place that "welcomes all people of good will who seek contemplation and community in the remote wilderness of the beautiful Cascade Mountains," Holden is a particularly meaningful place to consider what wilderness means. 
  • Wilderness and Justice: How have ideas about wilderness excluded people? Can shifting ideas about wilderness contribute to justice and inclusivity? Because wilderness has often been understood as a place apart from human activity, it has been used to exclude indigenous populations, people of color, and women. Recently, groups have begun to promote wilderness experiences for disenfranchised groups, such as minority youth, veterans, or former inmates, offering avenues for making wilderness areas places of empowerment.
  • Wilderness in an Era of Climate Change: How do we define wilderness in an era of climate change? Can wilderness exist when humans have deeply impacted the world? In The End of Nature, Bill McKibben argued that nature is no longer a force that operates apart from humans. Geologists are debating if we have entered a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, based on deep human impacts. What do these impacts mean for wilderness? We will explore what wilderness means in an era of climate change, especially for a community like Holden Village.

Suggested Resources:

Jannele Mastin

Bio: Exploring the intersection of worship and immersive creative experience, Jannele Mastin has been creating large scale artwork to illuminate teaching, worship and provoke deeper thought into God’s ways for over 20 years.  Jannele has worked as a Senior Art Director for print, digital media and 3-D product in Kansas City while coordinating visual art opportunities and creating mixed media work for Jacob’s Well Church and other venues.

Sessions: Liturgical Art - Relevance and Creation of New Works for Worship
Explore the creative process of linking verbal and visual storytelling, find ways to reveal the relevant visual essence of a theme or teaching and discover the fun and challenge of designing large scale work inside or in the absence of existing communal worship spaces…all while creating a piece for the Holden Village community.

Suggested Resources:

  • Visual Faith: Art, Theology, and Worship in Dialogue by William Dyrness


Elly McHan: Village Musician

Bio: Elly serves as Campus Pastor at Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, a college of the ELCA.  Her first call with the Evangelical Lutheran Church was in Jordan and the Holy Land, living in Palestine for two years. Elly also served and worked with congregations in Oslo, Norway and Salzburg, Austria.  Musically, violin and viola are a part of her daily life.

 

July 23 - 29

gary mason

Bio: Rev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organization based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project, which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co-existence and shared space, and it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianisation efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognized by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster. Gary is a Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peace building, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation.

Sessions: The Role of the Faith Community in Building Peace and Reconciliation

  • Sessions 1 & 2: The role of reconciliation, memory, and theology on shaping the public
  • Session 3: From extremism to inclusion, what hardliners joining the Peace Process in Northern Ireland can teach a post-election United States
  • Session 4: Redirecting the church outwards

Suggested Resources

 

GLENN AND DEBorAh DOERING

Bio:

Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts. Deborah received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When not working in collaboration, her individual works focus on the relationship of the keywords Nature and Technology, and can be seen at www.DeborahDoering.com.

Glenn received his MS in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago. His individual works explore the keywords Biology, Body, and Fashion. He creates unique wearable objects that can be seen at https://www.instagram.com/parlaarte/

Together, Deborah and Glenn have created participatory “art actions” in many parts of the world. In addition, the Doerings have co-directed an alternative art space, taught art and design, and have worked with non-profits and for-profit organizations.

 The Doerings believe that the strength of DOEprojekts is to find common ground in working with each other, with other artists/artisans, and with the public – moving contemporary culture toward “the common good.”

Sessions: Socially-Engaged Art Collaborative DOEprojekts
Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts. Deborah and Glenn emphasize both experiences and artifacts as they work with communities and individuals. We are able to find a strong common ground in almost any situation. We want this to be the strength of DOEprojekts – to find common ground in working with each other, with other artists/artisans, and with the public.

Suggested Resources:

 

Paul Rohde

Bio: Paul is campus pastor at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, SD.  His passion is narrative theology. He tells his students he studies it to convince them their lives are stories and not answers because the Gospel itself is a story.  He taught at Holden for the first time in 1993 and returned in various capacities every year until 2012.  He and his wife, Susan, are parents to three grown daughters and very happy new grandparents.  For fun, they play piano duets, garden, hike, camp and travel.  They are very eager to return to Holden.

Sessions: Living Word - Listening to Genesis for cues about loving our neighbors and siblings 
The Genesis saga of Abraham and his family narrates persistent sibling struggles and the birth of Judaism, Islam, and [eventually] Christianity.  We listen to Isaac and Ishmael, Esau and Jacob, Rachel and Leah, and Joseph and his siblings for clues about interfaith relationships, religious violence and faithful response.  Setting religious violence in the context of sibling rivalry helps us read the texts as both cosmic and personal.  Don’t we all have tales about our siblings?  The insightful work of Rabbi Jonathon Sacks, Not in God’s Name: Confronting Religious Violence will be a guide.

Resources:

  • Not in God's Name: Confronting Religious Violence by Jonathan Sacks


Kirsten Olsen

Bio:

After a stint at Grinnell College and taking a formative class called Theologies of Nonviolence, Kirsten attended the University of MN, Morris where she double majored in Sociology and Human Service, studied abroad at a folk school in Denmark, and recovered Sunday mornings by watching the hip TV show “This week with Sam Donaldson and Cokie Roberts.”

After college Kirsten scored a life changing internship at Highlander Education and Research Center where she got to walk in the footsteps of some of the greatest social justice activists in our nation’s history: Rosa Parks, Stokely Carmichael, Martin Luther King, Jr., and Pete Seeger.

She went to graduate school at The Ohio State University to pursue her interests in social movements and organizational change.  After completing her thesis, Kirsten moved back to MN and now teaches General Sociology, Gender in Society, Sociology of Food and Sociology of Power at Anoka-Ramsey Community College in Coon Rapids, MN.  During the Spring 2017 semester, Kirsten spearheaded a bystander intervention initiative on campus to promote dialogue and action when students observe bullying, harassment, or the threat of harassment

Sessions:

  • In the Words of Marvin Gay, What’s Going on?: Separate fact from fiction as we examine social trends related to race, ethnicity, SES, gender, and sexuality.
  • In the presence of bullies: bystander intervention tips, complexities, and conversation: The workshop will address bystander intervention strategies when an individual witnesses a situation that involves bullying, harassment, or the threat of harassment based on any real or perceived characteristic (race, ethnicity, religion, sexual orientation, sexual expression, gender identity, ability, political orientation, etc.).  Participants will learn about intervention techniques, discuss intervention options for scenarios in small groups, and have a chance to suggest their own hypothetical scenarios and/or discuss actual past experiences.  The session will wrap-up with an acknowledgement that this is a messy topic and a challenge that we all pay more attention to bullying and harassing behaviors and take action steps to intervene.

  • Harassment online: intervention tips, complexities, and conversation: The workshop will address bystander intervention strategies when an individual observes bullying, harassment, the threat of harassment, and other inappropriate comments on social media.  Participants will learn about intervention techniques specifically related to social media, discuss intervention options for scenarios in small groups, and have a chance to suggest their own hypothetical scenarios and/or discuss actual past experiences.  The session will wrap-up with an acknowledgement that this is a messy topic and a challenge that we all pay more attention to bullying and harassing behaviors and take action steps to intervene when we access social media after leaving Holden.


Greg Mileski

Bio: Greg is an ELCA parish pastor currently studying Hindu and Buddhist philosophy at the University of Colorado Boulder.  He hopes next to pursue a PhD in Comparative Theology, asking how these religious traditions can help us to better understand what it means to be a Christian working for the Reign of God in a globalized world alongside our neighbors. 

Sessions:

  • Why Matter Matters: For Christians, what does it mean to be a person?  To have a soul?  To have a body?  And what connects us to our world?  
  • Buddhism and the Trinity: What makes us matter to each other?  Are we connected to one another and, if so, how?  And what does that mean for community?
  • Thy Kingdom Come: What does the Reign of God look like, here and now?  And how can we participate in God’s Reign on Earth?


Kris Voss-Rothmeier

Bio: Rev. Kris Voss-Rothmeier is a Presbyterian minister and middle school teacher in Portland, Oregon.  Right after college, Kris worked and lived in a homeless shelter through a volunteer organization in an inner-city neighborhood in Washington, DC.  He also worked as a full-time volunteer with Habitat for Humanity in San Antonio, TX and Baltimore, MD before living at Holden Village as the fire chief from 1990 to 1992.  He and his wife, Susan, met at Holden in 1991.  He began seminary at San Francisco Theological Seminary in 1992 and spent his internship year in the Philippines in 1994.  Upon graduation, he pastored two multi-racial churches in St. Louis, Missouri in the late 1990s.  In 1997, Kris was trained as an anti-racism workshop leader in St. Louis through the National Conference for Community and Justice and has preached and led workshops on anti-racism themes since then.  In 2000, he and Susan moved to Portland where he served as Associate Pastor for youth and Christian Education at Milwaukie Presbyterian Church for five years.  In 2006, he earned his MEd from Portland State University and he currently teaches Social Studies at Clear Creek Middle School in Gresham, Oregon.  Clear Creek has a very diverse student population where white students are the minority.  In June 2017, he will complete a year-long course of study at the University of Portland which focuses on equity training for educators.  His wife works in the Multnomah County Library as a social worker.  Their two children, Henry and Ellie, are both adopted from the Philippines and attend schools in Portland.

Sessions:

  • De-Forming the Beloved Community: A History of Racism in Early America: This session will begin by laying the groundwork for having conversations about race and racism.  Participants will understand key terms and gain a common framework for understanding racism.  We'll use that framework as we explore the history and development of racism and economic control in early America from the 1500s to the end of institutionalized slavery in America.  Key points include first encounters with indigenous peoples, the beginning of the Columbian Exchange, European colonization in the Americas, Indian slaves, and the "peculiar institution" of American slavery.
  • In-Forming the Beloved Community:  Racism in Contemporary America: Since slavery ended over 150 years ago, racism has changed form several times.  As America has grown in wealth and power in the world, it has continued to create mechanisms to keep certain people in control and others from gaining control.  We'll explore those mechanisms which include race-based debt slavery, Jim Crow laws, and mass incarceration.
  • Re-Forming the Beloved Community: Engaging in Meaningful Conversations About Race: Talking about racism is difficult in our culture.  Though race influences practically every aspect of our daily lives, we are unsure about how to address racial differences that lead to power differences.  White people get stuck feeling guilty while people of color get frustrated that nothing every really changes.  This session won't solve a problem that has taken hundreds of years to create, but it will provide tools and language for participants to be able to engage in thoughtful and healthy conversations about race and racism.

Resources:


Jeff Kerssen-Griep

Bio: Jeff Kerssen-Griep, Ph.D. is Professor of Communication at the University of Portland (Portland, OR), teaching Communication across Barriers and Intercultural Communication, plus Interpersonal, Team, Public, and Instructional Communication (his specialty). His work explores communication practices (such as facework) that sustain authentic connections and socially just attitudes.
Jeff's scholarship examines cross-cultural contact and helps teachers and other leaders navigate the skilled interactions that build engaged, diverse, and motivated learning environments. His research is published in several journals and book chapters and has earned 14 “Top Paper” conference designations to-date. Honors include UP faculty awards for outstanding teaching (2004) and outstanding scholarship (2010), UP students' "faculty of the year" award in 2006, and the Western States Communication Association's "Master Teacher" designation in 2006. He's also a longtime guitarist and percussionist, currently backing fiddlers in popular contra dance bands Joyride and Wild Hair.

Sessions:

  • Communicating Across Barriers: Learning to See and Avoid T.U.I. ("Thinking Under the Influence") in Connecting with Others: Learn to recognize and avoid T.U.I. ("Thinking Under the Influence") of unhelpful dominant assumptions that hinder people’s ability to connect and interact with people unlike themselves.

  • Communicating Across Barriers: Navigating Unexpected Differences with Unfamiliar Others: Normalize your own responses to novel cultural situations and learn to recognize and navigate unexpected communication differences across cultural and societal boundaries.

  • Communicating Across Barriers: Interpersonal Skills for Intercultural Interactions and Relationships: Learn interpersonal knowledge, attitudes, and skills that help create authentic and more comfortable connections across common societal boundaries such as race, ability, social class, sexuality, and gender identities.

Suggested Resource:

  • Communication and Racial Equity by John Stewart


Rolf Vegdahl: Village musician

Bio: Rolf is a church musician at Lake Chelan Lutheran Church.  He also composes and arranges sacred and secular music; teaches guitar, piano, ukulele and voice; and performs.

 

July 30 - August 5

gary mason

Bio: Rev. Dr. Gary Mason is a Methodist minister and directs a conflict transformation organization based in Belfast called "Rethinking Conflict." Prior to this he spent 27 years as a Methodist clergy person in parish ministry in Belfast and has played an integral role in the Northern Irish peace process. He played a key role in establishing the Skainos project, which is a world class urban centre developed in a post conflict society as a model of co-existence and shared space, and it is acknowledged as the largest faith-based redevelopment project in Western Europe. Mason is a close advisor to Protestant ex-combatants on the civilianisation efforts of paramilitaries. He was instrumental in facilitating negotiations with paramilitaries and government officials, and in 2007 his contribution was formally recognized by the Queen. In 2009, Mason’s church was the stage from which Loyalist paramilitaries announced their weapons decommissioning. Mason has lectured in political and academic forums throughout Europe, South Africa, the Middle East and the U.S.A. on lessons from the Irish peace process. He has been interviewed on CNN, BBC, ITV and various radio programs. He holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Ulster, completed his theological studies at Queens University, and a Bachelor’s in Business Studies from the University of Ulster. Gary is a Research Fellow at the Kennedy Institute for Conflict Intervention at Maynooth University in Ireland. He is an Adjunct Professor at the Candler School of theology at Emory University in Atlanta lecturing on reconciliation peace building, the history of the N Ireland conflict, racism, sectarianism and conflict transformation.

Sessions: The Role of the Faith Community in Building Peace and Reconciliation

  • Sessions 1 & 2: The role of reconciliation, memory, and theology on shaping the public
  • Session 3: From extremism to inclusion, what hardliners joining the Peace Process in Northern Ireland can teach a post-election United States
  • Session 4: Redirecting the church outwards

Suggested Resources


GLENN AND DEBorAh DOERING

Bio: Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts. Deborah received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When not working in collaboration, her individual works focus on the relationship of the keywords Nature and Technology, and can be seen at www.DeborahDoering.com.

Glenn received his MS in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago. His individual works explore the keywords Biology, Body, and Fashion. He creates unique wearable objects that can be seen at https://www.instagram.com/parlaarte/

Together, Deborah and Glenn have created participatory “art actions” in many parts of the world. In addition, the Doerings have co-directed an alternative art space, taught art and design, and have worked with non-profits and for-profit organizations.

 The Doerings believe that the strength of DOEprojekts is to find common ground in working with each other, with other artists/artisans, and with the public – moving contemporary culture toward “the common good.”

Sessions: Socially-Engaged Art Collaborative DOEprojekts
Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts. Deborah and Glenn emphasize both experiences and artifacts as they work with communities and individuals. We are able to find a strong common ground in almost any situation. We want this to be the strength of DOEprojekts – to find common ground in working with each other, with other artists/artisans, and with the public.

Suggested Resources:


Paul Rohde

Bio: Paul is campus pastor at Augustana University in Sioux Falls, SD.  His passion is narrative theology. He tells his students he studies it to convince them their lives are stories and not answers because the Gospel itself is a story.  He taught at Holden for the first time in 1993 and returned in various capacities every year until 2012.  He and his wife, Susan, are parents to three grown daughters and very happy new grandparents.  For fun, they play piano duets, garden, hike, camp and travel.  They are very eager to return to Holden.

Sessions: Living Word - Listening to Genesis for cues about loving our neighbors and siblings 
The Genesis saga of Abraham and his family narrates persistent sibling struggles and the birth of Judaism, Islam, and [eventually] Christianity.  We listen to Isaac and Ishmael, Esau and Jacob, Rachel and Leah, and Joseph and his siblings for clues about interfaith relationships, religious violence and faithful response.  Setting religious violence in the context of sibling rivalry helps us read the texts as both cosmic and personal.  Don’t we all have tales about our siblings?  The insightful work of Rabbi Jonathon Sacks, Not in God’s Name: Confronting Religious Violence will be a guide.

Resources:
Not in God's Name: Confronting Religious Violence
by Jonathan Sacks

 

Roy Hammerling

Bio: Dr. Roy Hammerling, a PhD graduate of the University of Notre Dame in Church History, has been a Professor of Religion at Concordia College for over 20 years. His books include A History of Prayer: The First to the Fifteenth Century and The Lord’s Prayer in the Early Church: The Pearl of Great Price. He has written articles and lectured on Martin Luther, the history of Christian Spirituality, religion and film, Islam, and religion in modern culture. He travels regularly with students and alumni groups for Concordia College across Europe, Turkey, and Egypt. Likewise, he is a consultant for a documentary film company, Endless Eye Productions (www.endlesseye.com). The documentaries he has worked on range from “Message from the East” about one of Pakistan’s founding fathers, Allama Muhammad Iqbal to “My Country No More” about the Williston oil boom.  He is the co-founder of PACODES (Panyijiar Community Development Services) a local North Dakota non-for-profit organization that works with the Lost Boys and Girls of Southern Sudan (www.pacodes.org).  He is also an ELCA pastor who has served parishes in Pittsburg and Williston, ND in the 1980s. The son of German-Russian immigrants, Dr. Hammerling has been a guest lecturer in Pakistan, Europe, and the USA.

Session: The Wittenberg Door: 500 Years of Reformation
October 31, 1517, the day Martin Luther posted the 95 Theses on the Castle Church Door in Wittenberg 500 years ago, is seen by most scholars as a watershed moment of history.  Why?  For one week we will explore Martin Luther’s unexpected career as a reformer and what his life might suggest for those who seek to do social justice in the modern world.  These sessions will examine the ideas of discovering one’s passion, study as a spiritual exercise, developing a conscience, and finally taking the risk to stand for social justice in our day and age.

 

Terry Fretheim

Bio: Terry Fretheim is a Professor Emeritus of Old Testament at Luther Seminary, St Paul, MN.  He retired in 2013 and has since taught for single semesters at Trinity Seminary, Columbus, OH; Lutheran Seminary, Hong; and (spring, 2017) Candler School of Theology, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga.  He has published over 20 books and about 100 articles for church and the academy.  He is married to Faith and they have two children and four grandchildren. 

Session: God, the Bible, and Natural Disasters
Natural disasters have occurred with no little frequency in our world.  How shall we speak of biblical understandings of such disasters?  How shall we speak of God's relationship to these events and the suffering and death that are often experienced?  With those kinds of theological questions in mind, Terry will explore the following topics:

  1. How will we speak of God's "relationship" with the world?
  2. How should we speak of God and Creation in Genesis?
  3. The book of Job and its reflections on God and natural disasters.
  4. What shall we say about issues of suffering?
  5. God and the shape of the future.


Elizabeth Austen

Bio: As the Washington State Poet Laureate for 2014-16, Elizabeth Austen traveled to all of the state's 39 counties, offering writing workshops and giving readings. Her collection Every Dress a Decision (Blue Begonia Press, 2011) was a finalist for the Washington State Book Award. She’s also the author of two chapbooks, The Girl Who Goes Alone (Floating Bridge Press, 2010) and Where Currents Meet (Toadlily Press, 2010). Her poems have been featured on The Writer’s Almanac and Verse Daily, in the Los Angeles Review, Bellingham Review and Willow Springs. She has been featured at Poets House in New York City, Minneapolis's The Loft, the Skagit River Poetry Festival, Spokane's Get Lit!, Seattle's Cheap Wine and Poetry and Bumbershoot, among others. Elizabeth produces poetry programming for NPR-affiliate KUOW 94.9 and earned an MFA at Antioch University Los Angeles. She makes her living at Seattle Children’s Hospital, where she also offers poetry and journaling workshops for the staff.

Sessions

  • Line Breaks & Topography: Shapes that Influence Our Lives (with Jourdan Imani Keith):

    What can the shape of the land tell and teach us? How does shape determine a poem’s power and reach? In this interactive workshop, we'll examine maps, understand what the lines can tell us and follow examples of poems, which use the topography created by line breaks to give a palpable texture to the poem.  We’ll read and discuss poems of place, letting them prompt our own new writing about the particular places that have shaped our lives.

  • Earth Songs: Poems of Protest and Hope: 

    “And I’ve been waiting long / for an earth song.” —Langston Hughes. We’re witnesses to — and participants in — a time of overwhelming environmental peril. We’ll read and respond to the work of a diverse array poets who’ve managed to find words of both protest and hope for our time.

 

Jourdan Imani Keith

Bio:

Jourdan Imani Keith is a contributing writer for Orion Magazine. Her TEDx Talk "Your Body of Water" is the theme for King County's 2016-2017 Poetry on Buses program.  Her essays, "Desegregating Wilderness" and "At Risk" appear in the 2015 Best American Science and Nature Writing Anthology (Houghton Mifflin). Her ekphrastic poems and stories featured at the Northwest African American Museum in 2015 as part of the Glass Orchidarium exhibit and at the Seattle Art Museum's REMIX in November 2015.  A storyteller in the Griot tradition, she has been awarded fellowships from Wildbranch, Santa Fe Science Writing workshop, VONA, Hedgebrook, and Jack Straw. As Seattle Public Library’s first naturalist-in-Residence she designed "Natural Literacy," linking environmental and early childhood literacy. She continues her service to community as a Seattle Poet Populist Emeritus and received awards from University of Washington, Artist Trust, 4Culture and Seattle’s Office of Arts and Culture. Keith’s essay collection, Tugging at the Web is forthcoming from University of Washington Press.

Sessions

  • Line Breaks & Topography: Shapes that Influence Our Lives (with Elizabeth Austen):

    What can the shape of the land tell and teach us? How does shape determine a poem’s power and reach? In this interactive workshop, we'll examine maps, understand what the lines can tell us and follow examples of poems, which use the topography created by line breaks to give a palpable texture to the poem.  We’ll read and discuss poems of place, letting them prompt our own new writing about the particular places that have shaped our lives.

  • Human Estuaries: Where Our Bodies of Water Meet: 

    "Even the bones are watery."-- USGS  We carry memory in the water of ourselves. Memory is transported through what we ingest, inhale, and perceive as we move through concrete and wooded landscapes. When we excrete all that we have taken in we become like estuaries--the place where fresh waters meet the sea. In this class the poetry and essay prompts will allow us to wade into personal tributaries which carry us to where our collective waters meet, figuratively and literally. 


Dave Peterson

Bio: Dave is a research scientist working for the USDA Forest Service at the Wenatchee Forestry Sciences laboratory in Wenatchee, WA. He conducts field-based research in the areas of fire ecology, forest ecology, restoration ecology, and climate change, with emphasis on forest ecosystems of eastern Washington and Oregon. Dave is interested in understanding how forest and grassland ecosystems respond to wildfire and post-fire management practices and how restoration-based forest management practices can be used to increase forest ecosystem resilience to fire and climate change. He is  currently conducting two research projects related to post-fire vegetation recovery on the Carlton and Wolverine wildfires that burned large areas of forest near Lake Chelan in 2014 and 2015, including some field work in Railroad Creek valley near Holden. He is married to Marcia Fall, a former volunteer staff coordinator at Holden, and we have twin seven-year-old daughters, Annika and Maren. They live in Wenatchee, Washington, where they are members of Grace Lutheran Church and enjoy a wide variety of outdoor activities like hiking, biking, skiing, and photography.

Sessions

  • The Historical and Ecological Context for the Wolverine Fire: Discuss the role of fire in forests, human impacts, and recent history of wildfires near Lake Chelan.
  • The Wolverine Fire and its Aftermath: Discuss the Wolverine Fire and its impacts on vegetation, soils, water, wildlife, and human safety.
  • Ecological Recovery and Re-Formation After Wolverine: Discuss post-fire ecological processes and how they promote (or delay) ecosystem recovery.


John Marty

Bio: John Marty is a state senator in Minnesota who works for public policies that serve the entire community, especially the homeless, those without healthcare and other vulnerable people.  He believes we can build a more peaceful and just society that protects the environment and leaves a better world for future generations.  John is the author of a recent book, Healing Health Care, which offers a roadmap to universal health care.

Sessions: With our nation and world more bitterly divided than ever, there is an urgent need for a new model.  We will consider how, with a clear vision and good courage, we can build a society where love overcomes hate and we can work together to address our social, economic, and environmental challenges.
Addressing climate change? Providing affordable healthcare to all? Welcoming foreigners into our communities? Ensuring that no child grows up in poverty? These are noble goals, but seriously, in this vicious political climate?  Do we abandon all hope and give up, or is there a path forward?  My sessions will examine these challenges that our society faces, and offer hope that we, with a clear vision, can move forward in good courage to build a better world.

 

Elisabeth Cherland: Village Musician


Bio: Elisabeth is a Lutheran church musician, choir director, singer, violinist, music educator, and former village musician originally from Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. She has degrees from Concordia College in Moorhead, MN, VanderCook College of Music in Chicago, and she is currently a DMA student in the Choral Conducting program at the University of Washington. Elisabeth lives in Seattle with her partner Kent, and two sons (Elijah and Leif). She loves hymns, doughnuts, knitting, leading group singing, and has a new appreciation for sunshine after a Seattle winter

 

August 6 - 12

GLENN AND DEBorAh DOERING

Bio: Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts. Deborah received her MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. When not working in collaboration, her individual works focus on the relationship of the keywords Nature and Technology, and can be seen at www.DeborahDoering.com.

Glenn received his MS in Biology from Loyola University of Chicago. His individual works explore the keywords Biology, Body, and Fashion. He creates unique wearable objects that can be seen at https://www.instagram.com/parlaarte/

Together, Deborah and Glenn have created participatory “art actions” in many parts of the world. In addition, the Doerings have co-directed an alternative art space, taught art and design, and have worked with non-profits and for-profit organizations.

 The Doerings believe that the strength of DOEprojekts is to find common ground in working with each other, with other artists/artisans, and with the public – moving contemporary culture toward “the common good.”

Sessions: Socially-Engaged Art Collaborative DOEprojekts
Deborah Adams Doering and Glenn N. Doering are founders and lead artists in the socially-engaged art collaborative DOEprojekts. Deborah and Glenn emphasize both experiences and artifacts as they work with communities and individuals. We are able to find a strong common ground in almost any situation. We want this to be the strength of DOEprojekts – to find common ground in working with each other, with other artists/artisans, and with the public.

Suggested Resources:

 

John Noltner

Bio: John is a Minnesota-based photographer. For 25 years he has made images for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. In 2009 he founded A Peace of My Mind, a multimedia arts project that explores our common humanity through portraits and storytelling as he asks people from across the country to consider the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?”

Session: A Peace of My Mind
Join photographer John Noltner for morning reflections with his exhibit A Peace of My Mind and explore the stories of diverse individuals responding to the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?” Sessions will include storytelling and group discussion around a theme, and over the course of the week will include compassion, forgiveness, and creativity.

Resource: www.apeaceofmymind.net

 

David Hahn

Bio: Rev. David Hahn Ph.D. serves an assistant of the bishop of the Northwest Washington synod. He has served a variety of congregational settings in the Southwest. He’s an adjunct faculty at Luther Seminary teaching courses in the Missional Church, and Evangelism in Contemporary Contexts. He is keen on a theology of listening and how listening invites a new imagination for participating more fully with the Spirit’s life in our world. David is not new to the Holden community, and throughout the years has been present as a volunteer and guest.

Sessions: Acoustic Theology: The Spirit of Listening
What does it mean that our relationship to creation begins with listening? How might renewal begin by an invitation into death before life? Even more, how might God’s listening in on our world shape our own listening? These questions begin our pursuit of what I like to call an acoustic theology, a practical wisdom of God’s life among us in the Spirit’s listening to creation, and where bearing the world’s struggles renews life and hope. We’ll explore these themes through Exodus narratives, Paul’s letter to the Galatians, and the book of Revelation. This work is precisely the Living Word seeking to be born in us for today’s world.

 

Chris Scharen

Bio: Chris is the Vice President of Applied Research and the Center for the Study of Theological Education at Auburn Theological Seminary of New York. His academic research and teaching falls in the area of practical theology; focusing on forming leaders of faith and moral courage to face the big justice challenges of the 21st Century. He has written a number of books, including most recently Someone’s Got To Care: The Roots and Hip Hop as Prophetic Vocation (Cascade 2017); the co-authored Christian Practical Wisdom: What it is, Why it matters (Eerdmans 2016); and Fieldwork in Theology: Exploring the Social Context of God's Work in the World (Baker Academic 2015). Chris is currently writing a book called After Laura, a book that is part memoir and part theological engagement with white racial identity. He also is a lover of pies--eating and baking, savory and sweet. Dr. Scharen is married to Sonja, a nurse-midwife and has two children, Isaiah and Grace.

Sessions: Dear White Christians: Examining White Racial Identity in the United States
My great-grandmother was a double cousin of Laura Ingalls Wilder, born in the same year (1867) in Pepin, WI. Through a lively examination of my own family history and the famous stories of Laura, these sessions will think through what it means to white in the United States, including both the history of setters on Native lands, and the system of chattel slavery as a means to farm that land. The sessions will both attempt to tell a history of the construction of white racial identity and ask hard theological questions about racial justice today.


John Marty

Bio: John Marty is a state senator in Minnesota who works for public policies that serve the entire community, especially the homeless, those without healthcare and other vulnerable people.  He believes we can build a more peaceful and just society that protects the environment and leaves a better world for future generations.  John is the author of a recent book, Healing Health Care, which offers a roadmap to universal health care.

Sessions: With our nation and world more bitterly divided than ever, there is an urgent need for a new model.  We will consider how, with a clear vision and good courage, we can build a society where love overcomes hate and we can work together to address our social, economic, and environmental challenges.
Addressing climate change? Providing affordable healthcare to all? Welcoming foreigners into our communities? Ensuring that no child grows up in poverty? These are noble goals, but seriously, in this vicious political climate?  Do we abandon all hope and give up, or is there a path forward?  My sessions will examine these challenges that our society faces, and offer hope that we, with a clear vision, can move forward in good courage to build a better world.

 

Tom Witt: Village Musician

Bio: Tom Witt is a keyboardist, worship leader, song leader and worship planner. Tom co-founded Bread for the Journey, an ensemble committed to encouraging congregational singing, sharing music with theological integrity, and helping music ministers to inspire the community's song and serve the community's prayer. In the past, Tom has served as musician-in-residence at Holden, and as a global music consultant for the Global Mission Unit of the ELCA.  He currently is on the chapel music staff at Luther Seminary in St. Paul, and serves as the musician at the ecumenical United Theological Seminary in New Brighton, MN. In his non-musical life, Tom is a web designer for churches and other small non-profits and also works as an International Travel Specialist at Group Travel Directors, based in Minneapolis. Tom first came to Holden in 1962 when he was 5 years old.


August 13 - 19

John Noltner

Bio: John is a Minnesota-based photographer. For 25 years he has made images for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. In 2009 he founded A Peace of My Mind, a multimedia arts project that explores our common humanity through portraits and storytelling as he asks people from across the country to consider the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?”

Session: A Peace of My Mind
Join photographer John Noltner for morning reflections with his exhibit A Peace of My Mind and explore the stories of diverse individuals responding to the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?” Sessions will include storytelling and group discussion around a theme, and over the course of the week will include compassion, forgiveness, and creativity.

Resource: www.apeaceofmymind.net


Chris Scharen

Bio: Chris is the Vice President of Applied Research and the Center for the Study of Theological Education at Auburn Theological Seminary of New York. His academic research and teaching falls in the area of practical theology; focusing on forming leaders of faith and moral courage to face the big justice challenges of the 21st Century. He has written a number of books, including most recently Someone’s Got To Care: The Roots and Hip Hop as Prophetic Vocation (Cascade 2017); the co-authored Christian Practical Wisdom: What it is, Why it matters (Eerdmans 2016); and Fieldwork in Theology: Exploring the Social Context of God's Work in the World (Baker Academic 2015). Chris is currently writing a book called After Laura, a book that is part memoir and part theological engagement with white racial identity. He also is a lover of pies--eating and baking, savory and sweet. Dr. Scharen is married to Sonja, a nurse-midwife and has two children, Isaiah and Grace.

Sessions: Dear White Christians: Examining White Racial Identity in the United States
My great-grandmother was a double cousin of Laura Ingalls Wilder, born in the same year (1867) in Pepin, WI. Through a lively examination of my own family history and the famous stories of Laura, these sessions will think through what it means to white in the United States, including both the history of setters on Native lands, and the system of chattel slavery as a means to farm that land. The sessions will both attempt to tell a history of the construction of white racial identity and ask hard theological questions about racial justice today.


John Marty

Bio: John Marty is a state senator in Minnesota who works for public policies that serve the entire community, especially the homeless, those without healthcare and other vulnerable people.  He believes we can build a more peaceful and just society that protects the environment and leaves a better world for future generations.  John is the author of a recent book, Healing Health Care, which offers a roadmap to universal health care.

Sessions: With our nation and world more bitterly divided than ever, there is an urgent need for a new model.  We will consider how, with a clear vision and good courage, we can build a society where love overcomes hate and we can work together to address our social, economic, and environmental challenges.
Addressing climate change? Providing affordable healthcare to all? Welcoming foreigners into our communities? Ensuring that no child grows up in poverty? These are noble goals, but seriously, in this vicious political climate?  Do we abandon all hope and give up, or is there a path forward?  My sessions will examine these challenges that our society faces, and offer hope that we, with a clear vision, can move forward in good courage to build a better world.

 

David Hahn

Bio: Rev. David Hahn Ph.D. serves an assistant of the bishop of the Northwest Washington synod. He has served a variety of congregational settings in the Southwest. He’s an adjunct faculty at Luther Seminary teaching courses in the Missional Church, and Evangelism in Contemporary Contexts. He is keen on a theology of listening and how listening invites a new imagination for participating more fully with the Spirit’s life in our world. David is not new to the Holden community, and throughout the years has been present as a volunteer and guest.

Sessions: Acoustic Theology: The Spirit of Listening
What does it mean that our relationship to creation begins with listening? How might renewal begin by an invitation into death before life? Even more, how might God’s listening in on our world shape our own listening? These questions begin our pursuit of what I like to call an acoustic theology, a practical wisdom of God’s life among us in the Spirit’s listening to creation, and where bearing the world’s struggles renews life and hope. We’ll explore these themes through Exodus narratives, Paul’s letter to the Galatians, and the book of Revelation. This work is precisely the Living Word seeking to be born in us for today’s world.


Interfaith Dialogue

Nur Mood serves as the Coordinator of Religious and Spiritual Life Programs in the Wesley Center for Spirituality, Service and Social Justice at Hamline University. He was born in Mogadishu, Somalia, and previously lived in Cairo, Egypt, before immigrating to the United States in 2004. Nur earned his BA in Applied Economics from The College of Saint Scholastica in Duluth, MN, and is currently pursuing his MBA at Hamline.  In his work, Nur supervises the student leaders of diverse religious and interfaith groups on campus.  For two years in a row, Hamline has received the award of Distinction in Interfaith Service with the national President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll.

Rev. Nancy Victorin-Vangerud is serving in her 9th year at Hamline University as the University Chaplain and Director of the Wesley Center for Spirituality, Service and Social Justice.  Ordained in the United Methodist Church for nearly 30 years, Nancy has served in adult education, youth and retreat ministry, pastoral leadership, and taught theology on the faculty at Murdoch University in Perth, Western Australia.  She holds a Ph.D. in Religion and M.Div. from Vanderbilt University.  At Hamline, she also teaches adjunct on the Religion faculty.  Nancy is passionate about urban agriculture and community gardens--her fruit trees, veggie gardens and berry vines provide holy space and much joy for her family. 

Rabbi Esther Adler has been Associate Chaplain of Jewish Life at Hamline University since 2005. She is also Associate Rabbi at Mount Zion Temple in St. Paul, MN.  Rabbi Adler holds a BA in Flute Performance from UCLA, a Masters, Rabbinic Ordination and Doctor of Divinity from Hebrew Union College Jewish Institute of Religion, and a Masters in Jewish History from Yale University.

John Noltner is a Minnesota-based photographer. For 25 years he has made images for national magazines, Fortune 500 companies, and non-profit organizations. In 2009 he founded A Peace of My Mind, a multimedia arts project that explores our common humanity through portraits and storytelling as he asks people from across the country to consider the simple question, “What does peace mean to you?”

Sessions:

  • Learn how the three Abrahamic religions are similar and different. Join leaders from the Jewish, Christian and Muslim religions as they explore common themes through the week. Methodist Minister Rev. Nancy Victorin Vangerud, Rabi Esther Adler and Interfaith facilitator Nur Mood will explore common ground as they engage in a lively panel discussion led by A Peace of My Mind’s founder John Noltner. They will focus on the topics: Who are Abraham, Moses, and Jesus?, Sin and forgiveness, and Is there any hope?
  • Judaism 101 with Rabbi Esther Adler: Basic Information on Judaism with lots of room for questions.
  • Midrash: Where Text Meets Context with Rabbi Esther Adler: Introduction to Midrash, which is a multivocal approach to textual interpretation.  I will explain the process of reading Midrashically, we will study some examples, and then do some creative interpretation of a biblical text.
  • Islam 101 with Nur Mood: Understanding the basics of Islam within the context of interfaith conversations
  • Wendell Berry and Restoring the Table of Holy Communion with Rev. Nancy Victorin-Vangerud

Suggested Resources:

  • Acts of Faith: The Story of an American Muslim in the Struggle for the Soul of a Generation by Eboo Patel (Explore the website of the Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC), founded by Eboo Patel, https://www.ifyc.org/)

  • Essential Writings and The Sabbath by Abraham Heschel
  • A History of God: The 4000 Year Old Quest of Judaism, Christianity and Islam by Karen Armstrong
  • Toward a True Kinship of Faiths: How the World's Religions Can Come Together by The Dalai Lama
  • Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s Nobel Peace Prize speech (1964), "The World House"
  • Love Poems from God: 12 Sacred Voices from the East and West by Daniel Ladinsky
  • "On Being" with Krista Tippett
  • Harvard University's "Pluralism Project," founded by Dr. Diana Eck
  • This Day: New and Collected Sabbath Poems by Wendell Berry
  • Bringing it to the Table by Wendell Berry and Michael Pollan
  • Rooted and Grounded in Love: Joining God’s Feast of Holy Communion in the Global Market Economy by Timothy R. Eberhart (Forthcoming Summer 2017)
  • Grounded: Finding God in the World – A Spiritual Revolution by Diana Butler Bass


Kirsten Laderach

Bio: Kirsten is a minster of word and sacrament with the ELCA. She is currently living and working in Madagascar as the Country Coordinator for YAGM (Young Adults in Global Mission), a program of the ELCA. She is living in Antananarivo, the country’s capital and I travel throughout the island supporting our young adult volunteers and the work of church accompaniment.
Prior to this call, she worked in Stockton, California as a Pastor at Zion Lutheran Church. While here the congregation and she worked to incorporate visual and musical arts into their ministries, worship, outreach and even the physical space.
Kirsten received the Graduate Preaching Fellowship from Luther Seminary upon graduation in May 2011 and traveled for a year in India, South Africa and Israel/Palestine. That year was a year of experientially studying wealth and poverty, racial divisions and religious pluralism and strife. Specifically, she studied Dalit Theology, Post-Apartheid/Apartheid in South Africa and walked the bible and crossed religious boundaries in Israel/Palestine.

Sessions:

  • Madagascar - more than a movie: Not a tourism lecture but still you might think about going after learning about the unique and inviting people and land. 
  • Madagascar - A faith of their own:  Traditional beliefs and the right political/missionary climate created the right environment for a revival which still today fuels the life and the spirit of the church.
  • Madagascar - Hidden in plain sight:  It's the big island we know little about, but it's challenges are anything but little.

 

Philip Brunelle: Village Musician

Bio: Philip Brunelle, artistic director and founder of VocalEssence, is an internationally renowned conductor, choral scholar and visionary. He has made his lifelong mission the promotion of the choral art in all its forms, especially rarely heard works of the past and outstanding new music. Under his leadership, VocalEssence has commissioned more than 240 works to date. Philip has conducted symphonies (New York Philharmonic, Seattle Symphony, and Minnesota Orchestra among others) as well as choral festivals and operas on six continents. He is editor of two choral series for Boosey & Hawkes and chairman of the review committee for Walton Music. Philip is also Organist-Choirmaster at Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis.

Over the past decade Philip has been deeply involved with the International Federation for Choral Music (IFCM). He served as president of the Sixth World Symposium on Choral Music, held in Minneapolis in 2002. He is a Vice President of the IFCM Board and served as Executive Director for the 2014 World Symposium on Choral Music in Seoul, South Korea. In 2017 Philip will serve as Artistic Advisor for the 2017 World Choral Symposium in Barcelona, Spain.

Philip is the recipient of the Weston H. Noble Lifetime Achievement Award, given by the North Central American Choral Directors Association; the F. Melius Christiansen Lifetime Achievement Award, American Choral Directors Association-Minnesota Chapter’s highest honor; and the Michael Korn Founder’s Award for Development of the Professional Choral Art, Chorus America’s highest lifetime achievement award.

Philip holds five honorary doctorates and has been recognized for his commitment to choral music by Norway (Commander of the Royal Norwegian Order of Merit), the United Kingdom (Honorary Member of the Order of the British Empire), Hungary (Kodály Medal), Sweden (Royal Order of the Polar Star) and Mexico (Ohtli Recognition Award).

 

August 20 - 26: Abriendo Caminos!

Abriendo Caminos is a week spent celebrating the Spanish-speaking community in and around Holden Village. The week is filled with bilingual and multicultural programs instead of Holden's typical teaching faculty schedule. While anyone is welcome to visit Holden during Abriendo Caminos, the majority of our guest spaces are reserved for Spanish-speaking guests from Washington state.

 

August 27 - September 2

David l. Carlson

Bio: David L. Carlson is an adjunct faculty member at the University of Denver. In 2014, he founded the Ethics and Ecological Economics Forum at the Iliff School of Theology. The Forum focuses on the scientific, economic, psycho-social, and ethical dimensions of climate change. In 2013, he graduated from the Joint Ph.D. Program in Religious and Theological Studies from Iliff and the University of Denver. His dissertation focused on the interrelationships among religion, science, and theology. He received his first Ph.D. (mathematics) in 1971 from the University of Colorado Boulder.
He recently published two articles on Pope Francis’ Encyclical, Laudato Si’: (1) “A Song-Inspired Narrative of Resistance” (2015); and (2), “Pope Francis, Integral Ecology, and the Call for New Thinking”—a section within a journal article, “WTO Reforms, Sustainable Development, and Climate Clubs: Calls for New Thinking” (2016).

Sessions:

  • Pope Francis’ Encyclical, “Laudato Si’ (‘Praise Be’): On Care for Our Common Home”: An overview of Laudato and its analysis of key factors causing global environmental deterioration.
  • Laudato Si’: Envisioning a Civilization of Love through Integral Ecology: Laudato’s vision is based upon principles of the common good and the interconnectedness of all things.
  • Climate Change, Laudato Si', and Hope: The threat of climate change; why most of us tend to ignore its reality; hope, Laudato, music, poetry.


Terrill Chang

Bio: Terrill is a mostly-retired environmental engineer from the Seattle area who specializes in solid waste management. He was involved in the planning and design of large and small waste facilities in Washington and currently consults for the Chehalis tribe and Orcas (Island) Recycling Services.  Since 1979 he has been a member of Holden’s Science & Technology committee and an advisor to the Garbologist, working on the old landfill, the corral composters, the earth tub composters, the incinerator, and the cardboard baler.  He authored the Village’s Solid Waste Management Plan (2014) and was involved in the design of the new garbo facilities constructed in late 2016. 

Sessions: Garbology Re-imagined: Rethinking Reduce/Reuse/Recycle
An anecdote-filled history of Garbology at Holden over the years -- remembering what we liked and disliked about garbo duty, a democratizing event that, like dish team and Vespers, is required of all staff.  Why it isn't easy being green, and why we should Re-Think the Reuse-Reduce-Recycle paradigm. By the will of God, we will feel inspired to make changes in our lives that benefit all of creation.

 

David M. Carlson

Bio: David M. Carlson is pastor of Gloria Dei Lutheran Church in Duluth, MN. Originally from Denver, CO, he holds theological degrees from Princeton Theological Seminary, the Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, and Luther Seminary. "Earth Stewardship and the Missio Dei: Participating in the Care and Redemption of All God Has Made" is the title of his Doctor of Ministry thesis, which he defended in March 2016.

Sessions:

  • Earth Stewardship and the Missio Dei - Theoretical Perspectives: Theory & practice of earthkeeping within God's mission: sustainability, globalization, and global civil society  
  • Earth Stewardship and the Missio Dei - Biblical Perspectives: Biblical & practical resources for earthkeeping as part of God’s mission: stewardship and nature as an active subject
  • Earth Stewardship and the Missio Dei - Theological Perspectives: Theological resources for earthkeeping in God’s mission: perichoresis, eschatology, and sacramental imagination


Emilie bouvier

Bio: Emilie Bouvier is an artist and community organizer who lives and works in Minneapolis. Her artistic mediums include alternative-process photography and pottery, with the occasional protest art/ community art project thrown in. She did her undergraduate study at St. Olaf and holds a Master of Arts degree from Luther Seminary, where she also served as a resident artist. For Emilie, theological reflection profoundly intersects with the spirituality of artistic expression. In her daily professional life, she serves as the Congregational Organizer for Environmental Justice with the Minneapolis Area Synod (ELCA). Working in the Bishop's office on ecojustice gives her the opportunity to work with church leaders, use her skills in community organizing, and shepherd on-the-ground projects that have tangible impact. It is at the intersection of faith communities, environmentalism, art, and activism that she finds herself most deeply rooted.


liz rog: Guest Musician

Bio: Song leader Liz Rog of Decorah, Iowa believes that everyone can sing and loves to twine voices of all generations. Liz uses group singing as a tool for building community and for restoring our sense of belonging and connection in the world. Her song circles offer a safe, fun, and supported space where all voices are welcome. When we sing together in simple harmony, we build bridges of acceptance, compassion, and joy.